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Don't know where to start learning how to Program

#1ViolentAbacusPosted 7/4/2014 4:59:46 PM
Which language to learn? - Results (142 votes)
C++
50.7% (72 votes)
72
C#
19.01% (27 votes)
27
JavaScript
15.49% (22 votes)
22
Other (Explain)
14.79% (21 votes)
21
This poll is now closed.
Okay, so I'm going to college to get an Associates Degree in IT and a Bachelor's Degree in Computer Science and decided that before I go to college I want to learn how to code a bit, just to see how I like it (for Computer Science and the programming IT track), and to start playing around with code as a hobby, trying to create games and software that probably won't do anything spectacular.

Anyway, I'm having trouble getting to start, since I know next to nothing about the diffferent Programming Languages besides the names, so I was wondering where the best place to start would be, and why. I understand this is really opinionated and really based on what I want to learn, but I'd still like the hear other peoples opinions.

Also, what're some good books and/or places to learn how to program/code?

Thanks in advance!

*I'm going to post this on the Web Design and Programming + Game programming board too*
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#2Pal 080Posted 7/4/2014 5:03:33 PM(edited)
I'd suggest leaving programming to other people as it seems entirely tedious, boring and unrewarding... though that's just my opinion!

I'd say the same about University in general :p

Based on previous topics like this though... expect a LOT of different answers and suggestions on where to start!
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"If we can hit that bulls-eye, the rest of the dominoes will fall like a house of cards. Checkmate"
#3alsroboshackPosted 7/4/2014 5:03:52 PM
I tried C# and I couldn't get into it. I have heard you can do good things with it, but its quite the pain.
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some people treat life as a game,
some people treat games as life.
#4ViolentAbacus(Topic Creator)Posted 7/4/2014 5:07:30 PM
Pal 080 posted...
I'd suggest leaving programming to other people as it seems entirely tedious, boring and unrewarding... though that's just my opinion!

I'd say the same about University in general :p

Based on previous topics like this though... expect a LOT of different answers and suggestions on where to start!


Heh, good thing I like tedious and boring work. Usually less surprises, but who knows. It's always something I've been interested in though, and if I hate it now I'll at least have enough time to change the track to Network Security or something.

And that's what I want, to see everyone's different opinions and see why they suggest that, and then form my own opinion based on that.
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While you bask in my glory, please try not to make me angry by writing words that don't exist in dictionaries.
#5Pal 080Posted 7/4/2014 5:15:39 PM(edited)
Try a forum search if you don't get much response here now (it IS 4th of July after all, all dem Americans are out on the town), there may still be some topics buried a few pages back about programming. I see this question come up fairly often here.
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"If we can hit that bulls-eye, the rest of the dominoes will fall like a house of cards. Checkmate"
#6HaMMeRHeaD25Posted 7/4/2014 5:24:15 PM
I'm a web app developing intern for my province's health services IT. I started off in University learning basic programming in Java for simple applications and games like solitaire etc for academic purposes. I moved into web application development using PHP, ASP.NET, and now MVC frameworks with C# and Razor. Nearly all of the skills transferred over, and I do a lot of practical database work as well which the programming prepared me for.

I would suggest starting off with Java because it's quite simple, but even C# would do because it's reasonably similar. Understand that you'll have to learn a lot of concepts and principles on good programming technique and it's a long but rewarding road if you want to be a skilled programmer.
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Ya ave a license fa dem dubs?
#7ViolentAbacus(Topic Creator)Posted 7/4/2014 6:14:53 PM
I'm going to try that depending on how many opinions/if I make up my mind, but hopefully I won't have too.

Yeah, I knew that Java (Or at least Java Script) was similar to C#, because I was once debating on whether learning how to Program using Unity or not, and they were both an option.

Thanks for the advice!
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While you bask in my glory, please try not to make me angry by writing words that don't exist in dictionaries.
#8Bazooka_PenguinPosted 7/4/2014 6:16:21 PM
http://math.hws.edu/javanotes/index.html
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#9ClashtonnPosted 7/4/2014 6:18:12 PM
I started with PHP and moved to Javascript. Javascript was much easier to learn for me, but that's just because I like it better.

Now I'm learning a bit of Python, but that's just for fun. I'm a web developer so PHP and Javascript were essential.

I would suggest not learning Javascript first though. It's a weird language to start with. You should either start with Python for flexibility and because it's an easier language, or C++ for it's power, though it's very complex.
#10InferiorPeasantPosted 7/4/2014 6:21:24 PM
If you're going to college and majoring in CS shouldn't it all be planned for you? Talk to your consular... I wouldn't recommend trying to learn yourself until you start taking classes.

Pal 080 posted...
I'd suggest leaving programming to other people as it seems entirely tedious, boring and unrewarding... though that's just my opinion!


Which is why you'll never get anywhere in life. Although, that is just my opinion. We're always going to need people to tell computers how to think (aka program).

It's really fun creating things.