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Building a new PC, advice on CrossFire?

#1RingsOfUranusPosted 12/16/2013 5:47:06 PM
I've never done CrossFire before, I'm building a new PC (House got struck by lightning, blew up electronics, insurance check a' comin', etc) and so far I've got an AMD 8350 and an ASUS m5A99FX pro mobo, now I'm looking at video cards and figured, why not, let's try CrossFire. No idea how to go about doing this though. Any suggestions regarding things I should know and recommended cards? I'm thinking two 7970s or 7950s, but not really decided on anything. I'd like to stay around $500-$600 total on the cards if possible. If that's not possible, I'll just go more all-out on one card. Halp?
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"I'm excited to see what don't has for the ps4" -HomieKnockout
#2RingsOfUranus(Topic Creator)Posted 12/16/2013 5:57:37 PM
Now I'm lookin' at this guy, never heard of the R series before. http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814202047 How do these compare to the 6000, 7000 and 8000 series Radeon cards?
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Official Gengar of the Pokemon X board
"I'm excited to see what don't has for the ps4" -HomieKnockout
#3Flaktrooper123Posted 12/16/2013 6:06:58 PM
If you want R9 280x, you might have wished to have bought it a month ago. No thanks to bitcoin miners. They used to cost around $300 but it is now $400. R9 280X is the same thing as 7970 GHz edition, it is just a rebrand. Unless you are interested in bitcoin mining yourself, GTX 770 is now cheaper, it used to be more expensive than R9 280X.

If you don't want to crossfire now, you can up one level, you can get R9 290 for around $500, R9 290X for about $550-600 (dang bitcoin miners), or GTX 780 for $500-600.
#4ShubPosted 12/16/2013 6:11:11 PM
Forget about 6000 and 8000 series cards.
6000 series are old and no one should be buying one.
8000 series never made it to the world of desktops.
7000 series are the last generation, while the R cards are the latest. They come in various flavors, best thing you can do is look up reviews of the R9 270X and go from there. But I can tell you the R9 280X is roughly equivalent to a 7970.
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#5chase1234lifePosted 12/16/2013 6:19:52 PM
As someone who bought a 7950 just before the mining craze... stay away from AMD until at least next year. I got my card just days before they ramped up in price.

Though I'm extremely happy with it, there is no reason to pay $350-500 for a 7xxx or R9 series.

770 is a good bet if you need a GPU now, but if you wait until early next year when the supply is up, and demand down, an R9 is a good investment.

As far as Crossfire/SLI, personally, I say stay away unless you're using multiple monitors, a 1440p or higher resolution (and even for 1440p, a single high end card will do well), or are doing video production/editing. Otherwise, you're going to go through a lot of hassel (and expense) for minimal gain. Remember that running two cards will require twice the power, and most likely a higher wattage (and more expensive) PSU.

Also, as a current AMD user with Nvidia past... SLI>>>>Crossfire
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#6cmincPosted 12/16/2013 7:05:33 PM
chase1234life posted...
As someone who bought a 7950 just before the mining craze... stay away from AMD until at least next year. I got my card just days before they ramped up in price.

Though I'm extremely happy with it, there is no reason to pay $350-500 for a 7xxx or R9 series.

770 is a good bet if you need a GPU now, but if you wait until early next year when the supply is up, and demand down, an R9 is a good investment.

As far as Crossfire/SLI, personally, I say stay away unless you're using multiple monitors, a 1440p or higher resolution (and even for 1440p, a single high end card will do well), or are doing video production/editing. Otherwise, you're going to go through a lot of hassel (and expense) for minimal gain. Remember that running two cards will require twice the power, and most likely a higher wattage (and more expensive) PSU.

Also, as a current AMD user with Nvidia past... SLI>>>>Crossfire


I speak from absolutely no experience, but everything ive read over the last week from reputable sources backs up what this gentleman just said. Unless youre doing double monitors, and sometimes even then, one really really good card will often treat you better than two 'kinda-okay' cards. Thats probably true with women, too, come to think of it.
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#7RingsOfUranus(Topic Creator)Posted 12/16/2013 7:44:20 PM
I do run multiple monitors, actually, but I've always done it with one card before. But if Crossfire doesn't offer much of an advantage I can just skip it. Off topic, what in the world is Bitcoin mining and what does it have to do with AMD in particular? Also thanks for the replies so far, I do need a new PC ASAP though. My PC is like, my hub for 80% of my life. Entertainment (Games) + Work (Photo editing, I'm a semi-professional photographer and the lack of income is no bueno) + Mostly play/work (Also my music work station) + pr0n
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Official Gengar of the Pokemon X board
"I'm excited to see what don't has for the ps4" -HomieKnockout
#8chase1234lifePosted 12/16/2013 8:23:24 PM
RingsOfUranus posted...
I do run multiple monitors, actually, but I've always done it with one card before. But if Crossfire doesn't offer much of an advantage I can just skip it. Off topic, what in the world is Bitcoin mining and what does it have to do with AMD in particular? Also thanks for the replies so far, I do need a new PC ASAP though. My PC is like, my hub for 80% of my life. Entertainment (Games) + Work (Photo editing, I'm a semi-professional photographer and the lack of income is no bueno) + Mostly play/work (Also my music work station) + pr0n


I can only say what I know about mining. AMD was cheaper, ran more efficiently, offered better performance at less cost (especially in power consumption), and were more compatible with mining programs thanks to their use of OpenCL rather than CUDA (which isn't as widely supported/open source). So they had a plurality of advantages over Nvidia, with the most important being price (for example, I purchased my 7950 for $230ish, with 3 free games, where as the Nvidia equivalent would have cost $400 and no incentive of free games).

Mining is done by solving mathematical computations. With each calculation solved, the level of math goes up.

So for example, your first computation might be 2+2, the second, 35+86, the third, 20x6, fourth, 3762/67, and so forth until you re doing graduate level calculus based on sub atomic algorithims.

Starting out, it's easy to mine a bit of money, but laws of diminishing return start kicking in quite quickly, especially when you add in the cost of equiptment and electrical power. Not to mention the life-span killing effort mining takes on your components.

As long as you're not running 2 or 3 monitors over 1080p, don't even think about dual cards. A single high end card will still net you 60fps on average, maybe 30 under supe heavy load on a dual monitor set-up.

Introducing linked cards causes issues such as de-synched video, more prominent tearing, microstutter, and a slew of software/driver issues and compatibility. Nvidia does much better with these issues than AMD, but they're still present.
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#9RingsOfUranus(Topic Creator)Posted 12/16/2013 8:39:10 PM
chase1234life posted...
RingsOfUranus posted...
I do run multiple monitors, actually, but I've always done it with one card before. But if Crossfire doesn't offer much of an advantage I can just skip it. Off topic, what in the world is Bitcoin mining and what does it have to do with AMD in particular? Also thanks for the replies so far, I do need a new PC ASAP though. My PC is like, my hub for 80% of my life. Entertainment (Games) + Work (Photo editing, I'm a semi-professional photographer and the lack of income is no bueno) + Mostly play/work (Also my music work station) + pr0n


I can only say what I know about mining. AMD was cheaper, ran more efficiently, offered better performance at less cost (especially in power consumption), and were more compatible with mining programs thanks to their use of OpenCL rather than CUDA (which isn't as widely supported/open source). So they had a plurality of advantages over Nvidia, with the most important being price (for example, I purchased my 7950 for $230ish, with 3 free games, where as the Nvidia equivalent would have cost $400 and no incentive of free games).

Mining is done by solving mathematical computations. With each calculation solved, the level of math goes up.

So for example, your first computation might be 2+2, the second, 35+86, the third, 20x6, fourth, 3762/67, and so forth until you re doing graduate level calculus based on sub atomic algorithims.

Starting out, it's easy to mine a bit of money, but laws of diminishing return start kicking in quite quickly, especially when you add in the cost of equiptment and electrical power. Not to mention the life-span killing effort mining takes on your components.

As long as you're not running 2 or 3 monitors over 1080p, don't even think about dual cards. A single high end card will still net you 60fps on average, maybe 30 under supe heavy load on a dual monitor set-up.

Introducing linked cards causes issues such as de-synched video, more prominent tearing, microstutter, and a slew of software/driver issues and compatibility. Nvidia does much better with these issues than AMD, but they're still present.


Thanks for all the info, I think I'm gonna' go with a single R9 270x, now that I've read up more on the R series cards, seems like enough for what I'll need anyway.
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Official Gengar of the Pokemon X board
"I'm excited to see what don't has for the ps4" -HomieKnockout