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Say goodbye to the traditional ways of assembling your rig in the near future

#31DV8ingSourcesPosted 1/7/2014 5:10:43 PM
I can seriously imagine a future where if you wanted to show off a game or something at a friends, you could just grab the hdd/sdd module and maybe your high end gpu module and pop over to a friends and be done with a swap in seconds. I really like the idea but I do echo the concerns behind Razer promoting it. If there is no money to be made in the idea, it won't be done and the best way to make money in the short term at the very least is to make things proprietary requiring licensing.
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#32ArsenicSteelPosted 1/7/2014 5:25:47 PM(edited)
DV8ingSources posted...
ArsenicSteel posted...
Intel is already approaching on mobo cpu's... Why is it such a stretch to add in on board ram as part of the module as well? RAM CPU and MOBO features all need to be balanced together anyways. Having great ram and a weak mobo or cpu completely defeats the purpose. There would still be different tiers of hardware but they'd just be integrated already. This integration can actual pay performance gains as the engineering has one less step to worry about. Direct contact components can be done in a way that provides other benefits. Maybe have ram pools directly attached to the cpu for faster transfer...


There's a lot of RAM makers out there and there's a chance one might think RAM from one maker is more reliable then RAM from another maker or maybe money is an issue and a person can afford a good processor but need to upgrade RAM at a later date. Just tossing everything together is nice if a user that is knowledgeable has a say in what goes where. This modular concept seems to just address the woes of the average Joe.

Intel can investigate all they like. Their interest does not validate the notion of modular PCs anymore than Razer or your opinion to me.

Again you are treating this like a product. This is an idea. One that can easily work in the future. This isn't something hitting the store shelves in 2 years time.



I am treating this concept with a bit of reasoning that goes beyond perfect case scenarios.
Every manufacturer agreeing to encapsulate their components is not something that will easily work in the future. Such a module would increase shipping costs for manufactures that make small components and that's not even mentioning the how their production would impacted.

Easy. That's a four letter word dreamers utter too quickly.
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#33doctoglethorpePosted 1/7/2014 5:19:24 PM
DV8ingSources posted...
I can seriously imagine a future where if you wanted to show off a game or something at a friends, you could just grab the hdd/sdd module and maybe your high end gpu module and pop over to a friends and be done with a swap in seconds. I really like the idea but I do echo the concerns behind Razer promoting it. If there is no money to be made in the idea, it won't be done and the best way to make money in the short term at the very least is to make things proprietary requiring licensing.



1) Thats already modern thinking, its called the cloud. (I didn't name it) You don't need to physically transport games anymore. Making a transportable HDD module is backwards thinking already.

2) Just because profit is possible doesn't mean enough people will buy it to make the R&D worth it. Again, we're talking a sliver of a niche at best here. People who want to manually assemble, but also are okay with spending more thus defeating the biggest reason to manually assemble, and also want something easier to assemble, defeating the other biggest reason (gadget tinkering). Who is this really for? Would anyone here honestly pay $500 for a GTX770 thats basically is no different aside from not needing to plug in power cables? Thats what were talking about here.
#34DV8ingSourcesPosted 1/7/2014 5:26:03 PM
doctoglethorpe posted...
its called the cloud


That has physical limitations that will never be fully addressed. The internet will never be able to have as little input latency as a local physical device will.

2) Just because profit is possible doesn't mean enough people will buy it to make the R&D worth it. Again, we're talking a sliver of a niche at best here. People who want to manually assemble, but also are okay with spending more thus defeating the biggest reason to manually assemble, and also want something easier to assemble, defeating the other biggest reason (gadget tinkering). Who is this really for? Would anyone here honestly pay $500 for a GTX770 thats basically is no different aside from not needing to plug in power cables? Thats what were talking about here.


Again I'm not in anyway saying this will EVER happen. I'm just saying its a great idea. Your 770 example is a poor one because for this to work this would have to be a standard and all new products would need to fit into the standard. The appeal is that upgrades are seamless, the hardware can be faster because it wouldn't need to be designed around user accessibility internally, and the entire pc would be plug and play in the true sense of the phrase.
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#35KillerTrufflePosted 1/7/2014 5:27:29 PM
Done properly (not encasing everything in large, bulky housing, necessarily), I don't think manufacturing costs would be significantly increased for the most part. RAM manufacturers already attach heat spreaders - sometimes bulky ones. GPU manufacturers are already putting plastic shells around the coolers. Hot-swappable cartridge-based hard drive housings have been around for years and don't have a significant cost.

Honestly, the technology and systems are largely already in place - nearly any component *could* be easily adapted to a simplified module. The biggest key I think would be designing new motherboards and power supplies so that all power is sent to the motherboard, and distributed from there (combined with data) through single connectors to each component as needed.

I do think Razer's design is far too bulky and expensive to be realistic, but that's to be expected - it's Razer.
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#36KillerTrufflePosted 1/7/2014 5:29:44 PM
DV8ingSources posted...
That has physical limitations that will never be fully addressed. The internet will never be able to have as little input latency as a local physical device will.


Careful about saying "never"... that's come back to bite one or two people in the technology world before. ;) The cloud is *currently* nowhere near capable of providing local drive performance. It could easily happen down the road - even widespread fiber could make it more feasible, and if they ever sort out quantum computing, that could seal the deal.
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"How do I get rid of a Trojan Horse?" -Sailor_Kakashi
"Leave it outside the gates of Troy overnight." -Davel23
#37DV8ingSourcesPosted 1/7/2014 5:30:17 PM
ArsenicSteel posted...
Easy. That's a four letter word dreamers utter too quickly.


Except it would be easy from a physical standpoint. It would involve a complete industry overhaul but it wouldn't be hard. It's just no one can ever agree on what standards are best and end up with their own. The end result is the fragmented industry we have now with constantly changing architectures and standards that already require all the manufacturers compliance anyways.

End of the day, it won't happen because everyone is out for a bigger piece of the pie and they all have their own ideas on how to do that.
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#38DV8ingSourcesPosted 1/7/2014 5:31:06 PM
KillerTruffle posted...
DV8ingSources posted...
That has physical limitations that will never be fully addressed. The internet will never be able to have as little input latency as a local physical device will.


Careful about saying "never"... that's come back to bite one or two people in the technology world before. ;) The cloud is *currently* nowhere near capable of providing local drive performance. It could easily happen down the road - even widespread fiber could make it more feasible, and if they ever sort out quantum computing, that could seal the deal.


I say that because the speed of light and electricity are one in the same for the most part. Unless there is a new transmission medium, it just won't be physically possible.
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#39fire2boxPosted 1/7/2014 5:34:25 PM
because every niche product from razer has *ALWAYS* changed the world?
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#40exclusiveburnerPosted 1/7/2014 5:35:06 PM
I'm kinda surprised Razer is still in business.