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Gaming performance issues after upgrading to Windows 8.1

#11mrCubePosted 12/11/2013 7:34:02 PM
I would post the reasons that you're wrong but you'll just abandon the topic
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#12steveboblarryPosted 12/11/2013 7:37:25 PM
mrCube posted...
I would post the reasons that you're wrong but you'll just abandon the topic


Lol Its pointless he is just a windows 8 shill
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#13mrCubePosted 12/11/2013 8:22:51 PM(edited)
Eh I'll do it anyway. This is why 8.1 is much more like a service pack, and definitely not a whole new version of Windows.

It has the same exact timing as a service pack. A year after release. Just like every other service pack.

It's FREE. That has always been the case for service packs and never, ever been the case for new versions of Windows.

It's mandatory. Windows 8 won't be supported past late 2015 without the 8.1 update. This has always been the case with service packs, they've been mandatory in order to receive support. This means 8.1 is part of the Windows 8 lifecycle, and an entirely new version has never, ever been part of the lifecycle of an edition of Windows.

If you go to http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/lifecycle you can clearly see 8.1 is in the "Lastest Update or Service Pack" column for Windows 8.

The fact that the kernel version has been updated (although it still shows 6.2 if you check the kernel version programatically) simply reflects Microsoft's new "rapid release" system. Kind of like how Firefox took something like 9 years to get to FireFox 4, and after just two years of their new release cycle, they're at FireFox 25. Version numbers mean nothing in a lot of cases.

The name Windows 8.1 was likely just to show people that the OS has gone through a major update and to take a second look at it, after the extreme amount of negative press it had upon release and during the months following.

There is one way that it's unlike a service pack, and that is that you can't do a clean install of 8.1 with a Windows 8 key. There are ways around that, but AFAIK you could use a Windows 7 key to install from a Windows 7 SP2 disk so I'm not sure was Microsoft's game was here.


Edit: I should also point out that you say that each version of Windows is based on a new major build revision, but in the very same sentence you point out that the difference between Vista and 7's kernel build number is a minor revision.
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#14Bazooka_PenguinPosted 12/11/2013 8:02:01 PM
mrCube posted...
I would post the reasons that you're wrong but you'll just abandon the topic


Are you really going to start that again? I already explained that I dismissed your comment because it literally had nothing to do with what either of us were discussing. You only brought it up because you had nothing to say about the actual search functionality of Windows 8; search result options were never part of the discussion. And how is it that you didn't respond at all to ANYTHING I said: http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/916373-pc/68053160/767631982

You had nothing to say about bing integration or search filters which actually improve the functionality of searching. Instead you dropped the conversation and then a few pages later you drop my name literally in the middle of an exchange with two other people about a different topic. http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/916373-pc/68053160?page=7

It's pathetic, you can't even address my points properly so you try to attack someone you've stopped talking to. I've seen some passive-aggressive things on this board but that's just outright slimy.

Oh, and as for counting the actions of clicking. My initial point was to demonstrate how trivial the actions of using the mouse to navigate is compared to type-searching. If your reading comprehension were at or above an elementary level you would have understood that. And your example of using ctrl+shift+enter would still be less efficient than using the start screen and mouse.

So to tell you the truth, the reason why I left the thread was because there was nothing left to say. I didn't want to cause anymore bad blood between us because I knew you were a wormy person. And holding a grudge over that? On the internet? Jesus, maybe you're just a little sick in the head, defective I guess.
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#15AllmatteredPosted 12/11/2013 8:06:45 PM
Windows 8.1.

That's the problem right there
#16mrCubePosted 12/11/2013 8:18:43 PM
Hey bazooka can you just stick to one set of stupid arguments to blindly defend per topic? Thanks
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#17Bazooka_PenguinPosted 12/11/2013 8:58:32 PM
mrCube posted...
Eh I'll do it anyway. This is why 8.1 is much more like a service pack, and definitely not a whole new version of Windows.

It has the same exact timing as a service pack. A year after release. Just like every other service pack.

It's FREE. That has always been the case for service packs and never, ever been the case for new versions of Windows.

It's mandatory. Windows 8 won't be supported past late 2015 without the 8.1 update. This has always been the case with service packs, they've been mandatory in order to receive support. This means 8.1 is part of the Windows 8 lifecycle, and an entirely new version has never, ever been part of the lifecycle of an edition of Windows.

If you go to http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/lifecycle you can clearly see 8.1 is in the "Lastest Update or Service Pack" column for Windows 8.


Everything that fits the criteria of timing is a service pack now? It's completely superficial.

The price and support aren't properties of the software. What you're describing has to do with launching a new version of Windows as a new product. The support is a matter of business.
http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/lifecycle
Every Windows product has a lifecycle.

Yes, it's called an update.
http://www.neowin.net/news/microsoft-windows-81-is-an-update-not-a-service-pack
So in any case it's not a service pack.
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#18Bazooka_PenguinPosted 12/11/2013 8:58:51 PM
mrCube posted...
The fact that the kernel version has been updated (although it still shows 6.2 if you check the kernel version programatically) simply reflects Microsoft's new "rapid release" system. Kind of like how Firefox took something like 9 years to get to FireFox 4, and after just two years of their new release cycle, they're at FireFox 25. Version numbers mean nothing in a lot of cases.

The name Windows 8.1 was likely just to show people that the OS has gone through a major update and to take a second look at it, after the extreme amount of negative press it had upon release and during the months following.

There is one way that it's unlike a service pack, and that is that you can't do a clean install of 8.1 with a Windows 8 key. There are ways around that, but AFAIK you could use a Windows 7 key to install from a Windows 7 SP2 disk so I'm not sure was Microsoft's game was here.


Edit: I should also point out that you say that each version of Windows is based on a new major build revision, but in the very same sentence you point out that the difference between Vista and 7's kernel build number is a minor revision.


http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn302074%28v=vs.85%29.aspx
In Windows 8.1, the GetVersion(Ex) APIs have been deprecated. That means that while you can still call the APIs, if your app does not specifically target Windows 8.1, you will get Windows 8 versioning (6.2.0.0).
And no, it doesn't reflect a new "rapid release" system. The entire point of such a system is to act as a marketing tool. That isn't the case with the kernel versioning.

If MS had really followed a "rapid release" convention then it should be naming of the OS that should have changed. It would be Windows 9, instead of 8.1.

You know how it's also unlike a service pack? New kernel in general, new components: DXGI 1.3, WDDM 1.3, among other things all of which are software changes found between new versions of Windows since Vista (those components didn't exist before). It also features a new revision of DX, which only happened once with a SP since Vista.

It's really of no consequence to argue semantics. Since kernel 6.0 every new version of Windows has been based on a minor version change of the kernel, whereas SP usually only indicate change in build number.
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#19Bazooka_PenguinPosted 12/11/2013 9:02:13 PM
mrCube posted...
Hey bazooka can you just stick to one set of stupid arguments to blindly defend per topic? Thanks


Why, you going to go cry about me to someone else? Right. It's time to drop it. Feel free to respond and then say you win or what not.
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#20mrCubePosted 12/11/2013 9:05:52 PM
Microsoft's own website classifies it as a service pack/update and not a new version so I'm not sure why you're still arguing about it.
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