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IT Certification questions

#21Orestes417Posted 12/10/2013 11:28:02 AM
The only thing that trumps experience really is connections. Don't ever underestimate the power of who you know.
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I am the mighty thesaurus! RAWR!
#22Worknofun370Posted 12/10/2013 11:28:46 AM
Orestes417 posted...
No, certifications most certainly do not trump degrees. The only time that'd ever come close to being true is on the very high end. For the most part the only thing certs will do without appropriate real world experience to back them is screw you over for being a paper tiger.


I disagree slightly.

I agree the high end is where it matters most, no ifs and or buts about that. But if the job is very very specific to a cert, than having that cert may be more important than a degree to the people doing the hiring.
#23Worknofun370Posted 12/10/2013 11:29:05 AM
Orestes417 posted...
The only thing that trumps experience really is connections. Don't ever underestimate the power of who you know.



That's very true, unfortunately.
#24Orestes417Posted 12/10/2013 11:37:44 AM
Worknofun370 posted...
Orestes417 posted...
No, certifications most certainly do not trump degrees. The only time that'd ever come close to being true is on the very high end. For the most part the only thing certs will do without appropriate real world experience to back them is screw you over for being a paper tiger.


I disagree slightly.

I agree the high end is where it matters most, no ifs and or buts about that. But if the job is very very specific to a cert, than having that cert may be more important than a degree to the people doing the hiring.


If you're talking about the more common certs and entry level positions the basic assumption is there's going to be some degree of retraining either way. To me, on paper, the only thing a CCNA proves is that the applicant has a better grasp of the jargon and sub basics of how things work. That's not enough to make me want to take them over a guy with no cert who seems to fit the culture better.

Now that changes significantly when we start talking about certs with hardcore lab requirements like the CCIE. Those guys you can be 100% sure not only know their textbook, but can implement it under greater pressure than most of us in the field encounter on a day to day basis.
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I am the mighty thesaurus! RAWR!
#25Worknofun370Posted 12/10/2013 11:49:12 AM
Orestes417 posted...
Worknofun370 posted...
Orestes417 posted...
No, certifications most certainly do not trump degrees. The only time that'd ever come close to being true is on the very high end. For the most part the only thing certs will do without appropriate real world experience to back them is screw you over for being a paper tiger.


I disagree slightly.

I agree the high end is where it matters most, no ifs and or buts about that. But if the job is very very specific to a cert, than having that cert may be more important than a degree to the people doing the hiring.


If you're talking about the more common certs and entry level positions the basic assumption is there's going to be some degree of retraining either way. To me, on paper, the only thing a CCNA proves is that the applicant has a better grasp of the jargon and sub basics of how things work. That's not enough to make me want to take them over a guy with no cert who seems to fit the culture better.

Now that changes significantly when we start talking about certs with hardcore lab requirements like the CCIE. Those guys you can be 100% sure not only know their textbook, but can implement it under greater pressure than most of us in the field encounter on a day to day basis.



Good point. I do agree with the culture fit without a doubt. I think I even said it in this topic but, the resume gets you the interview and the interview gets you the job.

You and I both know there are some idiotic hiring practices out there though, and somewhere there is some manager saying "Whoever we hire MUST have *insert dumb cert here*"
#26Orestes417Posted 12/10/2013 11:53:16 AM
Indeed. Most of them work for the government.
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I am the mighty thesaurus! RAWR!
#27ReddayePosted 12/11/2013 2:57:31 PM(edited)
MasterGamer72 posted...


From what I've heard, it does seem like Cisco's name holds more weight. Is the CCENT meant to be basic knowledge or is it still decently tough?
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Your CCENT is essentially the first half of the CCNA. You have the option to write the CCENT exam, and then the second CCNA exam (at the same time if you wish) to become CCNA. Just like A+ it's a matter of passing two exams to be CCNA certified.

CCENT covers the basics of networking in a more broad sense with subjects like subnetting (essential), routing protocols, basic security, basic wireless, networking hardware, basic hardware configuration, etc. It's an introduction to networking.

CCNA pushes you deeper into the basic topics. You'll expand on the major routing protocols (RIP, OSPF, EIGRP) and learn more of how they function, and how to configure them. You start working less with small all-in-one home "routers" and begin to configure and work with the actual routers, and switches themselves through CLI. You also go quite a bit deeper into the subnetting subject.

If you want to actually learn Cisco and not just use brain dumps to get your certs it can be quite challenging. Cisco test your depth of knowledge in a variety of subjects...sometimes to the extreme. There's a lot of information to take it, and a good deal of it is Cisco proprietary subject matter.

If you're interesting in going into networking I highly, HIGHLY recommend you start learning to do subnetting early on. If you can't subnet you're going to struggle to pass any Cisco cert exams past the CCENT. It really is the core of networking and important to know for any network related certification. Practically 90% of the certification questions involve subnetting in some form or another.
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"My vision is augmented." JC Denton
#28Worknofun370Posted 12/12/2013 9:51:21 AM
Reddaye posted...

If you're interesting in going into networking I highly, HIGHLY recommend you start learning to do subnetting early on. If you can't subnet you're going to fail any Cisco cert exams past the CCENT. It really is the core of networking and important to know for any network related certification. Practically 90% of the certification questions involve subnetting in some form or another.


Fixed that for you. :)


If you can't subnet, you're not passing Network exams.