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Thinking about getting into Web Design what all should I know?

#1ThePaleRiderpPosted 7/10/2014 3:38:14 PM
It's something that's interested me for a while now so I thought I'd give it a try. Anything you guys recommend? Software, languages etc.
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#2ChromaticAngelPosted 7/10/2014 4:03:12 PM
start making basic static HTML pages, then style them with CSS, then start experimenting with Javascript, then pick up something for the back end. My 2 suggestions are C#/ASP.NET (download Visual Studio Express for Web, the IDE is incredible) or use Ruby on Rails.
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#3ThePaleRiderp(Topic Creator)Posted 7/10/2014 4:07:25 PM
ChromaticAngel posted...
start making basic static HTML pages, then style them with CSS, then start experimenting with Javascript, then pick up something for the back end. My 2 suggestions are C#/ASP.NET (download Visual Studio Express for Web, the IDE is incredible) or use Ruby on Rails.


Thanks!
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#4SoulreaperX112Posted 7/10/2014 4:09:25 PM
http://www.codecademy.com/tracks/web

If you don't have any experience you can use this to learn some HTML and CSS. It covers a decent amount of both languages, for a beginner at least, and it throws in a few projects along the way.
#5ThePaleRiderp(Topic Creator)Posted 7/10/2014 4:13:18 PM
SoulreaperX112 posted...
http://www.codecademy.com/tracks/web

If you don't have any experience you can use this to learn some HTML and CSS. It covers a decent amount of both languages, for a beginner at least, and it throws in a few projects along the way.


Sweet thanks man.
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#6SoulreaperX112Posted 7/10/2014 7:14:16 PM
Np, There is also another website called khanacademy(i think) and I believe it has some language lessons as well along with a bunch of other stuff.
#7CatalystGuitar18Posted 7/10/2014 7:36:02 PM(edited)
If you want to learn Web Design (i.e. you just design the pages. Someone else codes them), you're going to want to learn graphic design.

If you want to be a web designer and web developer (ie you design and code the pages), then you're going to want to listen to Three Devs and a Maybe podcast, as they will lay out what you need to do pretty well. I'd recommend learning HTML, then CSS, then google Eloquent Javascript and read that thirteen times, read JavaScript: The Good Parts, and then start doing Kata's at www.codewars.com until you feel comfortable doing your own projects. Learn jQuery and Ember.js.

Then you can learn PHP / Python / or Ruby on Rails, JavaScript MV* frameworks, Terminal, Git, all about the web stack, etc. etc. Really, this is nonsensical. Hire a back-end dev and just focus on front end if you want to be a designer developer. Nobody can be good at everything.

In terms of graphic design, here are some essential reads:

Typography
-- The Elements of Typographic Style 4.0 by Robert Bringhurst.
---- It's simply one of the greatest novels ever written on typography and is a must have for anybody.
-- Logo, Font & Lettering Bible by Leslie Cabarga.
---- Very good and often brutal advice on lettering and type design.

Color
-- The Interaction of Color: 50th Anniversary Edition by Josef Albers
---- Get the iPad app if you can. This is an essential color book for layout design, especially with flat layouts being 'in' these days.
-- Color and Light by James Gurney.
---- This is more of a painting book, but Gurney describes color and color theory in an illustrative context better than anyone.

Photography
-- Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson.
---- Learn the fundamentals of photography and how to use your camera.
-- Photography Q & A by Zach Arias.
---- Tough love. How to get started. Generally very motivating. Zach is my go-to guy for getting a kick in the ass to get back to work.

UI Design
-- Don't Make Me Think! 3 by Steve Krug.
---- Basic, but fundamental and entertaining.
-- The Design of Everyday Things by Donald A. Norman.
---- Describes in great detail the way people think when using devices. Norman was the guy who started the user experience field at Apple, so I'd say that anything he says is relevant to the highest degree.

Drawing and Illustration
-- How to Draw by Scott Robertson
---- Most drawing books suck and offer nothing of value. That is simply not the case here. Very perspective focused, and very, very detailed and complex.

Psychology + Design Principles
-- Universal Principles of Design: Revised by Lidwell and Holden
---- Lays out everything you need to know about design in an easy format. Essential.
-- Universal Methods of Design by Hanington
---- How to go about designing something through research. Indispensable.

Reference
-- Anything by Steven Heller. Take your pick.
-- Anything by Chris Ware. His style is fantastic. The big Acme Novelty Library book w/ the red cover is impeccably designed, albeit depressing to read. -- Anything published by Phaidon. They're expensive, but god damn are they beautiful.
-- http://www.webdesignrepo.com/ has everything web design and development related that you could possibly want.
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#8ThePaleRiderp(Topic Creator)Posted 7/10/2014 7:53:21 PM
CatalystGuitar18 posted...
If you want to learn Web Design (i.e. you just design the pages. Someone else codes them), you're going to want to learn graphic design.

If you want to be a web designer and web developer (ie you design and code the pages), then you're going to want to listen to Three Devs and a Maybe podcast, as they will lay out what you need to do pretty well. I'd recommend learning HTML, then CSS, then google Eloquent Javascript and read that thirteen times, read JavaScript: The Good Parts, and then start doing Kata's at www.codewars.com until you feel comfortable doing your own projects. Learn jQuery and Ember.js.

Then you can learn PHP / Python / or Ruby on Rails, JavaScript MV* frameworks, Terminal, Git, all about the web stack, etc. etc. Really, this is nonsensical. Hire a back-end dev and just focus on front end if you want to be a designer developer. Nobody can be good at everything.

In terms of graphic design, here are some essential reads:

Typography
-- The Elements of Typographic Style 4.0 by Robert Bringhurst.
---- It's simply one of the greatest novels ever written on typography and is a must have for anybody.
-- Logo, Font & Lettering Bible by Leslie Cabarga.
---- Very good and often brutal advice on lettering and type design.

Color
-- The Interaction of Color: 50th Anniversary Edition by Josef Albers
---- Get the iPad app if you can. This is an essential color book for layout design, especially with flat layouts being 'in' these days.
-- Color and Light by James Gurney.
---- This is more of a painting book, but Gurney describes color and color theory in an illustrative context better than anyone.

Photography
-- Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson.
---- Learn the fundamentals of photography and how to use your camera.
-- Photography Q & A by Zach Arias.
---- Tough love. How to get started. Generally very motivating. Zach is my go-to guy for getting a kick in the ass to get back to work.

UI Design
-- Don't Make Me Think! 3 by Steve Krug.
---- Basic, but fundamental and entertaining.
-- The Design of Everyday Things by Donald A. Norman.
---- Describes in great detail the way people think when using devices. Norman was the guy who started the user experience field at Apple, so I'd say that anything he says is relevant to the highest degree.

Drawing and Illustration
-- How to Draw by Scott Robertson
---- Most drawing books suck and offer nothing of value. That is simply not the case here. Very perspective focused, and very, very detailed and complex.

Psychology + Design Principles
-- Universal Principles of Design: Revised by Lidwell and Holden
---- Lays out everything you need to know about design in an easy format. Essential.
-- Universal Methods of Design by Hanington
---- How to go about designing something through research. Indispensable.

Reference
-- Anything by Steven Heller. Take your pick.
-- Anything by Chris Ware. His style is fantastic. The big Acme Novelty Library book w/ the red cover is impeccably designed, albeit depressing to read. -- Anything published by Phaidon. They're expensive, but god damn are they beautiful.
-- http://www.webdesignrepo.com/ has everything web design and development related that you could possibly want.


God bless you sir.
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Valar morghulis
#9Brutal_FelixPosted 7/10/2014 8:01:17 PM
CatalystGuitar18 posted...
If you want to learn Web Design (i.e. you just design the pages. Someone else codes them), you're going to want to learn graphic design.

If you want to be a web designer and web developer (ie you design and code the pages), then you're going to want to listen to Three Devs and a Maybe podcast, as they will lay out what you need to do pretty well. I'd recommend learning HTML, then CSS, then google Eloquent Javascript and read that thirteen times, read JavaScript: The Good Parts, and then start doing Kata's at www.codewars.com until you feel comfortable doing your own projects. Learn jQuery and Ember.js.

Then you can learn PHP / Python / or Ruby on Rails, JavaScript MV* frameworks, Terminal, Git, all about the web stack, etc. etc. Really, this is nonsensical. Hire a back-end dev and just focus on front end if you want to be a designer developer. Nobody can be good at everything.

In terms of graphic design, here are some essential reads:

Typography
-- The Elements of Typographic Style 4.0 by Robert Bringhurst.
---- It's simply one of the greatest novels ever written on typography and is a must have for anybody.
-- Logo, Font & Lettering Bible by Leslie Cabarga.
---- Very good and often brutal advice on lettering and type design.

Color
-- The Interaction of Color: 50th Anniversary Edition by Josef Albers
---- Get the iPad app if you can. This is an essential color book for layout design, especially with flat layouts being 'in' these days.
-- Color and Light by James Gurney.
---- This is more of a painting book, but Gurney describes color and color theory in an illustrative context better than anyone.

Photography
-- Understanding Exposure by Bryan Peterson.
---- Learn the fundamentals of photography and how to use your camera.
-- Photography Q & A by Zach Arias.
---- Tough love. How to get started. Generally very motivating. Zach is my go-to guy for getting a kick in the ass to get back to work.

UI Design
-- Don't Make Me Think! 3 by Steve Krug.
---- Basic, but fundamental and entertaining.
-- The Design of Everyday Things by Donald A. Norman.
---- Describes in great detail the way people think when using devices. Norman was the guy who started the user experience field at Apple, so I'd say that anything he says is relevant to the highest degree.

Drawing and Illustration
-- How to Draw by Scott Robertson
---- Most drawing books suck and offer nothing of value. That is simply not the case here. Very perspective focused, and very, very detailed and complex.

Psychology + Design Principles
-- Universal Principles of Design: Revised by Lidwell and Holden
---- Lays out everything you need to know about design in an easy format. Essential.
-- Universal Methods of Design by Hanington
---- How to go about designing something through research. Indispensable.

Reference
-- Anything by Steven Heller. Take your pick.
-- Anything by Chris Ware. His style is fantastic. The big Acme Novelty Library book w/ the red cover is impeccably designed, albeit depressing to read. -- Anything published by Phaidon. They're expensive, but god damn are they beautiful.
-- http://www.webdesignrepo.com/ has everything web design and development related that you could possibly want.
---
PSN ID: Senor_Rub_a_Dub



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