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Why do internet providers advertise in bits and not bytes?

#11Digital StormPosted 8/7/2014 12:22:56 PM
A byte hasn't always been eight bits.

Showing my age now.
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#12SinisterSlayPosted 8/7/2014 12:23:57 PM
Worknofun370 posted...
nonexistinghero posted...
I meant misleading and I already fixed it. And well, there's no way you can claim it's not misleading.


I absolutely can. It's not misleading either. They advertise it as megabits, consumer ignorance doesn't make that misleading.


That actually is pretty much exactly what misleading is.
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#13kingoffpsPosted 8/7/2014 12:25:18 PM
nonexistinghero posted...
DmanTee posted...
It's a psychological numbers game. That is also why some companies advertise their sales as $19.99 instead of $20.00.


It is a bit different though. For the pricing it's just a psychological barrier. But for internet providers... I'd say it's misleading advertising. When downloading things on your computer it's displayed in megabytes. But when internet providers brag about speed, they talk about megabits. And there's a lot of people who don't know there's a difference between MB and Mb. Many people get a contract under the assumption that the advertised speed is MB and not Mb. Rather than advertise with Mbit, they use Mb which is very easy to confuse with MB.


It doesn't help when even people who are reasonably well-versed in technology throw Mb and MB around with no consistency whatsoever. See the other topic.
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#14Worknofun370Posted 8/7/2014 12:25:59 PM
SinisterSlay posted...
That actually is pretty much exactly what misleading is.


Calling a spade a spade is not misleading man. Calling a megabit connecting megabit (which, as I mentioned utilizing bits for network speeds is standard in the networking world) is not misleading at all. Only to the ignorant is it so.

If they did nothing but use mb/s (which, I haven't really seen) while never saying megabits anywhere... that's slightly misleading.
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#15Orestes417Posted 8/7/2014 12:26:29 PM
Digital Storm posted...
A byte hasn't always been eight bits.

Showing my age now.


Now you're making me feel old. Half tempted to break out ye olde book of TCP/IP and make some *****es go crosseyed.

Of course the better question is why they stopped using baud.
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#16Edavy89Posted 8/7/2014 12:27:53 PM
Worknofun370 posted...
nonexistinghero posted...
I meant misleading and I already fixed it. And well, there's no way you can claim it's not misleading.


I absolutely can. It's not misleading either. They advertise it as megabits, consumer ignorance doesn't make that misleading.


Pretty much this. The consumer absolutely has the right to be informed, but it's their own responsibility to educate themselves before they make purchases. The information is readily available, and easy to find, quite frankly if people get dooped by it, they deserve it for not taking the time to educate themselves.
#17nonexistingheroPosted 8/7/2014 12:28:01 PM
Worknofun370 posted...
SinisterSlay posted...
That actually is pretty much exactly what misleading is.


Calling a spade a spade is not misleading man. Calling a megabit connecting megabit (which, as I mentioned utilizing bits for network speeds is standard in the networking world) is not misleading at all. Only to the ignorant is it so.

If they did nothing but use mb/s (which, I haven't really seen) while never saying megabits anywhere... that's slightly misleading.


They specifically advertise in megabits because a lot of people are fooled into thinking they're megabytes. And megabytes is the standard format that just about any computer displays it in. It doesn't matter that they're advertising with the truth, it's still misleading.
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#18SinisterSlayPosted 8/7/2014 12:28:52 PM
Worknofun370 posted...
SinisterSlay posted...
That actually is pretty much exactly what misleading is.


Calling a spade a spade is not misleading man. Calling a megabit connecting megabit (which, as I mentioned utilizing bits for network speeds is standard in the networking world) is not misleading at all. Only to the ignorant is it so.

If they did nothing but use mb/s (which, I haven't really seen) while never saying megabits anywhere... that's slightly misleading.


Ok and Dodge keeps claiming their cars get upwards of 40mpg, which we all know is a lie because thats the mpg the engine gets without a car attached to it.
They aren't wrong, it's just misleading and they get sales because of consumer ignorance.
Is that wrong?
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He who stumbles around in darkness with a stick is blind. But he who... sticks out in darkness... is... fluorescent! - Brother Silence
#19Worknofun370Posted 8/7/2014 12:29:28 PM
nonexistinghero posted...
They specifically advertise in megabits because a lot of people are fooled into thinking they're megabytes.


You know what, support that claim. Lets see some proof that they're advertising in megabits simply to fool people.

I can support my claim that the networking world uses bits for network speed in a millisecond. So you support yours.
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#20Worknofun370Posted 8/7/2014 12:29:59 PM
SinisterSlay posted...
Ok and Dodge keeps claiming their cars get upwards of 40mpg, which we all know is a lie because thats the mpg the engine gets without a car attached to it.
They aren't wrong, it's just misleading and they get sales because of consumer ignorance.
Is that wrong?


That doesn't compare to this situation.
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