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What is the best way to get started on programming?

#11r7gerrabbitPosted 7/11/2014 7:42:47 PM(edited)
dataDyneSoldier posted...
Sorry for the bump. Just wondering what path I should take at my age.


Depends entirely on what you want to do.
There are programmers in every single industry on the face of this planet.
Then there are programmers that write the tools that other programmers use to compile their work.
Then there are programmers writing code for your car, your coffee maker, your microwave.
Then there are programmers making websites.
Some make games.
Some study the theories behind it and do it academically.
Some make phone apps.
Any piece of technology on this planet has some programmer writing something for it. And everything varies so wildly.

The very first step is to find out if you enjoy it or not.

http://www.codecademy.com/
It's a good resource. Python is particularly a good starting point.

Learn basic logic, learn the ins and outs. Write some small little applications that make use of that language.

If you enjoy it then go to a college or something and take a course. If you want to do it your own way then find out what interests you, learn about the languages that industry uses, and go at it.

Most importantly, do not expect to know everything off the bat. The software industry is so large, and so vast that one person can never learn it all, and if you decide to turn it into a career then be prepared for life long learning.

As a newcomer it takes time in the beginning, and the applications you write will be so basic that it seems stupid, but these are teaching you the building blocks, everything software related builds on the basic logic that any beginner course will teach you.
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#12urtvPosted 7/11/2014 7:44:28 PM
so you are basically trying to completely change your job into a field you dont even know if you will like?
#13dataDyneSoldier(Topic Creator)Posted 7/11/2014 8:11:29 PM(edited)
urtv posted...
so you are basically trying to completely change your job into a field you dont even know if you will like?


I'm not completely changing my job. I have a job that I don't like, but it's not like I quit it or anything. I have a sudden interest in programming and am trying it out. It just seems to be a profession that most people begin ten years earlier in life, and I'd like to know if it's worth getting into at my early thirties. I love computers, I've built computers, I've repaired them. But programming has been that one thing I've wanted to do but never got around to. Now that I'm starting to learn, it seems like it would make for a good career.

I would LOVE to work on video games, for example. Again, my main fear is that I'd be starting a little too late.
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#14dataDyneSoldier(Topic Creator)Posted 7/11/2014 8:10:38 PM
r7gerrabbit posted...
dataDyneSoldier posted...
Sorry for the bump. Just wondering what path I should take at my age.


Depends entirely on what you want to do.
There are programmers in every single industry on the face of this planet.
Then there are programmers that write the tools that other programmers use to compile their work.
Then there are programmers writing code for your car, your coffee maker, your microwave.
Then there are programmers making websites.
Some make games.
Some study the theories behind it and do it academically.
Some make phone apps.
Any piece of technology on this planet has some programmer writing something for it. And everything varies so wildly.

The very first step is to find out if you enjoy it or not.

http://www.codecademy.com/
It's a good resource. Python is particularly a good starting point.

Learn basic logic, learn the ins and outs. Write some small little applications that make use of that language.

If you enjoy it then go to a college or something and take a course. If you want to do it your own way then find out what interests you, learn about the languages that industry uses, and go at it.

Most importantly, do not expect to know everything off the bat. The software industry is so large, and so vast that one person can never learn it all, and if you decide to turn it into a career then be prepared for life long learning.

As a newcomer it takes time in the beginning, and the applications you write will be so basic that it seems stupid, but these are teaching you the building blocks, everything software related builds on the basic logic that any beginner course will teach you.


Yeah, I've been working with javascript and it is indeed complicated but I'm loving the challenge of it. Going to check out HTML next, and then take a look at Python. It's just exciting because it just feels like I'm working toward something productive for once.

Ideally, I'd love to work on video game software. But I'm trying different things. I wouldn't mind designing websites, apps, or anything. But yeah, video games designing would be my dream career.
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BOlieve! http://i.imgur.com/ABd2uA1.gif
"You may not like him, Minister. But you can't deny: Dumbledore's got style."
#1530aught6Posted 7/11/2014 8:15:44 PM
dataDyneSoldier posted...
r7gerrabbit posted...
dataDyneSoldier posted...
Sorry for the bump. Just wondering what path I should take at my age.


Depends entirely on what you want to do.
There are programmers in every single industry on the face of this planet.
Then there are programmers that write the tools that other programmers use to compile their work.
Then there are programmers writing code for your car, your coffee maker, your microwave.
Then there are programmers making websites.
Some make games.
Some study the theories behind it and do it academically.
Some make phone apps.
Any piece of technology on this planet has some programmer writing something for it. And everything varies so wildly.

The very first step is to find out if you enjoy it or not.

http://www.codecademy.com/
It's a good resource. Python is particularly a good starting point.

Learn basic logic, learn the ins and outs. Write some small little applications that make use of that language.

If you enjoy it then go to a college or something and take a course. If you want to do it your own way then find out what interests you, learn about the languages that industry uses, and go at it.

Most importantly, do not expect to know everything off the bat. The software industry is so large, and so vast that one person can never learn it all, and if you decide to turn it into a career then be prepared for life long learning.

As a newcomer it takes time in the beginning, and the applications you write will be so basic that it seems stupid, but these are teaching you the building blocks, everything software related builds on the basic logic that any beginner course will teach you.


Yeah, I've been working with javascript and it is indeed complicated but I'm loving the challenge of it. Going to check out HTML next, and then take a look at Python. It's just exciting because it just feels like I'm working toward something productive for once.

Ideally, I'd love to work on video game software. But I'm trying different things. I wouldn't mind designing websites, apps, or anything. But yeah, video games designing would be my dream career.


I hope you realize that most people who work in the industry don't like games they're working on.
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#16dataDyneSoldier(Topic Creator)Posted 7/11/2014 8:21:00 PM(edited)
30aught6 posted...
dataDyneSoldier posted...
r7gerrabbit posted...
dataDyneSoldier posted...
Sorry for the bump. Just wondering what path I should take at my age.


Depends entirely on what you want to do.
There are programmers in every single industry on the face of this planet.
Then there are programmers that write the tools that other programmers use to compile their work.
Then there are programmers writing code for your car, your coffee maker, your microwave.
Then there are programmers making websites.
Some make games.
Some study the theories behind it and do it academically.
Some make phone apps.
Any piece of technology on this planet has some programmer writing something for it. And everything varies so wildly.

The very first step is to find out if you enjoy it or not.

http://www.codecademy.com/
It's a good resource. Python is particularly a good starting point.

Learn basic logic, learn the ins and outs. Write some small little applications that make use of that language.

If you enjoy it then go to a college or something and take a course. If you want to do it your own way then find out what interests you, learn about the languages that industry uses, and go at it.

Most importantly, do not expect to know everything off the bat. The software industry is so large, and so vast that one person can never learn it all, and if you decide to turn it into a career then be prepared for life long learning.

As a newcomer it takes time in the beginning, and the applications you write will be so basic that it seems stupid, but these are teaching you the building blocks, everything software related builds on the basic logic that any beginner course will teach you.


Yeah, I've been working with javascript and it is indeed complicated but I'm loving the challenge of it. Going to check out HTML next, and then take a look at Python. It's just exciting because it just feels like I'm working toward something productive for once.

Ideally, I'd love to work on video game software. But I'm trying different things. I wouldn't mind designing websites, apps, or anything. But yeah, video games designing would be my dream career.


I hope you realize that most people who work in the industry don't like games they're working on.


I know. And to be honest, I hate my current job anyway and it's really just that: A job. Not a career (Starbucks). I'm off to a late start and just kind of decided that this was the type of career I'd like to pursue. If it doesn't work out it doesn't work out. But I want to TRY.

In a perfect world, I'll start my own company and create my own games eventually with a good team by my side. That's not going to happen right away. I'd just like to know how to get to that point from being a beginner, and if it's okay for someone to get started in their early 30s or if I'm too late.
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"You may not like him, Minister. But you can't deny: Dumbledore's got style."
#17shmirlywhirlPosted 7/11/2014 8:33:37 PM
This going to sound rude but I completely don't mean it that way.

Don't use the "boohoo I'm almost 30" excuse. You're giving yourself a reason why it's okay to fail. You're 30 for whatever's sake. You still have a long life ahead of you. Yes people will have a head start on you but when has that ever stopped anyone.

Granted, I'm only 22, but I've been working as a freelance programer for about two years. If you want to make it in the game industry, you're going to need to show some more drive. Just follow the advice in this thread and start small. Codeacademy and codescool (maybe khan academy) will be invaluable resources.
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#18dataDyneSoldier(Topic Creator)Posted 7/11/2014 8:49:31 PM
shmirlywhirl posted...
This going to sound rude but I completely don't mean it that way.

Don't use the "boohoo I'm almost 30" excuse. You're giving yourself a reason why it's okay to fail. You're 30 for whatever's sake. You still have a long life ahead of you. Yes people will have a head start on you but when has that ever stopped anyone.

Granted, I'm only 22, but I've been working as a freelance programer for about two years. If you want to make it in the game industry, you're going to need to show some more drive. Just follow the advice in this thread and start small. Codeacademy and codescool (maybe khan academy) will be invaluable resources.


I don't find it rude it all. It just seems to me like a profession where so many people are younger than I am. But you're right: I'm not an old man or anything. It's not really an excuse, as much as a "roadblock". I'm just intimidated because I don't really know how to go about it.

I've pretty much decided on learning C++, HTML, Java, and Python until I know it front to back. I'll dedicate almost all my free time to doing so. And hopefully by then I'll have a good career plan.

I've been going through Codeacademy but they don't seem to have any lessons on C++. Any recommendations as far as that goes?
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BOlieve! http://i.imgur.com/ABd2uA1.gif
"You may not like him, Minister. But you can't deny: Dumbledore's got style."
#19clowningPosted 7/11/2014 10:25:17 PM
You're only too old when you're dead.
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It is a capital mistake to theorize before one has data. ...one begins to twist facts to suit theories.... Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
#20shmirlywhirlPosted 7/11/2014 10:37:11 PM
If you can get free courses in Java that's a good place to start. But really the languages are just tools. It's important you get the logic and the principles down. Those will follow you between languages.

Basically keep the big picture in mind. Learn why the programming standards are the way they are.
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