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How do you "create" your own internet cable?

#21SlaynPosted 4/24/2014 8:43:54 PM
I didn't see he had a cable in his bedroom. I thought he just wanted to run the existing cable to another room. Seeing his latest post, this is probably what he needs to do anyway.

After fully reading again, I would say save yourself the hassle and get a powerline adapter kit. It basically plugs in to one power wall socket in your house and sends the signal to another part of the house. So ethernet from your router to your power socket, then another power socket now has a plug with ethernet out. I think they even make ones with wifi if you need more than just a single ethernet cord.

Something like this:

http://www.amazon.com/Linksys-Powerline-Wireless-Extender-PLWK400/dp/B0087O6AQE

About as expensive as the cable guy to come out, but at least you'd have internet on all sides now.
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#22zerodefectPosted 4/27/2014 12:44:43 PM(edited)
WerdnAndreW posted...
A splitter is fine... How do you think the cable company does it? To do multiple runs, use a 2 way splitter first. One goes to the modem and the other hooks up to another splitter which connects to multiple cable boxes.


I know how a cable company does it.

The signal is either boosted/attenuated before the tap/splitter directly from the drop to compensate for the insertion loss/attenuation added by the splitter. Most cable modems want forward path power levels at +/-11dbmv, a splitter is going to drop that by about -3.5 to -7dbmv. If your RF already sucks (as do a lot of subscribers), you're just asking for problems. If the tech didn't install the splitter, then you shouldn't be adding one.

Many techs are dispatched for repairs where a subscriber has added some sort of splitter or booster and wonder why they have packet loss / slow speeds / high BER's or intermittent sync issues. A customer should not be adding any CPE in-line unless they know what they are doing.
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#23LvthnPosted 4/27/2014 1:02:53 PM
I make them professionally.

You need:

- Side cutters
- Strippers (for coax)
- Fittings (to the right size cable, probably RG6)
- Compressors (for fittings)

It's very easy to do but I advise against using material bought from consumer outlets to do wiring, just as an example if your splitter isn't rated for the full bandwidth your carrier uses, you can screw up everything past that splitter. Same goes for cable, even barrel bolts (F-81 connectors), ground blocks, etc.

If you have bad cable or need an outlet call your carrier, it's usually free if bad cable and $50 or so if new outlet. The tools alone are probably going to run you $40 or so, nevermind a spool of RG6 ($50/1000ft warehouse price, usually, much more consumer price, as much as $10 for 6 ft).
#24LvthnPosted 4/27/2014 1:05:07 PM
zerodefect posted...
WerdnAndreW posted...
A splitter is fine... How do you think the cable company does it? To do multiple runs, use a 2 way splitter first. One goes to the modem and the other hooks up to another splitter which connects to multiple cable boxes.


I know how a cable company does it.

The signal is either boosted/attenuated before the tap/splitter directly from the drop to compensate for the insertion loss/attenuation added by the splitter. Most cable modems want forward path power levels at +/-11dbmv, a splitter is going to drop that by about -3.5 to -7dbmv. If your RF already sucks (as do a lot of subscribers), you're just asking for problems. If the tech didn't install the splitter, then you shouldn't be adding one.

Many techs are dispatched for repairs where a subscriber has added some sort of splitter or booster and wonder why they have packet loss / slow speeds / high BER's or intermittent sync issues. A customer should not be adding any CPE in-line unless they know what they are doing.


This needed to be said. If you don't have full equipment and knowledge of what you're doing, your modifications can make a lot of work for someone else. Especially if you lie about doing it and pretend it must be an unrelated issue when the tech shows up.
#25BilliePilgrimPosted 4/27/2014 1:14:46 PM
zerodefect posted...
Don't put a splitter on a line going to a cable modem. You'd just be asking for trouble. An unterminated splitter could play havoc with the RF signal (reflection, ingress, attenuation, etc.)


Shhhh.... Be quiet now.

Anyway, splitter would work. That's how they had my TV and modem connected at the same time at my old apartment. I would like to mention as well that it functioned perfectly for years like that as well. Only thing I would mind is that you're not running these cables too far. Shouldn't be an issue, but as far as I know you're some baller with a 30,000 sq ft house.
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