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plugging ethernet into surge protector?

#1adramelk44Posted 6/9/2014 11:01:15 AM
Does anyone actually do this? I have a surge protector in my computer room that has ethernet CAT5 slots but just wondering if surge protecting the ethernet cord is even necessary... is my computer at risk if I don't? (BTW I do not have my modem/router plugged into the surge protector, they are plugged straight into the wall in a different room)
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#2SinisterSlayPosted 6/9/2014 11:18:25 AM
Not sure, haven't really had to worry about surges like that since the dialup days when the internal modems would occasionally arc electricity to the CPU.
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#3Orestes417Posted 6/9/2014 11:20:42 AM
It's a minor bit of extra protection, so yeah might as well use it. Best case it keeps your mobo from getting fried in an indirect lightning strike or other large surge. Worst case it does nothing and you've lost nothing.
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#4Davel23Posted 6/9/2014 11:37:04 AM
Are you sure they're RJ-45 ports? RJ-11 ports for phone lines are pretty common on surge protectors, but I don't think I've ever seen RJ-45 on one.
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#5adramelk44(Topic Creator)Posted 6/9/2014 11:49:06 AM
Davel23 posted...
Are you sure they're RJ-45 ports? RJ-11 ports for phone lines are pretty common on surge protectors, but I don't think I've ever seen RJ-45 on one.


Yeah it has both. It's this one:
http://www.walmart.com/ip/APC-11-Outlet-2375J-Surge/12321690
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#6PhilOnDezPosted 6/9/2014 12:02:27 PM
The only thing I've ever had damaged by a power surge/lightning strike was the NIC on an old pentium 4 Gateway prebuilt. If it's not any extra work I would personally do it but I wouldn't spend money on it or really go out of my way to do it.
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#7westom1Posted 6/10/2014 6:16:21 AM
Protectors that actually claim protection from destructive surges always have a dedicated wire for the low impedance (ie 'less than 10 foot') connection to earth. That protector does not have it. It only claims to protect from a type of surge already made irrelevant by protection inside NICs.

Ethernet protection is typically good for up to 2000 volts. Your concern is a rare and destructive surge that may overwhelm that existing protection. That surge protector is a completely different device that, unfortunately, has a same name.

An example of an ethernet protector is:
http://www.ditekcorp.com/product-details.asp?ProdKey=59
Notice an earth ground connection necessary to have protection. The installation guide also recommends it must be a single point earth ground. As required by any other effective protector.
#8adramelk44(Topic Creator)Posted 6/10/2014 7:21:44 PM
westom1 posted...
Protectors that actually claim protection from destructive surges always have a dedicated wire for the low impedance (ie 'less than 10 foot') connection to earth. That protector does not have it. It only claims to protect from a type of surge already made irrelevant by protection inside NICs.

Ethernet protection is typically good for up to 2000 volts. Your concern is a rare and destructive surge that may overwhelm that existing protection. That surge protector is a completely different device that, unfortunately, has a same name.

An example of an ethernet protector is:
http://www.ditekcorp.com/product-details.asp?ProdKey=59
Notice an earth ground connection necessary to have protection. The installation guide also recommends it must be a single point earth ground. As required by any other effective protector.


Crap, yea I kind of figured I was wasting my money... I could've gotten the cheaper model w/o the ports. Oh well, thanks for the info!
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#9LordSeiferPosted 6/10/2014 7:30:13 PM
27 bucks wont break the bank.
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#10MarikhenPosted 6/10/2014 7:37:52 PM
Honestly, I'd sooner plug the modem and router into a surge protector and then run the coax through said protector before plugging it into the modem than I would run network signals through a surge protector. I'll grant that planning for "inside" surges isn't necessarily a bad idea, but it's my preference to come as close to eliminating the possibility of them before planning on them occurring.
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