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How does one break a PC/Internet addiction? (serious thread)

#61BogePosted 3/19/2014 10:19:51 PM
I'm not sure you can call it an addiction or mental illness if you can just "man up" and take care of it yourself.
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#62Vindication123Posted 3/19/2014 11:02:34 PM
Try this:

Work Hard, Study Hard, Party Hard.

Or you could read good books. Man, if I pick up a good book...I'll will for sure not go outside for a few days.
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#63phy2jshPosted 3/19/2014 11:06:30 PM
DaedalusEx posted...
In the 50's they hooked up the brains of rats to machines which stimulated their norephedrine pathways after they pressed a button so many times. It felt so good to the rats that they stopped eating and mating, and literally pushed the button until they died.

Point being, I think anyone suggesting willpower or "manning up" as a way to overcome addiction has a very poor understanding of neurobiology.


OMG, is this a serious post? You're citing a random experiment on rats from the 50s? So I guess this proves it is impossible to overcome an addiction through your own actions and willpower? Totally irresponsible post.

Most people in this thread moaning about my reference to Manning up are completely missing the point. What I'm saying is that you need to take full responsibility for your own recovery. It's fine to ask for support (this is very beneficial), but asking for the solution when it's obvious just makes it clear you aren't serious about your recovery. People say you need to hit rock bottom before you can give up; want this really means is that it's very difficult to recover from a serious addiction until you really want to and make a strong decision to get it sorted ie. Until you have manned up.

None of the above is meant to suggest it is easy to recover from an addiction. I have failed to give up smoking several times, but what I do know is that the magical solutions (patches, e-cigarettes etc) whilst they can help will not do the job for you; your willpower has to be the driving force.
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#64phy2jshPosted 3/19/2014 11:10:46 PM
Boge posted...
I'm not sure you can call it an addiction or mental illness if you can just "man up" and take care of it yourself.


So, none of the millions of people who have quit smoking without intervention were never addicted?

Your situation sounds terrible and I feel for you, but I do think there is a difference between mental illness and addiction. In addiction, the solution is usually obvious, but achieving it is difficult - remove the stimulus for long enough and the addiction will fade. In your case, it sounds like it's difficult to even know what the solution is.
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#65PhilOnDezPosted 3/20/2014 6:50:00 AM
phy2jsh posted...
DaedalusEx posted...
In the 50's they hooked up the brains of rats to machines which stimulated their norephedrine pathways after they pressed a button so many times. It felt so good to the rats that they stopped eating and mating, and literally pushed the button until they died.

Point being, I think anyone suggesting willpower or "manning up" as a way to overcome addiction has a very poor understanding of neurobiology.


OMG, is this a serious post? You're citing a random experiment on rats from the 50s? So I guess this proves it is impossible to overcome an addiction through your own actions and willpower? Totally irresponsible post.

None of the above is meant to suggest it is easy to recover from an addiction. I have failed to give up smoking several times, but what I do know is that the magical solutions (patches, e-cigarettes etc) whilst they can help will not do the job for you; your willpower has to be the driving force.


They've done similar experiments on humans as well, the one I remember the most details of was an attempt to 'cure' homosexuality. The results were basically the same, the people in the study ended up ignoring everything else to the point where they were pressing the button thousands of times an hour. They were cut off before they could die but it basically proved that your brain doesn't care what's stimulating the reward center as long as it's being stimulated and if something stimulates it frequently at the press of a button (sound familiar?) it's easy to get hooked, even moreso if you have an addictive personality.

phy2jsh posted...
So, none of the millions of people who have quit smoking without intervention were never addicted?


Personally, I know two people who've overcome addictions, and only one of them who did it without full-on rehab, out of the dozens of people I'd consider addicts in one way or another that I know (I'm not including myself even though I probably count, I never considered myself addicted to WoW but I did spend 4-8 hours a weekday and 8-12 on weekends for 6 years. The reason I don't consider myself ever having been addicted is because when I decided to quit two years ago I quit and haven't even had an urge to look back. Feel free to judge, I couldn't care less, especially now that I don't play).

The first is a woman who quit smoking. She did it without much support aside from a team of cardiologists telling her if she didn't quit she was going to die. She had a massive heart attack at 35 and her recovery involved several surgeries and tons of medication. She wasn't overweight (maybe 110 pounds) and had literally nothing else to blame the heart attack on. That's what it took for her to quit.

The other is a guy who was stabbed 3 times in college and ended up addicted to opiates while in the hospital. For him to get clean it took losing his job, getting arrested, and forced into rehab.

These are the two 'success' stories I have to share personally out of the dozens of smokers, several alcoholics, and handful of 'other' users that I know. They got hooked on things that just happened to be addictive. MMOs, Facebook, browser games, these people have psychologists on staff full time in order to make their products as addictive as humanly possible. I'm not trying to say its impossible to quit any of the above on your own, in fact I know that it's possible because I've read about people who did it. I'm just saying that those people are few and far between, if they weren't it would be a lot harder for me to find an AA meeting (I don't drink at all, just an example) but there's three groups in my small town that all meet daily.
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#66nophoriaPosted 3/20/2014 6:59:50 AM
Holy hell, are we already to this state in today's age? People posting crap like this? You think there is a way out of everything beyond the obvious? Stop going on your computer, this isn't heroin.
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#67JrTapia1991Posted 3/20/2014 9:09:03 AM
when you're that down and low getting told to just man up acting all macho is about the worst thing in the world and just makes the person feel worse about themselves. Not everybody is as mentally strong as you claim to be....sorry we're not all perfect.

I can't help with the addiction tc, I have it myself....I suppose it's better than what other young people are doing my age, alcoholics, chain smokers, pill heads,junkies, spitting out 3 welfare kids by early 20s by different daddies...doesn't help there's nothing to do in my town. Every person's situation is different. I see the internet as a great way to escape this sorry ass world.
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#68phy2jshPosted 3/20/2014 9:17:08 AM
@PhilOnDez

I'm not sure the point you're trying to make with your top example. You don't provide much detail on the nature of the experiment (or any reference), but what you do describe doesn't seem to have much relation to addition in the real world. Irrespective, I don't think there is any dispute that it is difficult, or impossible, for some people to shake their addictions (I've said this several times). However, this, in no way, changes the point I'm trying to make, which is that willpower and commitment must be at the centre of any successful escape from addiction.

The rest of your post just backs up my point ie. it is difficult but not impossible to escape from addiction, and if you are going to escape, willpower and strong commitment are key.
#69phy2jshPosted 3/20/2014 9:23:58 AM
JrTapia1991 posted...
when you're that down and low getting told to just man up acting all macho is about the worst thing in the world and just makes the person feel worse about themselves. Not everybody is as mentally strong as you claim to be....sorry we're not all perfect.

I can't help with the addiction tc, I have it myself....I suppose it's better than what other young people are doing my age, alcoholics, chain smokers, pill heads,junkies, spitting out 3 welfare kids by early 20s by different daddies...doesn't help there's nothing to do in my town. Every person's situation is different. I see the internet as a great way to escape this sorry ass world.


It's not about acting macho. It's about realising the world is **** and no one is going to solve your problems for you. Fine to ask for help, but you need to take ultimate responsibility. And when I say 'you', I'm just speaking generally!
#70PhilOnDezPosted 3/20/2014 9:47:49 AM
@phy2jsh

How does 'pressing a button for instant gratification' not describe the Internet to a T? That wasn't so much a response to addiction being hard to break as it was to you saying that an experiment on rats in the 50s proved nothing in relation to humans in the current day. 'Internet addiction' might be too general a term, I wouldn't disagree with that, but I've seen firsthand and heard second/third hand how much damage the compulsion to spend time online can cause. It's not the gangrenous limbs of Krokodil or cancer of smoking but it can most definitely be the lost jobs of recreational drug use (marijuana, painkillers) or broken relationships of LSD/Heroine/Alcohol.

Saying that Internet addiction isn't a thing because [insert flawed reasoning here] is like saying gambling can't be an addiction and any psychologist will flat-out tell you you're wrong.

My earlier posts, and even the bulk of this one, aren't necessarily directed at you or meant to disagree with you (aside from the experiment not relating to humans, which, while true, the results were mirrored in human tests) even if I didn't agree completely, I did quote you in them as I just wanted to add something to the points made in those posts.
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