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Recommend me a keyboard?

#11ClouddxPosted 7/30/2014 3:59:52 PM
HaMMeRHeaD25 posted...
the font on the deck keycaps looks terribly childish and they span the entire cap, meaning the backlighting doesn't even light them well so they look even worse in the dark.


That's just not true. Each key has an individual backlight. I own two of their keyboards and each key is lit up perfectly.
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i7-920 @ 3.6 // 770 GTX // 12 GB G.Skill Sniper Ram // PS3 // 360
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#12Perfect LightPosted 7/30/2014 4:02:57 PM
I have a Saitek Eclipse III and I love it.
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#13Garage_ManPosted 7/30/2014 4:04:17 PM
PraetorXyn posted...
Dorami posted...
Clouddx posted...
Deck, their build quality is absolutely amazing.

I do not see anything in their build quality that justifies the enormous price premium.


The way they print keycaps. The use a custom sublimination process in which they have a white keytop that inserts into a black skirt. The white top is heated so hot that the plastic is melted, and they set black dye on it so that it will cover everything except the letter in black. The dye subliminates into the melted plastic and becomes part of it, so no matter what happens, the lettering will never rub off or fade in the slightest. It's an expensive process, and they're the only company that does it.

Deck also uses Costar stabilizers under the long keys, which feel like actual mechanical keys. Pretty much every other backlit keyboard besides CM Quickfire boards uses Cherry stabilizers, which feel mushy like membrane keyboards.

There is an individual LED under every single key on Deck boards, as opposed to most boards which will have some number of LED's and use light diffusers to spread the light around under all the keys.

EDIT: I should also mention it isn't an enormous premium. Filco Majestouch V2 is close in price. It's only excessive compared to the <$100 Cooler Master Quickfire boards that uses Costar stabilizers like Deck does.

Most people on these boards however recommend Corsair, which are around $130 and don't have the build quality to justify it, and Ducky, which cost about $150+ because you have to import them. The reason I recommend Deck is because if you're going to buy a Ducky, you may as well spend a little more and get something far better.


I like my ducky and wouldn't get the deck BUT there is no doubt the keys would be better. These you can ever so slightly feel it, I have been thinking about getting new keycaps.

ALSO the point about the space bar is very true. It isn't as mushy as say a membrane but it is. Still for $160 I am pleased.
#14Lemur_HPosted 7/30/2014 4:22:07 PM
http://www.daskeyboard.com/daskeyboard-4-professional/
#15pwnater777Posted 7/30/2014 4:26:36 PM
I personally own and love a Roccat ISKU. The thing is pretty large, but an amazing keyboard and the extra keys can be configured to help with more day-to-day uses than you'd expect. Also, the backlighting can be dimmed or turned off, if that better suits your work environment.
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#16DoramiPosted 7/30/2014 6:42:33 PM(edited)
PraetorXyn posted...
The use a custom sublimination process in which they have a white keytop that inserts into a black skirt. The white top is heated so hot that the plastic is melted, and they set black dye on it so that it will cover everything except the letter in black.

I'm pretty sure it's doubleshot with a white piece inserted into a hole in a black cover. But regardless of what it actually is, the advantages and disadvantages of the method can be seen in this link (explained below): www.mechkb.com/blog/mechkb-labs/genuine-deck-hassium-doubleshot/

so no matter what happens, the lettering will never rub off or fade in the slightest.

One advantage of doubleshot over dye sub is solvent resistance. In the link, the dye sub Ducky keycap had some dye runoff when submerged in paint thinner, while the Hassium keycap wasn't affected. But it doesn't matter for two reasons: First, this only matters in industrial environments, where you should use industrial keyboards. Second, you can see from the Mionix keycap that solvents that can cause dye runoff will melt ABS plastic. Deck keyboards use ABS plastic for the spacebar.

On the subject of the ABS spacebar: ABS plastic becomes shiny much faster than PBT plastic. This means 1-2 ugly shiny streaks over the spacebar where the thumbs press the key.

The Unicomp and IBM keyboards use full PBT dyesub keycaps. They are more resistant to wear than the Hassium. (Keycool 104ii and Realforce 104U also use PBT caps and ABS spacebar, though Keycool uses laser etching)

There is an individual LED under every single key on Deck boards, as opposed to most boards which will have some number of LED's and use light diffusers to spread the light around under all the keys.

Normally, an advantage to using doubleshot over dye sub is the clarity of legends, but because Deck used PBT instead of ABS, this advantage vanishes.

You can see in the link that the bottom loop of the "5" on the Hassium keycap is narrow and rectangular compared to the rest of the number. This is not a design feature. It's a result of the difficulty of controlling PBT shapes during cooling. The result is unevenly formed legends. This is one reason Deck keyboards have uneven lighting like Hammerhead25 mentioned (the other is that the LED is mounted on the side of the switch rather than within the switch like in the new Cherry RGB switches).

Incidentally, the difficulty of controlling PBT plastic shaping is also why Deck cheaps out with an ABS spacebar.

Note that the only other backlit keyboard on the poll is the Blackwidow Ultimate.

Deck also uses Costar stabilizers under the long keys, which feel like actual mechanical keys. Pretty much every other backlit keyboard besides CM Quickfire boards uses Cherry stabilizers, which feel mushy like membrane keyboards.

The only keyboard on the poll that uses Cherry stabilizers is the Ducky Zero. Keycool, Razer, and Rosewill use Costar stabilizers. IBM, Unicomp, and Realforce do not use Cherry type switches and use their own types of stabilizers.

And, of course, no Cherry type switch has as crisp and precise a feel as buckling spring.

EDIT: I should also mention it isn't an enormous premium. Filco Majestouch V2 is close in price. It's only excessive compared to the <$100 Cooler Master Quickfire boards that uses Costar stabilizers like Deck does.

IBM Model F 122: $300+
Realforce 104U: $210
Deck Hassium Pro: $180
Razer Blackwidow Ultimate: $140
Keycool 104ii: $100
Unicomp Terminal 122-5250: $100
Ducky Zero DK2108: $85
Rosewill RK-9000: $80
IBM Model M 122: ~$50

It looks quite big to me.
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#17Death_BornPosted 7/31/2014 3:20:04 AM(edited)
Get the Ducky Zero or Rosewill. They're cheap, compact and effective. I don't trust Razer at all as a brand and the others are expensive.

The Terminal keyboards are a little too large and too heavy for fast typing. I don't like using buckling springs, they are way too much resistance and tire out my hands.
#18Sora_AnbuPosted 7/31/2014 3:27:30 AM
Master starts with M
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#19GunmaN1905Posted 7/31/2014 4:20:43 AM
Roccat Ryos MK pro, best keyboard I've ever used. German company, what could possibly go wrong.
#20Sora_AnbuPosted 7/31/2014 4:22:27 AM
GunmaN1905 posted...
Roccat Ryos MK pro, best keyboard I've ever used. German company, what could possibly go wrong.


When it starts demanding more space on the desk... That's when you worry.
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