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how much of a difference is there between 25ms and 40ms input lag

#41axelfooley2k5(Topic Creator)Posted 7/23/2014 3:25:48 PM
TimePharaoh posted...
axelfooley2k5 posted...


i have a gaming laptop


No you don't.


yea i do
why ?
#42axelfooley2k5(Topic Creator)Posted 7/23/2014 3:26:51 PM
on it right now

unless you are saying the lenovo is weak
it kinda is
#43ClouddxPosted 7/23/2014 3:59:45 PM
axelfooley2k5 posted...
on it right now

unless you are saying the lenovo is weak
it kinda is


No, he's implying that there are no such things as gaming laptops. Meaning all laptops are weak; which certainly isn't true.
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#44HylianZPosted 7/23/2014 4:01:00 PM
If anyone is curious, before i posted, I googled how long it takes to blink and I found this on top: http://www.madsci.org/posts/archives/1998-11/911697403.Me.r.html

So I wasn't pulling it from nowhere.
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#45Edavy89Posted 7/23/2014 6:09:08 PM
ElDudorino posted...
You're talking about a little less than one frame of difference, so it's still pretty minuscule and I think that would only matter if you're pretty hardcore.

The above exchange about two people lining up their sights and firing on one another simultaneously has gotten a bit ridiculous. What are the odds of two people pulling the trigger at the same visual 'moment?' Probably not that high, but obviously higher in games with hardcore player bases like Unreal Tournament. But, does that extra frame of leeway help you line up your shot better, or help you duck behind a wall to AVOID a shot coming your way? Of course!

How much it helps is probably up to our imaginations since I think all of the 'science' in this topic has been pretty off-base, but every fraction of a second has to help for sure when you're in a scramble.


I never post off base science...

http://www.colorado.edu/eeb/courses/1230jbasey/abstracts%202005/5.htm

http://biae.clemson.edu/bpc/bp/Lab/110/reaction.htm
#46ElDudorinoPosted 7/24/2014 7:05:15 AM
It looks like plenty of work went into studying reaction times, but that fails to take into account the fact that one person's opportunity to react is potentially arriving after another person's. If two people have to react to a visual stimulus and one person is given a one-frame head-start, they have an advantage of one frame that's independent of their own personal response time. Where's the study showing how much of an advantage a one-frame head start is (or isn't)?
#47Edavy89Posted 7/24/2014 8:02:34 AM
ElDudorino posted...
It looks like plenty of work went into studying reaction times, but that fails to take into account the fact that one person's opportunity to react is potentially arriving after another person's. If two people have to react to a visual stimulus and one person is given a one-frame head-start, they have an advantage of one frame that's independent of their own personal response time. Where's the study showing how much of an advantage a one-frame head start is (or isn't)?


How much can you legitimately accomplish in 16ms? it takes 7 times that long just to blink. We are talking about a measurement of time so miniscule that it is beyond the human brains capacity for recognition in real time.