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Mouse DPI setting for Batman?

#11_GRIM_FANDANGO_Posted 3/15/2014 11:03:02 AM
Mouse DPI setting only affects how many pixels your cursor moves when you move the mouse sensor 1 inch across a surface. However, it is not the only thing that affects your sensitivity.

Your overall sensitivity is [mouse DPI]*[windows sensitivity setting]*[ingame sensitivity setting]

So stating which DPI you use is kind of pointless, since that really gives little indication what sensitivity you are playing at. With a decent sensor, the DPI you use should not affect the quality of tracking, though this is often not true. High DPI settings that are not native to the sensor and attained through interpolation often have issues. For example, larger amounts of jitter are associated with these kind of high DPI settings.

Generally, in games that do not require pinpoint precision (like an FPS) but you just want the freedom to move and look around without much effort, higher levels of sensitivity are preferred.
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I5 3570 | GTX 760 | FILCO Majestouch 2 tenkeyless | Zowie EC1 Evo White | Asus Xonar DGX | Kingston 120 GB SSD | Sennheiser HD 518 | Samsung S24A350H
#12Spawn_LOLs(Topic Creator)Posted 3/15/2014 1:26:47 PM
_GRIM_FANDANGO_ posted...
Mouse DPI setting only affects how many pixels your cursor moves when you move the mouse sensor 1 inch across a surface. However, it is not the only thing that affects your sensitivity.

Your overall sensitivity is [mouse DPI]*[windows sensitivity setting]*[ingame sensitivity setting]

So stating which DPI you use is kind of pointless, since that really gives little indication what sensitivity you are playing at. With a decent sensor, the DPI you use should not affect the quality of tracking, though this is often not true. High DPI settings that are not native to the sensor and attained through interpolation often have issues. For example, larger amounts of jitter are associated with these kind of high DPI settings.

Generally, in games that do not require pinpoint precision (like an FPS) but you just want the freedom to move and look around without much effort, higher levels of sensitivity are preferred.


Wouldnt you need better precision to get head shots and such?
#13Spawn_LOLs(Topic Creator)Posted 3/16/2014 12:31:28 AM
bump
#14_GRIM_FANDANGO_Posted 3/16/2014 6:46:44 AM(edited)
Spawn_LOLs posted...
_GRIM_FANDANGO_ posted...
Mouse DPI setting only affects how many pixels your cursor moves when you move the mouse sensor 1 inch across a surface. However, it is not the only thing that affects your sensitivity.

Your overall sensitivity is [mouse DPI]*[windows sensitivity setting]*[ingame sensitivity setting]

So stating which DPI you use is kind of pointless, since that really gives little indication what sensitivity you are playing at. With a decent sensor, the DPI you use should not affect the quality of tracking, though this is often not true. High DPI settings that are not native to the sensor and attained through interpolation often have issues. For example, larger amounts of jitter are associated with these kind of high DPI settings.

Generally, in games that do not require pinpoint precision (like an FPS) but you just want the freedom to move and look around without much effort, higher levels of sensitivity are preferred.


Wouldnt you need better precision to get head shots and such?


Sorry, I meant for games that do not require pinpoint decision (precision like you need in an FPS)

It was really poorly worded. My bad. In FPS of course a lot of people play with lower sensitivities. If you look at the Quake and Counter Strike competitive scenes, most of the well-known players use a sensitivity way below that of the average player. To give an indication, ~500 DPI, windows 6/11 (or alternatively, "raw input" on), and an ingame sensitivity between 1.5-3.5 is a common setup in CS:GO .
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I5 3570 | GTX 760 | FILCO Majestouch 2 tenkeyless | Zowie EC1 Evo White | Asus Xonar DGX | Kingston 120 GB SSD | Sennheiser HD 518 | Samsung S24A350H
#15Kokuei05Posted 3/16/2014 7:02:07 AM
400
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Xeon x3220 @ 3.3Ghz [367*9] | Hyper 212 EVO | GA-EP45-UD3L | Mushkin 4GB DDR2-800 | EA-430W | 1GB 560 AC Twin Turbo II | WD 500 GB | AL1916W | G400s | HTF600-S
#16Spawn_LOLs(Topic Creator)Posted 3/16/2014 11:21:13 AM
_GRIM_FANDANGO_ posted...
Spawn_LOLs posted...
_GRIM_FANDANGO_ posted...
Mouse DPI setting only affects how many pixels your cursor moves when you move the mouse sensor 1 inch across a surface. However, it is not the only thing that affects your sensitivity.

Your overall sensitivity is [mouse DPI]*[windows sensitivity setting]*[ingame sensitivity setting]

So stating which DPI you use is kind of pointless, since that really gives little indication what sensitivity you are playing at. With a decent sensor, the DPI you use should not affect the quality of tracking, though this is often not true. High DPI settings that are not native to the sensor and attained through interpolation often have issues. For example, larger amounts of jitter are associated with these kind of high DPI settings.

Generally, in games that do not require pinpoint precision (like an FPS) but you just want the freedom to move and look around without much effort, higher levels of sensitivity are preferred.


Wouldnt you need better precision to get head shots and such?


Sorry, I meant for games that do not require pinpoint decision (precision like you need in an FPS)

It was really poorly worded. My bad. In FPS of course a lot of people play with lower sensitivities. If you look at the Quake and Counter Strike competitive scenes, most of the well-known players use a sensitivity way below that of the average player. To give an indication, ~500 DPI, windows 6/11 (or alternatively, "raw input" on), and an ingame sensitivity between 1.5-3.5 is a common setup in CS:GO .


Thanks for the detailed answer!