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Which monitor? (IPS vs 144Hz)

#21AltmadragonPosted 12/27/2013 4:05:14 PM
SythisTaru posted...
Actually human eye can only see 24, it's fact. Look it up.


Wrong, if you set up a screen to play 45 images in 1 second you would see all 45, you might not fully know or remember what you saw but you will see all 45.

Don't know where you got your fact.
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#22The cranky hermitPosted 12/27/2013 4:10:15 PM
Some people say movies on a 120hz monitor are vastly superior to 60hz. I've never looked for the difference myself but it makes sense, there's no way to divide 60 by 24 cleanly but you can do it with 120

Chances are they aren't talking about dividing 24 into 120. The standard way of having a 24Hz movie on a 60Hz monitor is to use something called 3:2 pulldown - basically, have odd frames show 3 times in a row, and even frames twice in a row. This introduces a very slight jitter that isn't present at all in cinema, or on a display with a multiple of 24. Eliminating it is nice, but not even close to "vastly superior." You get used to the jitter, and just don't get bothered by it. Chances are you have watched plenty of 24Hz films on 60Hz displays and not noticed it's there. VHS tapes have a far worse jitter effect - every fourth frame is repeated - and most don't even notice that.

What *is* extremely noticeable is the frame interpolation thing that Cinder6 is talking about. And it's a horrible, horrible effect - nobody should ever use it. Movies aren't shot at 120 distinct frames per second, so trying to fake 96 extra frames so that they look like they were destroys the intended look of the movie.

your 120hz tv isn't actually 120hz. It's 60hz and creates its own inbetween images to make a fake 120hz
that's why it looks bad for you

The source is still 24Hz. Having a "real" 120Hz monitor isn't going to magically make it possible for movies to display naturally at that frame rate. The best you can do is use 5:5 pulldown, which is what a 120Hz TV does when the frame interpolation effect is turned off.
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