This is a split board - You can return to the Split List for other boards.

"Used games hurt devs" What does Steam sales do?

#41TheEntitledOnePosted 4/30/2014 8:20:33 AM(edited)
Despite Steam sales being very popular, the irony is that full-price games still seem to sell well. Right now, Dark Souls II, Day Z, Watch Dogs, and Arma III are all visible on the top sellers list with no discount. Steam doesn't ever release the figures, but I take reports of PC revenue growing, influx of new releases and the thriving indie scene as evidence that Steam sales aren't hurting the industry much, if at all.

Actually, they are helping as far as I'm concerned.
---
I got your number! I got all your numbers!
#42DarkZV2BetaPosted 4/30/2014 8:21:28 AM
AsucaHayashi posted...
godplaysSNES posted...
It takes a long time for popular games to get big discounts. Take Skyrim for example.


this annoys me... it's a fact they get more per unit sold on PC and yet they treat PC in the same league as console in order to maximize profits usually with a starting price of $60(just because and definitely not out of necessity) with rare discounts that only go up to a certain point.

something i like to call too big and arrogant for their own good.


So stop buying into it.

"How dare a company try to make as much money as possible, as they are legally obligated to do! They should make less money to suit MY interests!"
---
god invented extension cords. -elchris79
Starcraft 2 has no depth or challenge -GoreGross
#43LvthnPosted 4/30/2014 8:22:03 AM
Steam sales are the smart answer to used games. Why pay $10 for a sketchy looking disk in a junked jewel case when $5 gets you the game retail, for life, on Steam - and the devs made $5 off the Steam copy, but $0 off the used copy. Literally everyone wins.

Except Gamestop. They lose.

Because it's digital, it actually doesn't matter at all in the big picture if each individual game is cheap so long as the customer spends the same amount they would have otherwise. If you have a backlog, they did what they set out to do - you spend the same as you ever did, but now you feel like a king with a huge game library, while it has cost them exactly nothing to give you all the games instead of one or two games.

Really, it's worth admiring - new media enables economics to shift in a mutually beneficial direction.
#44DarkZV2BetaPosted 4/30/2014 8:30:53 AM
Lvthn posted...
Steam sales are the smart answer to used games. Why pay $10 for a sketchy looking disk in a junked jewel case when $5 gets you the game retail, for life, on Steam - and the devs made $5 off the Steam copy, but $0 off the used copy. Literally everyone wins.

Except Gamestop. They lose.

Because it's digital, it actually doesn't matter at all in the big picture if each individual game is cheap so long as the customer spends the same amount they would have otherwise. If you have a backlog, they did what they set out to do - you spend the same as you ever did, but now you feel like a king with a huge game library, while it has cost them exactly nothing to give you all the games instead of one or two games.

Really, it's worth admiring - new media enables economics to shift in a mutually beneficial direction.


That actually primarily benefits smaller companies, as larger companies could see a larger per-unit profit by keeping prices high, and without those sales, smaller companies would have a harder time getting consumers' attention. that's one of the reasons why the console market has become so hostile and anticompetitive. Consumers only have so much to spend, so if a large company that makes mainstream, "safe" games can force you to choose between a game that could be terrible, or a game that's guaranteed to at least be good, consumers will almost always choose the safe purchase.
I'd bet that's one of the reasons EA was campaigning so hard against Steam sales, claiming it "devalues intellectual property" ect ect.

However, on the flipside, smaller companies need to stay competitive. While you could previously get more sales by offering your game at a "budget price"($30-$40), primarily on people with low income, those same people have the option to wait shop around and get a better deal for a better quality product. So, a lot of publishers are having a hard time pushing "budget games" at those prices(usually the kind of crap that parents buy for their kids because they don't know better, or fans buy because of some license) and in many cases, they don't stand to reach a large audience with that kind of product anyway.
---
god invented extension cords. -elchris79
Starcraft 2 has no depth or challenge -GoreGross
#45MeatballsoupPosted 4/30/2014 8:35:00 AM
Game stores only pay the developers when they buy games from them. Then they sell used games, they just get to keep the money

When a steam game is sold the money goes to the developer, duh
#46AsucaHayashiPosted 4/30/2014 8:49:21 AM
DarkZV2Beta posted...
AsucaHayashi posted...
godplaysSNES posted...
It takes a long time for popular games to get big discounts. Take Skyrim for example.


this annoys me... it's a fact they get more per unit sold on PC and yet they treat PC in the same league as console in order to maximize profits usually with a starting price of $60(just because and definitely not out of necessity) with rare discounts that only go up to a certain point.

something i like to call too big and arrogant for their own good.


So stop buying into it.

"How dare a company try to make as much money as possible, as they are legally obligated to do! They should make less money to suit MY interests!"


yes, how dare they actually when there's no grounds for it whatsoever other than to create the illusion of pricing parity between PC and console while "still" treating PC gamers as 2nd rate customers(eg. ubisoft launcching their games later etc.).

also, i don't buy into it(for the most part... bought D3 because my friends wanted to get in on it asap) but there are millions out there that do which just enforces the practice.
---
PC hardware doesn't need to match console hardware in price when PC gamers save literal thousands from the software they buy.
http://i.imgur.com/9Yv0R2Z.jpg
#47DawnshadowPosted 4/30/2014 9:00:11 AM
The difference is that Steam sales are voluntary on the publisher's part and can make them a ton of profit-- they're not losing money with a Steam sale. With a few rare exceptions, game sales peak not long after a game is released, then trail off into the "long tail" of people occasionally hearing about your older game and buying it. In physical retail, eventually that tail dies down enough that it's no longer worth letting that game take up a little of the store's valuable shelf space, and the game goes out of print (and is only available through the used game market at that point.)

But a game has a set cost to create, and a digital sale has no cost for packaging or storage beyond a few pennies of hard drive space and bandwidth-- through a digital storefront, a game can be left up for sale for years, or even decades-- look at GOG.com, which originally specialized in getting older games back on the market legally in digital form (until they ran out of older games to ask about and branched out a little so they could keep adding new content.)

A steam sale or including your game in an indie bundle can generate a new spike of interest from people who wouldn't pay full price for the game, earning the developer more money and getting more interest in future games the developer may release. I got Torchlight on the cheap, liked it, and preordered Torchlight 2.

Majoras_pants posted...
Used games give NO money to publishers. It's as bad as pirating.


A used car gives NO money to a car manufacturer. Is buying a used car as bad as stealing a car? Should yard sales and secondhand stores be made illegal? (Admittedly, I don't think piracy is as bad as people make it out to be, but....)
---
*Turn Evil can now be cast on players. When used, it applies a small goatee and causes them to explain their diabolical plans while steepling their fingers.
#48popping4itPosted 4/30/2014 9:01:00 AM
1 > 0
...
small amount of profit > none gamestop used games
---
whens mahvel?
#49arleasPosted 4/30/2014 9:01:02 AM
I think a lot of people HAVE stopped buying into it which is what prompts all these topics making steam users out to be cheapasses because they wait for a sale. How dare I try to save my money and get the most out of it as I can!

It goes both ways. If I had to spend $60 on every game then I'd probably have 1/10th the game library I have now, and all that money would go to one or two developers. That's gotta be good for the industry huh?
---
http://raptr.com/badge/arleas/uc.png
http://www.speedtest.net/result/3201564081.png
#50xpiritflarePosted 4/30/2014 9:11:15 AM
The cranky hermit posted...
Used Game: Developer gets not a penny, Gamestop makes 100%
Steam Sale game: 70% of the money. ie. $10 game = $7 in the pocket. Steam gets $3

This is a thing everyone forgets about used games. Before a used game is even available, the copy MUST have sold new in the first place! So in actuality, the developer got a big percentage of the used copy's full price - they simply got it before it was re-sold. This payment, which enabled two people to play the game, would be far more than the $14 they'd get from selling two copies to Steam users.

It's not that cut and dry. You have to factor in the amount of people that WOULD buy the game at $10 that wouldn't have when it was full price, whether it's people looking for a discount or if they're not quite sure or whatever reason. The scenario could very well be a $60 game bought once new and bought used, versus 20 people buying it at $10 because it was cheap enough to take the plunge. I know that I wouldn't have bought and even given a chance/look to around half of the games in my Steam library if they weren't on sale. Put me in the "it's cheap enough, why not?" crowd.
---
Yeah. "I'm going to turn back time an hour. It'll take about an hour." - AnnaBananaa