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Is it possible to split an ethernet connection at the receiving end?

#11LordSeiferPosted 6/9/2014 5:42:42 AM
you would just use a router instead of a switch for wireless.

also, permanently used wall socket >>> cable running through 4 doors
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^ this
#12AsucaHayashi(Topic Creator)Posted 6/9/2014 6:48:16 AM(edited)
you would just use a router instead of a switch for wireless.

are you suggesting i run another router through a connection that already is connected to a router? pretty sure that isn't possible(already mentioned the connection is wireless but again too much of a distance and walls to maintain a stable signal). oh and 50ft was an understatement since it's apparently 15m but it's closer to 20m~.

also, just so i'm being clear i have no intention of going into their apartment or bothering them about this again except if the connection suddenly dies on me.

everything about their setup except for the cable is not mine and i'm just paying a small part to get in on it and i'm more than satisfied with the arrangement.
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#13ChetyrePosted 6/9/2014 6:54:42 AM
AsucaHayashi posted...
you would just use a router instead of a switch for wireless.

are you suggesting i run another router through a connection that already is connected to a router? pretty sure that isn't possible(already mentioned the connection is wireless but again too much of a distance and walls to maintain a stable signal). oh and 50ft was an understatement since it's apparently 15m but it's closer to 20m~.

also, just so i'm being clear i have no intention of going into their apartment or bothering them about this again except if the connection suddenly dies on me.

everything about their setup except for the cable is not mine and i'm just paying a small part to get in on it and i'm more than satisfied with the arrangement.


Who told you you can't connect a router to a router? In any case, you aren't going to use it as a router, you will configure it as a switch + Access Point. You see, what we generally refer to as a "router" for home use is actually a router, a switch and an AP all in one.
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#14AsucaHayashi(Topic Creator)Posted 6/9/2014 7:02:28 AM
i stand corrected then. multiple connections isn't something i've done much of.

so instead of a switch i'll just connect another router at the same spot and it would give me all i've asked for?
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PC hardware doesn't need to match console hardware in price when PC gamers save literal thousands from the software they buy.
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#15ChetyrePosted 6/9/2014 7:31:01 AM
after proper configuration (not difficult), yes.
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#16LordSeiferPosted 6/10/2014 7:51:34 PM
connecting routers to routers is basically how the internet works.

and yes you would likely configure it as an access point, but even if you used it as a router it would still work as long as its not on the same ip address as your neighbours
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^ this
#17SinisterSlayPosted 6/10/2014 8:32:51 PM
LordSeifer posted...
connecting routers to routers is basically how the internet works.

and yes you would likely configure it as an access point, but even if you used it as a router it would still work as long as its not on the same ip address as your neighbours


I imagine upnp doesn't work so well if you go router to router, having two NAT layers.
Power line adapters would be the best choice I think. You could always put it on a power bar if you really needed that socket.
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#18Sir_Burpalot21Posted 6/11/2014 2:20:34 AM(edited)
Powerline adapters should only be placed directly into an outlet for the best performance. There are some powerline adapters that come with a socket so it doesn't take one up from you.

As for your situation (if I'm understanding this correctly) you have 2 other options.
1. Run a long Cat5 to connect the Primary Router (Your network's gateway to the internet) to a switch (or another router acting as a switch). From that switch you can connect your computer and whatever else you like.

2. Convert the second router into a wireless bridge. This will connect wirelessly to the Primary Router. From that second router you can connect your devices by ethernet. IIRC you can also turn it into a repeater bridge to extend the wireless signal. However, if the wireless signal from the Primary router is too weak this will not work very well.

Since most stock routers wont give you this functionality you'll want to flash something like DD-WRT onto it.
I use it myself since my PC doesn't have a wireless card and my section of the house doesn't have an ethernet port.
Primary router -> Powerline adapter -> Second router (used as a switch + wireless access point) -> [Computer (wired) + Xbox (wired) + phone (wireless) + tablet (wireless)]

DD-WRT is popularly used to convert routers into wireless bridges and repeaters. The documentation isn't exactly straightforward due to so many different builds and models, but it's there.
http://www.dd-wrt.com/wiki/index.php/Installation
http://www.dd-wrt.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=51486
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