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Don't know where to start learning how to Program

#31NoncasusPosted 7/5/2014 9:45:14 AM
InferiorPeasant posted...
Noncasus posted...
If you want to start with a language I'd suggest C++. Once you got that down go with Javascript then Python.

Here's a book I heard is pretty good:
http://javascriptbook.com/


I just don't understand why someone would recommend starting (with no previous programming experience) at C++ then Python?


That's why I said language. If someone really wants to get into programming they should learn pseudocode (as previously mentioned by TI_Four), and algorithms.

I should have clarified that, I guess.

If however I misunderstood and you are saying Python is easier than C++, well to each their own. I didn't see one being easier than the other.
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#32PraetorXynPosted 7/5/2014 11:39:27 AM
I started with C++ and had no trouble. You will be using C++ almost exclusively if you go to graduate school.

C# iis what I use currently and love it. You can make an excellent living doing SharePoint development. Roughly $75/hr after you have abiut 8-10 years of experience.
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#33majinbuu58Posted 7/5/2014 11:43:26 AM
I suggest starting with java or c++
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#34ElementalWindPosted 7/5/2014 12:26:30 PM
You will be using C++ almost exclusively if you go to graduate school.
I have not had reason to touch C++ since my second year of undergrad.
How much time have you actually been in grad school?

Pseudocode. Seriously... Learning a programming language is pointless if you have no prior knowledge or experience with programming logic and design. You will just get lost and confused or you will learn bad programming habits or you will only be able to create buggy programs filled with flaws.
Writing only pseudocode is a good way to create buggy programs filled with flaws and still think you've done it right.
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#35Orestes417Posted 7/5/2014 12:42:04 PM
ElementalWind posted...

Pseudocode. Seriously... Learning a programming language is pointless if you have no prior knowledge or experience with programming logic and design. You will just get lost and confused or you will learn bad programming habits or you will only be able to create buggy programs filled with flaws.
Writing only pseudocode is a good way to create buggy programs filled with flaws and still think you've done it right.


So's coding in most any language without learning the sub basics first. The fact something compiles does not exempt it from being ****. Start with the logic, study the logic, then apply what you've learned to writing code reinforced by near constant work on the logic. For the most part the language picked is irrelevant as long as you're not changing paradigm.

Personally I'd stay away from languages like C and C++ that require low level memory management till after one has the foundation to properly understand it. Too easy to pick up bad habits, especially if you're self taught. Python's a decent choice transitioning from pseudocode and Java or C# are both decent starts for learning OOP.

All that said, I do feel the need to reemphasize that newbies REALLY need to learn the formal logic of things and how to plan a project before jumping in and starting hacking. Things like formal specifications and problem analysis are super important skills that too many people gloss over. Testing methodology matters too. Better to start learning that early as well.
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#36codyorrPosted 7/5/2014 2:14:47 PM
High School is where I started but then again MACs aren't really PCs.
#37ElementalWindPosted 7/5/2014 2:20:02 PM
So's coding in most any language without learning the sub basics first. The fact something compiles does not exempt it from being ****. Start with the logic, study the logic, then apply what you've learned to writing code reinforced by near constant work on the logic. For the most part the language picked is irrelevant as long as you're not changing paradigm.
Sure, but learning what language constructs do need not be done in the absence of a language.
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#38Orestes417Posted 7/5/2014 2:28:51 PM
No, but it does need to be done before you start coding much more complicated things than printf lines.
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Some roads you shouldn't go down because maps used to say there'd be dragons there. Now they don't, but that don't mean the dragons aren't there.
#39CatalystGuitar18Posted 7/6/2014 6:16:40 AM(edited)
I would learn Standard ML, Racket, and Ruby first (in that order), then JavaScript and Rails if you want to be a web developer, or JavaScript and Python, or JavaScript and PHP, or all of the above. I have no advice on how to become a software developer, so I'm not going to comment on that.

As for how to learn, use Stanford and MIT Open Education to take classes, as well as Coursera. It's free and is miles ahead of Codeacademy, Treehouse, etc
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#40ViolentAbacus(Topic Creator)Posted 7/6/2014 7:51:53 AM
Okay, this may sound like a stupid question, but what's Pseudocode and what's the benefits?
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