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Why do internet providers advertise in bits and not bytes?

#121SinisterSlayPosted 8/8/2014 11:10:28 AM(edited)
OreoBoy206 posted...
SinisterSlay posted...
OreoBoy206 posted...
Yeah, I guess I'm to use to cars down shifting with traditional gears. Something just feels and sounds odd about the RPGs continually going up as you accelerate without the sensation of gear shifting. Nissan and Honda made artificial gear shifting in their new CVTs because consumers were being turned off by what I described, so looks like I wasn't the only one that felt this way.


That's the thing, the RPM's shouldn't build slowly as it accelerates. They should go right to red line and stay there as long as your foot is to the floor. When you take your foot off the floor, they should drop to the correct RPM to maintain speed (or decelerate as the wheels are now turning the engine). Most 4cyl seem to hover at 2300 for 110kph for normal auto and CVT.
That artificial gear shifting hurts performance and fuel economy, they should make it optional.

If you want to see the system done correctly, you need only look at snowmobiles where CVT has been the normal for a very long time.


Yeah, that would probably freak the average consumer out though.. People grew up with traditional automatics in cars so the needle going straight to the red line and staying there until they let off the gas would probably confuse people into thinking something is wrong with their car. The sound of a car constantly staying at red line for long perioids doesn't sound too appealing either.

Also, you're right about the artificial shifting hurting fuel economy, Honda admitted this but said they did it for consumer comfort.


Punishing the educated people :(

Also, I love the sound of my eclipse at the red line.
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He who stumbles around in darkness with a stick is blind. But he who... sticks out in darkness... is... fluorescent! - Brother Silence
#122ThePylonPosted 8/8/2014 11:33:27 AM
Because 8 is bigger then 1, and people are stupid. Combine these 2 facts and it is obvious they choose bits because big numbers make stupid people happy.
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I play too many different games to even care.
#123Andrew ShinnPosted 8/8/2014 11:37:40 AM
really interesting topic. thanks ^_^
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#124HighOnPhazonPosted 8/8/2014 11:40:55 AM
There is no need for anyone to get technical about any of this. It's correctly advertised but it's misleading to the ignorant consumers who don't know the difference between MB's and Mb's

Also, like someone else already said, 15 sounds better than 1.875
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#125fuzzybear69Posted 8/8/2014 12:07:00 PM
Agree with most posters. It just sounds better.
#126CovenantPosted 8/8/2014 12:26:20 PM
I don't think it is a case of misleading advertisement because they give enough information to guide people who don't know anything about the numbers and any independent references are going to be in Mb anyway. You aren't going to go to a Netflix FAQ and see them listing required speeds in MB.

In reality, the only people who are getting fooled by this are people who think they know a lot more about computers than they actually do. That lack of self-awareness and carelessness is their own damn fault.
#127HighOnPhazonPosted 8/8/2014 12:28:58 PM
Covenant posted...
In reality, the only people who are getting fooled by this are people who think they know a lot more about computers than they actually do. That lack of self-awareness and carelessness is their own damn fault.


HighOnPhazon posted...
it's misleading to the ignorant consumers who don't know the difference between MB's and Mb's

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#128MeCaranaPosted 8/8/2014 12:33:35 PM(edited)
I didn't read the thread. I may be repeating what someone else said. But let me teach you. I'm keeping it simple for the neophytes.

They advertise in bits, because the speed of transfer, also known as bandwidth, is calculated by bits.

Looking at it physically, the basic a bit is an eletric signal (light with optic fiber) that is interpreted as 0 or 1.

Bit per second is the amount of bits that can circulate in 1 second on a given surface. That is layer 1 of OSI (the physical layer).

Now they advertise in Mbps Gbps, as the numbers in bits would be too large. and there are also encoding/decoding methods that allow to send less bits for the same data.

Now from this you can convert bits to bytes per second, but it's pointless and less accurate.
#129HighOnPhazonPosted 8/8/2014 12:35:07 PM
MeCarana posted...
I didn't read the thread. I may be repeating what someone else said. But let me teach you. I'm keeping it simple for the neophytes.

They advertise in bits, because the speed of transfer, also known as bandwidth, is calculated by bits.

Looking at it physically, the basic a bit is an eletric signal (light with optic fiber) that is interpreted as 0 or 1.

Bit per second is the amount of bits that can circulate in 1 second on a given surface. That is layer 1 of OSI (the physical layer).

Now they advertise in Mbps Gbps, as the numbers in bits would be too large. and there are also encoding/decoding methods that allow to send less bits for the same data.

Now from this you can convert bits to bytes per second, but it's pointless and less accurate.


There is zero reason to get technical. They advertise in Bits because dumbass consumers think they are getting 20 Mega Bytes per second.
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#130machetemanPosted 8/8/2014 7:42:11 PM
Let's see....router and networking equipment all use Mb to describe their equipment. Programs that require a certain level of bandwidth all use Mb ("A 2 Mb connection is required....<blah blah>"), speed tests that anyone can run from their home computer give their speed in Mb....where is the problem again?

There is no "advantage" for companies to use bigger numbers. If you are paying for a 10 Mb connection (you get ~1.5 MB/s download speeds), and you see another company offering a 50 Mb connection speed, you are saying that the average consumer believes he will jump from 1.5 MB/s to 50 MB/s??? Even though he/she knows their "plan" is called a "10 Mb" plan?

Really?

The bottom line is this. If you are paying for a 1 Mb connection, and you see a company advertise a 50Mb connection...it doesn't matter what numbers you see on your computer (~125KB/s)...you will be getting a 50x increase in speed (~6.25 MB/s) .

6,250,000 / 125,000 = 50

There is nothing misleading about this.