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Don't know where to start learning how to Program

#41Orestes417Posted 7/6/2014 8:08:59 AM(edited)
Pseudocode is basically a tool to put the logic of a program on paper using human language instead of programming language. It's format varies considerably depending on who's doing it but the important part is in the planning and layout.

One of the reasons python is so popular is it very much resembles pseudocode in it's readability and syntax.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pseudocode
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#42ViolentAbacus(Topic Creator)Posted 7/6/2014 8:37:43 AM
Oh, interesting.. Are there any decent books that I can get for Pseudocode and/or learning algorithms then?
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#43PraetorXynPosted 7/6/2014 10:34:17 AM
ElementalWind posted...
You will be using C++ almost exclusively if you go to graduate school.
I have not had reason to touch C++ since my second year of undergrad.
How much time have you actually been in grad school?

Pseudocode. Seriously... Learning a programming language is pointless if you have no prior knowledge or experience with programming logic and design. You will just get lost and confused or you will learn bad programming habits or you will only be able to create buggy programs filled with flaws.
Writing only pseudocode is a good way to create buggy programs filled with flaws and still think you've done it right.


I finished graduate school in 2010. For every course I took that required programming, e.g. Distributed Systems, Software Design, OpenGL, etc. we used C++ on Linux. The only exception was Software Verification and Validation, where we used Java because JUnit is a fantastic framework for creating unit tests. It was ported to NUnit for C#, so I wish we would have used that instead but I digress.
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#44PraetorXynPosted 7/6/2014 10:37:42 AM
ViolentAbacus posted...
Oh, interesting.. Are there any decent books that I can get for Pseudocode and/or learning algorithms then?


Pretty much any Algorithms textbook you use will have all the algorithms in psuedo-code.

The standard algorithms textbook is this one, which I used in grad school.
http://amzn.com/0262033844
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Console war in a nutshell:
http://imgur.com/xA6GJZ9.png
#45ViolentAbacus(Topic Creator)Posted 7/6/2014 2:40:04 PM
Phew that is expensive! Though the reviews are good for the most part.
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#46SinisterSlayPosted 7/6/2014 2:47:06 PM
Stop recommending javascript.
A beginner absolutely must start with a strongly typed language. Javascript is horrible to start with. You can start using variables just by using them, never explicitly declaring them. A small typo in a variable name can screw up all your code and have you searching for hours trying to find it because you accidentally upper cased a letter once.
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He who stumbles around in darkness with a stick is blind. But he who... sticks out in darkness... is... fluorescent! - Brother Silence
#47Orestes417Posted 7/6/2014 2:48:14 PM
Yeah, that's one of the things about an IT career you don't necessarily realize at first. You'll accumulate a bookshelf or three over the years. I've found the O'Reilly Safari subscription service to be an amazing resource. Granted it's probably a little early to jump on that train.

More realistically check your local library. Most even have digital services now.
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Some roads you shouldn't go down because maps used to say there'd be dragons there. Now they don't, but that don't mean the dragons aren't there.
#48SgtInfinityPosted 7/6/2014 3:07:05 PM
I think before you ask what language to code you should ask where and what you want to code.
The industry you want to work in may use certain coding that you'd want to specialize in.
#49ElementalWindPosted 7/6/2014 6:48:21 PM(edited)
I finished graduate school in 2010.
And you were never exposed to the notion that your area of specialization (wait... did you actually specialize in anything or just take a handful of unrelated classes?) is not the whole of CS?
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#50ADHDguitarPosted 7/6/2014 6:46:28 PM
F*** everything about C++.

Learn it first. It's hard, but if you start with it everything else will be easier.
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