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Don't know where to start learning how to Program

#61SinisterSlayPosted 7/9/2014 6:50:38 AM(edited)
Treason686 posted...
SinisterSlay posted...


For example.
Here is a for loop in javascript
for (var i=0; i<=10; i+=5)
{
//do stuff 3 times
}

And the same code in vba
dim i as integer
for i = 0 to 10 step 5
'do stuff 3 times
next i

You can easily learn the basic control functions, then move on to useful languages.




Maybe I've seen too many for loops, but I can't for the life of me figure out how that Javascript code is somehow harder to interpret. It's almost like you're intentionally making it confusing by incrementing i by 5.


Yeah once you understand it, they both look easy. But you have to look at it as someone who has never seen code before.
Just like how COBOL was originally designed with sentences and paragraphs.

And yeah, the increment of 5 was purposely done for confusion.
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#62gamefaqwatcherPosted 7/9/2014 6:50:25 AM
I went:
-few tutorials of general C++ (fundamentals)
-Got bored and gave up for a few months.
-Picked up java (not js)and followed a series of tutorials (which was incomplete) on how to make a 2d game. It held my interest since it was about something i enjoy (games).
-Stopped for a few weeks.
-Recently picked up C++ again and following some tutorials.

Currently find learning C++ much more enjoyable than before since i feel as if i've done it before. I think all languages have some similarity. It's just the words and symbols which are different. Haven't done anything much with C++ but the layout feels the same. Parentheses seem to be used the same way.

There's a lot of boring stuff to learn. You should go over it and test yourself to help you remember. Don't cram everything into your head and don't go too fast. It's not a race nor is it a course when you're self learning without a time limit. Take it easy and you will enjoy it. Also, don't consider compiler errors to be mistakes. If you can fix it or use google for the solution then you learned from the error :)

I'm just a beginner but it's far more entertaining than playing some games right now. I have a backlog but lack the interest in playing it.
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#63ViolentAbacus(Topic Creator)Posted 7/9/2014 8:44:25 AM
Treason686 posted...


If you don't mind me asking, what University? I'd like to look at their degree plan.


Well, the CC I'm going to for IT is Elizabethtown Community & Technical College. Planning on going to Eastern Kentucky University or Western Kentucky University for my Bachelor's in CS. I'd prefer EKU. I also have Murray University as an option, but I'm only going to go there if I can't get my Bachelor's in CS in three years (Murray has a finish in 5 program)
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#64Treason686Posted 7/9/2014 10:42:27 AM
Just looking at EKU and WKU, I think EKU has a much better course offering. I'm going into my senior year now, and more options is always better. WKU's program looks very restrictive, without much room to choose the courses you want. EKU's program is very similar to my Uni, and I've been happy with the variety of courses offered.

Anyway, looks like the EKU beginning course is CSC190. Some online research (Old assignments) shows that they may use Java, which isn't surprising.

You can obviously pick whatever you want, but it wouldn't be a bad idea to try to get your hand on programming assignments for the class and try to do them yourself. They're obviously very simple since it's designed for complete beginners.
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#65Treason686Posted 7/9/2014 10:42:27 AM
Just looking at EKU and WKU, I think EKU has a much better course offering. I'm going into my senior year now, and more options is always better. WKU's program looks very restrictive, without much room to choose the courses you want. EKU's program is very similar to my Uni, and I've been happy with the variety of courses offered.

Anyway, looks like the EKU beginning course is CSC190. Some online research (Old assignments) shows that they may use Java, which isn't surprising.

You can obviously pick whatever you want, but it wouldn't be a bad idea to try to get your hand on programming assignments for the class and try to do them yourself. They're obviously very simple since it's designed for complete beginners.
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I <3 segfault
#66InferiorPeasantPosted 7/9/2014 12:45:24 PM
TC.

Go to school.
#67unsanePosted 7/12/2014 2:29:12 PM
InferiorPeasant posted...
Go to school.


I'm a high school dropout. Schooling does not equal success in this industry. In many cases, it can be a hindrance, as most development and engineering programs are operating in a cloud of obsolescence. This field is breakneck, and if you truly want to excel, you'll need to match the pace -- a difficult task following a rigid curriculum, learning how to use tech that will effectively be deprecated by the time you earn your degree.

To be fair, I do not condone dropping out of school, that's silly -- I was struggling to live on my own at a very young age and chose self-preservation and paying the bills over my education; I was a product of circumstance -- but I do want to point out the fallacy that education is a requirement of making it in this industry, and that the several years spent acquiring a piece of paper can be better spent learning how things function in the real world, and how your skills work within the context of a normal development environment. Things like using version control (Git) for security and collaborative purposes, learning to (properly) use project management and agile software like JIRA, writing code with the presence of mind that you may be working with a dozen other developers who need to understand your intentions, perhaps without ever asking you directly. All invaluable lessons, and often more important than being a rockstar programmer; almost none of this is touched on in school.
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#68Treason686Posted 7/14/2014 7:24:28 PM
unsane posted...
InferiorPeasant posted...
Go to school.


I'm a high school dropout. Schooling does not equal success in this industry. In many cases, it can be a hindrance, as most development and engineering programs are operating in a cloud of obsolescence. This field is breakneck, and if you truly want to excel, you'll need to match the pace -- a difficult task following a rigid curriculum, learning how to use tech that will effectively be deprecated by the time you earn your degree.

To be fair, I do not condone dropping out of school, that's silly -- I was struggling to live on my own at a very young age and chose self-preservation and paying the bills over my education; I was a product of circumstance -- but I do want to point out the fallacy that education is a requirement of making it in this industry, and that the several years spent acquiring a piece of paper can be better spent learning how things function in the real world, and how your skills work within the context of a normal development environment. Things like using version control (Git) for security and collaborative purposes, learning to (properly) use project management and agile software like JIRA, writing code with the presence of mind that you may be working with a dozen other developers who need to understand your intentions, perhaps without ever asking you directly. All invaluable lessons, and often more important than being a rockstar programmer; almost none of this is touched on in school.


I can see your point, but the simple fact is that the odds of getting your foot in the door are very, very slim without a BS. To call it a fallacy is irresponsible. If you're older you know the industry has changed and a BS is basically a requirement.

All due respect, I think you're very ignorant about modern programs. They don't teach the latest buzzwords in tech. They teach the fundamentals and math concepts. These things simply don't change. There may be electives which cover modern concepts, but a well rounded CS curriculum is heavily math based, and unless they come out with new numbers sometime soon, it will always be relevant.

A high school dropout, in almost every case, is nowhere near the level of a college grad in terms of math and logic abilities.
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I <3 segfault
#69Orestes417Posted 7/14/2014 7:30:53 PM(edited)
Holy hell unsane is still alive. Ye gods. Next thing you know Sheo and Kunaak will uncloak. I do agree that a whole lot of important stuff isn't touched in school and a BS by itself is not what a lot of people think it is. Basically if you go to school you'd best be hitting up internship opportunities or in field jobs before you graduate or you'll find yourself flatfooted in a field of people better prepared.
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#70AcquirePosted 7/14/2014 7:51:02 PM
I'm going to have to go with Treason686 on this one. Unless you are a truly remarkable person, without a BS in some computing related field at this point is going to make it near impossible for you to do anything in the industry. Modern schooling for computer science and software engineering aren't about learning C or learning Java, they're about teaching the fundamental concepts and principles. It's not impossible though, I do know two guys in our company who didn't finish school, though in their case it was because they wanted to start working in the industry, who are incredibly smart individuals and great engineers.

The technology you use to build your solutions is just a tool. Coming out of school you have the ability to really apply for any position and they won't care that much if you don't know the language or specific technology they use. They use the interview to gauge your understanding of concepts and the fact that a reputable university gave you a BS as a form of assurance that you'll be able to learn on the job. Obviously taking some electives to get some experience into modern industry used technologies can help give you a slight edge, but it's not necessary.

I got my BS in computer science and came out of school only really knowing Java, C++, C, and some SQL. I ended up getting a job at a company that uses the Microsoft technology stack (.net framework). I learned C# and Javascript on the job and am now proficient at both. I've also worked in PHP, Python, and sadly VB script. It's just a syntax change at that point.
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