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I give up. I simply cannot learn programming.

#11PolarisPosted 6/20/2014 12:18:06 AM
If learning were easy then everybody would be educated
#12Majoras_pantsPosted 6/20/2014 12:25:19 AM
I started with Javascript and PHP at the same time. I pretty much blitzed into web development. In 6 months I learned HTML, CSS, Javascript, jQuery and a bit of PHP. I also learned how to interact with MySQL and design/use databases. It was a lot to learn quickly, but I was able to dive into freelance web development, and within a year it was a viable career for me. Now a little over a year later and I have a solid income from it, and am starting to learn Python so I can branch in to software design, and maybe some game design (I've made some javascript games but it's not easy to take a javascript game too far).

I really suggest starting with Javascript. It's very different than most languages but it's pretty great for beginners since you can do a lot with the language from the start. DOM manipulation is something you'll be able to do in a couple of weeks, and basic programming techniques are all there. Plus, it's one of the more useful languages for junior freelance jobs. I bought a few books, and the best was "Speaking Javascript". Do Code Academy, as well. Not the best method but it helps.
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#13malufet18Posted 6/20/2014 2:23:21 AM
Skul_ posted...
malufet18 posted...
Start learning the simple language such as HTML then expand from there. There are a lot language and once you start to learn and master one the rest should be a bit easy to learn.


HTML isnt programming though.

Also, TC, if you get confused when learning, just keep going. As you go through everything will start making sense. Some people get programming easily, some people have a harder time, and some people just cant get their head around it at all.

Edit: Buy me steam games and ill teach you too Java. pls pls


That's why I said learn basic language such as HTML. It's basically just making him start somewhere easy to get a start with before moving on.
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#14kingoffpsPosted 6/20/2014 2:46:43 AM(edited)
Ok well I haven't read the whole topic as I'm in a rush. But having read your first post, I suggest that you stay away from any object-oriented stuff like classes, instancing, inheritance etc.

Stick to a VERY simple imperative language like C (NOT to be confused with C++) until you master actual programming. Many courses (at my university included) throw people into object-oriented stuff like Java and give it just as much priority as simple imperative logic like while loops and assertions. This is a mistake.

If you can master C, (which is much closer to how a computer actually works than say Java) then you will be able to build on top of it.
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#15KamenRiderBladePosted 6/20/2014 2:52:38 AM
For me, Pascal was my first language that I learned.

But C++ was the first language that I truly understood and put most of my efforts in

Looking at C after learning C++ was kind of a weird step into a parallel universe.

C# was nice in terms of syntax structure, but the lack of pointers made me feel weird.

I wasn't a fan of giving up control of memory allocation and letting the garbage collector manage my memory.


Anyways. Learning a language is hard, but once you get the fundamental logic down, everything else will seem easy.

The reason I recommend C++ is that it has every core programming construct you would need to know to adapt it to any other language.

It's a relatively high staircase to climb, but the knowledge you gain from it is well worth it.
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#16aaronj904Posted 6/20/2014 3:16:21 AM
I learned a bit of programming with Python in my free time. Python was great to start on for me!
#17GunmaN1905Posted 6/20/2014 3:22:13 AM
My first language was C. I started with it from "The C programming Language" written by Kernighan and Ritchie, creators of the language itself.
Really great book, I think that anyone who gets lost in it should reconsider if they should even bother with programming.
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#18RiaanYsterPosted 6/20/2014 3:23:12 AM
kingoffps posted...
Ok well I haven't read the whole topic as I'm in a rush. But having read your first post, I suggest that you stay away from any object-oriented stuff like classes, instancing, inheritance etc.

Stick to a VERY simple imperative language like C (NOT to be confused with C++) until you master actual programming. Many courses (at my university included) throw people into object-oriented stuff like Java and give it just as much priority as simple imperative logic like while loops and assertions. This is a mistake.

If you can master C, (which is much closer to how a computer actually works than say Java) then you will be able to build on top of it.


This man speaks sense.

Although C is harder in many ways (with how low level it is compared to Java) it does give you a great idea of what coding actually is, underneath the bonnet.

I'd like to ad something from my own experience: I learnt coding at university having never studied it in school while the course assumed you have a basic knowledge, so it was very intimidating and confusing at first. But I had to push through and eventually it started making sense.

It really is tough at first, you realize coding is a language and since it is a mathematical language it feels like, not only learning a new language, but one that works entirely different to the ones you have learnt before. But by keeping at it, having people to help you (you could join a forum or something where you would get this) is important and helps a lot. I don't know if I would have managed if it werent' for my room mate at the time.

Lastly, i will add that i pretty much hated it during university but once i started working as a programmer i started to love it. It becomes more practical and less theoretical as well as you never really create stuff from scratch but edit/maintain/fix existing code.

It's a great job to do since there are always new challenges and things to figure out, it becomes almost a puzzle solving exercise every day. But it does change quite a lot going from studies to work and in a good way.

Good Luck and stick with it, you won't be sorry once you 'get' it.
#19Orestes417Posted 6/20/2014 3:27:54 AM
The hard part of learning programming isn't the language it's the logical thought process. Once you have that the language doesn't much matter besides picking up the vocabulary. Start working with flowcharts and books on programming logic. Diagram other people's code, particularly the standard libraries for your language of choice. Follow the logic till you understand it.
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#20PraetorXynPosted 6/20/2014 3:28:20 AM
If you think methods and Classes are obtuse concepts programming isn't foe you.
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