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IT, Network System Admin, Comp Repair...

#31MadPinoRagePosted 12/18/2013 4:23:35 PM
If you or your friend is having any trouble in math, then try looking up khan academy, patrickjmt, or just type in the kind of problem's concept into the youtube search bar for video tutorials. Learning the concepts is easy. Memorizing them and applying them to ridiculous problems is the hard part. A lot of the math is ridiculous, but it is suppose to train you how to think logically and tackle seemingly difficult problems. When will you use trigonometric integration? Maybe never or a whole lot, or maybe you'll never come across that problem again. However, your brain will be up to snuff since you've tackled problems like that.
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Unthinking respect for authority is the greatest enemy of truth.
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#32Sc24lifePosted 12/18/2013 7:03:47 PM
Sc24life posted...
Could you all give some more insight into landing a good quality entry level IT job? I've been thinking of trying to occupy one of these positions during the spring semester for some extra cash. Any useful tips that a lot of people are unaware of regarding the process of finding good positions, acquiring good positions, and other related topics would be really helpful.


I know I'm being lazy at this point, and I do plan on googling information regarding this topic, but could someone give me a quick overview about favorable certifications? I don't know much about the topic, but don't some certifications take more time to earn? If so, what are some of the essential certifications that can be acquired within a short amount of time?
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#33ab2c4Posted 12/18/2013 9:12:14 PM(edited)
As someone who as been a Network Administrator for 17 years, unless you want to become Cisco certified and specialize in that (for example), I advise people to look into a different career. IT positions are typically underpaid, under appreciated, and over worked.

Then add in the fact that if you are in IT they think you know everything about everything. I get people from the company all the time calling me at home when they have car problems, their Blu Ray player isn't working like it should, dish washer is acting up, and the ever popular "I am having a problem with my teenage son, what should I do?". People literally think IT people are God like and experts on every single thing in this world. Then they get mad when you tell them you don't know anything about fixing cars, dishwashers, etc.

My advice: go into teaching, or medicine, become an electrician (that job actually pays really well), anything but IT.
#34lost_withinPosted 12/18/2013 9:15:16 PM
I have been doing professional IT, Computer Work, and network/server administration for the last 5 years... and rarely have to use my limited math skills, but on occasion I am glad that I do have some math skills, so I would say take as much math as you can stomach, but don't burden yourself with higher level math...
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#35HydroCannabinolPosted 12/18/2013 9:20:53 PM
ab2c4 posted...
As someone who as been a Network Administrator for 17 years, unless you want to become Cisco certified and specialize in that (for example), I advise people to look into a different career. IT positions are typically underpaid, under appreciated, and over worked.

Then add in the fact that if you are in IT they think you know everything about everything. I get people from the company all the time calling me at home when they have car problems, their Blu Ray player isn't working like it should, dish washer is acting up, and the ever popular "I am having a problem with my teenage son, what should I do?". People literally think IT people are God like and experts on every single thing in this world. Then they get mad when you tell them you don't know anything about fixing cars, dishwashers, etc.

My advice: go into teaching, or medicine, become an electrician (that job actually pays really well), anything but IT.


If you have customers calling you about issues unrelated to IT and you cannot handle them, it's your own fault. Grow a pair of balls dude.
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#36ShineboxerPosted 12/18/2013 9:26:13 PM
Just get certification and grind experience at a smaller gig.

I'm still going to school for CS but I'm doing it part time within a secure job.
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#37SolidKnightPosted 12/18/2013 9:28:29 PM(edited)
None of those require anything other than basic math skills.

What matters: certifications and experience.

Is a Computer Science degree useful? Not as far as knowledge and skills go. The only reason to get one is so some ignorant HR person doesn't throw your resume in the trash.
#38Worknofun370Posted 12/19/2013 9:48:50 AM
ein311 posted...
Worknofun370 posted...
I'd love to see an actual job listing requiring a CCIE that is only offering 40K Got a link?


At my last job I put up an opening for a Tier 1 grunt. I interviewed a CCIE that was asking for $38,000/year.

Fresno's IT scene is abysmal.


Damnnn

I gotta ask Lab or just written? Cause if that was Lab... dude must have had some type of mental issue to only ask that much. Out here (Southeast Michigan) CCIE's, even just written, are all 6 figure positions.

ab2c4 posted...
As someone who as been a Network Administrator for 17 years, unless you want to become Cisco certified and specialize in that (for example), I advise people to look into a different career. IT positions are typically underpaid, under appreciated, and over worked.



That's not an IT thing, that's a position specific thing. If you work for a company that overworks you, under pays you, and doesn't show you any appreciation... that's on your company, not the position.


I've worked in IT for 12 years now (time freaking flies). I do not feel i'm underpaid, I constantly hear feedback from people about how much they appreciate the things I do, and I work between 40-50 hour weeks. 50-60 hour weeks when i'm on pager.

Granted, that's a very anecdotal example, but it's simply an attempt to show that those traits are not everywhere in the IT world.


As for people calling you all the time thinking you know everything... yeahhh, never had that one happen to me either. I've certainly had people ask my opinion on things, but not once has someone ever called me at home to ask my opinion on a topic. If they did I'd tell them to **** off.
#39Worknofun370Posted 12/19/2013 9:50:34 AM
SolidKnight posted...
None of those require anything other than basic math skills.

What matters: certifications and experience.

Is a Computer Science degree useful? Not as far as knowledge and skills go. The only reason to get one is so some ignorant HR person doesn't throw your resume in the trash.



We've already been over this in this topic. A degree is stronger than certifications, and there is no ifs ands or buts about it.

A CS Degree isn't as strong as other degrees, where you can't get your foot in the door without one. But it's still vastly better than a certification.
#40SolidKnightPosted 12/19/2013 9:58:18 AM
Worknofun370 posted...
SolidKnight posted...
None of those require anything other than basic math skills.

What matters: certifications and experience.

Is a Computer Science degree useful? Not as far as knowledge and skills go. The only reason to get one is so some ignorant HR person doesn't throw your resume in the trash.



We've already been over this in this topic. A degree is stronger than certifications, and there is no ifs ands or buts about it.

A CS Degree isn't as strong as other degrees, where you can't get your foot in the door without one. But it's still vastly better than a certification.


I've seen people willing to compromise on degrees but never a certification.