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Cable industry strikes again

#1blueheart100Posted 5/12/2014 2:54:46 PM
Apparently, they are releasing false information on why the Internet shouldn't be reclassified as a communications carrier.
http://www.freepress.net/blog/2014/05/12/tell-congress-donít-sign-cable-industry-letter-against-real-net-neutrality
One thing is for sure. We are defiantly getting them on the offense.
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I fight to protect our internet one game board at a time. Who shall join me?
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#2blueheart100(Topic Creator)Posted 5/12/2014 2:56:33 PM
This is why I'm glad google is also getting into the internet provider business. Cable internet needs to die.
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I fight to protect our internet one game board at a time. Who shall join me?
http://www.fightforthefuture.org www.fairtax.com
#3KillerTrufflePosted 5/12/2014 3:51:21 PM
"In the years that broadband service has been subjected to relatively little regulation, investment and deployment have flourished and broadband competition has increased, all to the benefit of consumers and the American economy."


Hmm... I hadn't realized that the US continuing to fall farther and farther behind other modernized countries in terms of internet speed (we're slower) and cost (we're more expensive) was "to the benefit of consumers." Cable companies sure have some crappy dictionaries if that's the sort of thing they define as benefit.
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"How do I get rid of a Trojan Horse?" -Sailor_Kakashi
"Leave it outside the gates of Troy overnight." -Davel23
#4ein311Posted 5/12/2014 3:57:36 PM
Broadband competition sure has increased! In my area I can choose between AT&T's depressing DSL service that tops out at an amazing 6mbps on a good day, or I can have Comcast residential... or Comcast business.

Boy howdy, that competition sure has changed from 10 years ago when my choices for broadband internet were limited to just AT&T's depressing DSL service that topped out at an amazing 3mbps on a good day, or Comcast residential!
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#5KillerTrufflePosted 5/12/2014 3:57:38 PM
My own letter to all of my state representatives to congress:

A letter from the cable company lobby has surfaced, which opposes classification of Internet Service Providers as Title II common carriers. In part, this letter states that "In the years that broadband service has been subjected to relatively little regulation, investment and deployment have flourished and broadband competition has increased, all to the benefit of consumers and the American economy."

What this letter fails to address is the fact that over the years, the United States has continued to fall farther and farther behind other developed countries in terms of both internet speeds and cost of service. If you look at virtually any modernized country in the world, you'll find that the United States again and again has the slowest average broadband speed for the highest cost to consumers - often 2 to 3 times slower than other countries, but at 4 times the cost. Evidence of this has been published as recently as this past December, 2013, in the New York Times.

I would not say we've made no progress, but the statement the cable lobby presents is misleading. The United States is sorely behind other countries in terms of internet service. Allowing internet providers to selectively classify traffic and artificially control the speed of various types - or sources - of traffic allows them the power to force out competitors. While the proposed bill says that no traffic will be *blocked*, providers would be given the allowance to legally slow down competitors' traffic so greatly as to make it unusable.

One example is Netflix - streaming video absolutely requires a minimum speed to stream high quality. The proposed bill allows providers to throttle traffic back to slower than necessary for streaming, making it impossible to reasonably utilize services like Netflix, and thereby pushing more people to use the competing on-demand cable television instead. Internet providers would be able to charge any amount they want to these content providers, and if they don't pay, they could make their content unusable. This will also provide yet another tool to internet giants in anti-competitive practices, which help them to maintain exorbitant rates while providing minimal service. The cable lobby letter also is misleading that competition has increased - in fact, it has *decreased*, particularly with Comcast moving now to acquire Time Warner.

Allowing internet providers to selectively control the speed of all traffic they provide will be a tremendous step backward for the already lagging internet service in the U.S. I would ask that you look into the facts for yourself, and please vote to classify internet providers as a common carrier. In this day and age, the internet is effectively mandatory for the majority of people to do work as well as receive news and entertainment. As such, internet providers should indeed be classified and regulated under similar terms as telecommunications and other common carriers.

Please do not give internet providers more authority to define what they feel the internet should be, and stifle competition. Keep the internet open.


Probably too long for them to read, but I figured it'd be better than "Plz to keep internets open."
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"How do I get rid of a Trojan Horse?" -Sailor_Kakashi
"Leave it outside the gates of Troy overnight." -Davel23
#6Orestes417Posted 5/12/2014 3:58:52 PM
Start holding politicians personally accountable for the changes they make at all times. Not when it matters, but on every day that ends with a Y between now and the end of their natural lives both in the public and private sector until such a time as their eventual replacements take the hint that they're not getting away from their actions. Only then will you have people acting in the best interests of their constituents over money.
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Bled dry from the inside, darkest of weather
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#7DoomkillaPosted 5/12/2014 4:00:38 PM
There's a reason why it's called congress and not progress.
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"The Wheel weaves as the Wheel wills, and we are only the thread of the Pattern."
Moiraine Damodred
#8daemon_danPosted 5/12/2014 4:09:29 PM
KillerTruffle posted...
"In the years that broadband service has been subjected to relatively little regulation, investment and deployment have flourished and broadband competition has increased, all to the benefit of consumers and the American economy."


Hmm... I hadn't realized that the US continuing to fall farther and farther behind other modernized countries in terms of internet speed (we're slower) and cost (we're more expensive) was "to the benefit of consumers." Cable companies sure have some crappy dictionaries if that's the sort of thing they define as benefit.


I just wanna throw this out here as to why we're falling behind other countries.
The countries that have cheap, stupid fast internet are generally smaller than the size of my thumb on a standard size map. You can drive from one end of the country to the other in less than 12 hours. How hard is it to wire that entire area with fiber? How much of a monetary hit is that to their economy? Take The US. It's one country, and overlaying our infrastructure with fiber, currently, falls on the federal government. It's all a crapshoot at the moment
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"Desperate times call for desperate measures. Go ahead and pour that gasoline."
~DevilDriver: Desperate Times
#9SneakiestNegPosted 5/12/2014 4:16:39 PM
Funny fact: most of America does not matter. Even your metropolitan areas are lacking. Like the tri-state area that actually contributes to US GDP. No one expects Arkansas to get fiber immediately.
#10daemon_danPosted 5/12/2014 4:20:01 PM
SneakiestNeg posted...
Funny fact: most of America does not matter. Even your metropolitan areas are lacking. Like the tri-state area that actually contributes to US GDP. No one expects Arkansas to get fiber immediately.


You obviously don't understand how the internet works
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"Desperate times call for desperate measures. Go ahead and pour that gasoline."
~DevilDriver: Desperate Times