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It's 2014. Why is migrating from one PC to another still such a pain in the ass?

#21codyorrPosted 7/6/2014 10:51:45 AM
TimePharaoh posted...
You have hundreds of programs you need?
#22ElDudorinoPosted 7/6/2014 12:47:10 PM(edited)
I was just writing in a different thread the other day about how much easier it is to migrate to a new PC nowadays.

It seems like during the Windows 98 era, anything that you installed would create a registry entry and then would refuse to run if that registry entry disappeared. So, upon accessing the executable from a fresh Windows install, you'd find that your software no longer runs unless you either re-install it or restore/re-create the registry entry somehow.

When switching from Windows 7 to Windows 8.1, I found that the number of programs I could no longer use due to missing registry entries was somewhere around, like... two. Out of dozens of programs I've run. Windows 8 even created Start Menu (or whatever you call it) entries for some software that was installed in my old OS.

So, I definitely can't agree about it being a pain in the ass to migrate from one system to another. Registry entries were really the only thing that ever bothered me about switching systems, and software seems to be a lot smarter about how it handles them now. Hell, hardware drivers usually find THEMSELVES on a desktop, so other than laptops (which often have System Restore functions that restore all of your drivers) and the odd exception here and there you can pretty much skip that step as well. Just install CCCP for your video viewing pleasure and maybe Acrobat Reader and MS Office and you're good.

Now, if you're re-formatting your hard disk and completely erasing all of your software before switching to another OS or another computer, that's on you.
#23Boo_Mario(Topic Creator)Posted 7/10/2014 12:29:54 AM
ElDudorino posted...
I was just writing in a different thread the other day about how much easier it is to migrate to a new PC nowadays.

It seems like during the Windows 98 era, anything that you installed would create a registry entry and then would refuse to run if that registry entry disappeared. So, upon accessing the executable from a fresh Windows install, you'd find that your software no longer runs unless you either re-install it or restore/re-create the registry entry somehow.

When switching from Windows 7 to Windows 8.1, I found that the number of programs I could no longer use due to missing registry entries was somewhere around, like... two. Out of dozens of programs I've run. Windows 8 even created Start Menu (or whatever you call it) entries for some software that was installed in my old OS.

So, I definitely can't agree about it being a pain in the ass to migrate from one system to another. Registry entries were really the only thing that ever bothered me about switching systems, and software seems to be a lot smarter about how it handles them now. Hell, hardware drivers usually find THEMSELVES on a desktop, so other than laptops (which often have System Restore functions that restore all of your drivers) and the odd exception here and there you can pretty much skip that step as well. Just install CCCP for your video viewing pleasure and maybe Acrobat Reader and MS Office and you're good.

Now, if you're re-formatting your hard disk and completely erasing all of your software before switching to another OS or another computer, that's on you.


Did you just "upgrade" from win7 to 8.1 on the same machine, or switch to a new computer entirely?
#24I_I_I_IPosted 7/10/2014 12:34:28 AM
Boo_Mario posted...
Did you just "upgrade" from win7 to 8.1


Shut the f*** up
#25ElDudorinoPosted 7/10/2014 2:35:19 AM
Doesn't matter which option you use.

In the recent example above, I was keeping all of the same hardware except for my SSD, which died and had to be replaced. I performed a fresh install of Windows 8.1 onto an empty SSD, so I could not use the "Upgrade" function (not that I would ever use that function anyway - it goes against my beliefs).

Prior to that, I changed my motherboard and replaced my CPU and RAM, replaced the graphics card, copied all of my data on my storage drive from a 250GB hard disk over to a 1TB hard disk and installed Windows 7 on a new SSD. It wasn't really any different then. It seems to me that either modern software has become a lot less moronic about relying on registry entries to start, or modern versions of Windows have found ways to work around not having intact registry entries. I believe this change dates back to around the Vista days, since I haven't really had to get angry about a hard disk full of registry-less software since Windows XP some years ago.

Then, as for drivers, like I said before they're pretty much a non-issue as long as you have an internet connection.
#26Davel23Posted 7/10/2014 4:09:56 AM
nIMr0D888 posted...
Windows has a feature called easy transfer, perhaps you should use it...


I have always been a big proponent of Windows Easy Transfer. However, Microsoft in their infinite wisdom have decided that it's no longer necessary and are depreciating it. The version in 8.1 is severely reduced in functionality, and I assume it will be completely removed from Windows in the next version.
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#27Flaktrooper123Posted 7/10/2014 4:12:08 AM
I am still using my old hard drive. Maybe because I am too lazy to migrate everything to my new hard drive. Maybe I should clean up that old hard drive so I can revive my old PC, and probably connect it to my TV.
#28r7gerrabbitPosted 7/10/2014 4:14:10 AM
I use multiple hard drives.
My SSD is for the OS and mission critical applications.

Then I have two 2TB drives. One for games, and one for everything else.

When I do a fresh install I only have to do keyboard driver, sound driver, graphics driver, and motherboard CD. Takes 20 minutes tops.
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#29GoldninjaPosted 7/10/2014 6:21:14 AM
I don't see the problem. Unless you have a snail for an internet connection, it's as simple as downloading what you need and installing. It doesn't take that long.
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#30Bossdog421Posted 7/10/2014 6:38:30 AM
I completely format and install a fresh copy of windows at least twice a year. I rely on my laptop for 7 day a week work and have tons of important files and programs.

I do a back up once a month of all of my important documents and files. I created images of all the programs i use.

If my computer exploded today, the longest part of it would be waiting on the replacement to be shipped to me. It takes me about 2 hours to be COMPLETELY up and running after a format with my drivers / updates in place and my critical work files / programs ready to be used.

Getting my game library back takes a bit longer but i typically get one installed and let everything else download in the back ground as i work or play the first game.

It is not a big deal at all to migrate data in this day and age.
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