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Why do internet providers advertise in bits and not bytes?

#31Worknofun370Posted 8/7/2014 1:41:25 PM
Digital Storm posted...
You people and your conspiracy theories...


Remember, anything that makes money is evil and does evil things.
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#32Orestes417Posted 8/7/2014 1:44:46 PM(edited)
SinisterSlay posted...
Orestes417 posted...
Seriously though, the distinction is because the number of bits in a byte is not standard. Never has been. If you want to be unambiguous you'd have to use the term octal byte or octet.


There is a byte that has more or less than 8 bits?


Depends on the computer system. Sometimes a byte was 6 bits, sometimes it was 7, sometimes it was even 9 on some 36-bit systems. The proper definition of a byte is the smallest number of bits that can be accessed by a system.
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#33GoldninjaPosted 8/7/2014 1:51:35 PM
Orestes417 posted...
SinisterSlay posted...
Orestes417 posted...
Seriously though, the distinction is because the number of bits in a byte is not standard. Never has been. If you want to be unambiguous you'd have to use the term octal byte or octet.


There is a byte that has more or less than 8 bits?


Depends on the computer system. Sometimes a byte was 6 bits, sometimes it was 7, sometimes it was even 9 on some 36-bit systems. The proper definition of a byte is the smallest number of bits that can be accessed by a system.


Interesting.
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#34SinisterSlayPosted 8/7/2014 1:53:08 PM
Orestes417 posted...
SinisterSlay posted...
Orestes417 posted...
Seriously though, the distinction is because the number of bits in a byte is not standard. Never has been. If you want to be unambiguous you'd have to use the term octal byte or octet.


There is a byte that has more or less than 8 bits?


Depends on the computer system. Sometimes a byte was 6 bits, sometimes it was 7, sometimes it was even 9 on some 36-bit systems. The proper definition of a byte is the smallest number of bits that can be accessed by a system.


Cool I learned something today
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#35ChromaticAngelPosted 8/7/2014 3:12:26 PM
SinisterSlay posted...
Orestes417 posted...
SinisterSlay posted...
Orestes417 posted...
Seriously though, the distinction is because the number of bits in a byte is not standard. Never has been. If you want to be unambiguous you'd have to use the term octal byte or octet.


There is a byte that has more or less than 8 bits?


Depends on the computer system. Sometimes a byte was 6 bits, sometimes it was 7, sometimes it was even 9 on some 36-bit systems. The proper definition of a byte is the smallest number of bits that can be accessed by a system.


Cool I learned something today


Here is something else you can learn:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nibble
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#36rainedownPosted 8/7/2014 4:08:04 PM
SinisterSlay posted...
Come to think of it, I am pretty sure a megabyte is a virus.
http://reboot.wikia.com/wiki/Megabyte


I totally thought it was that one guy from hell raiser.
#37zerodefectPosted 8/7/2014 4:33:37 PM(edited)
The real reason why it's advertised the way it is, is because it's a unified measurement. The number of bits per second does not translate into in bytes per second depending on the technology delivering the information.

For example, a 15 megabit cable connection is faster than a 15 megabit ADSL connection. The reason is encapsulation and the incurred overheads on the delivery. ADSL is notorious as you have close to a 13% overhead over you sync rate (PPPoE, ATM, TCP/IP, etc) that is not all present on cable or ethernet connections.

It's just simpler to advertise the bits per second instead of translating each technology.
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#38JKatarnPosted 8/7/2014 4:39:53 PM
The same reason you'd see those SNES/Genesis catridges with "64 MEGS OF ACTION!" etc. emblazoned on the box - big numbers seem to impress people.
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#39ChromaticAngelPosted 8/7/2014 6:25:25 PM
zerodefect posted...
For example, a 15 megabit cable connection is faster than a 15 megabit ADSL connection. The reason is encapsulation and the incurred overheads on the delivery. ADSL is notorious as you have close to a 13% overhead over you sync rate (PPPoE, ATM, TCP/IP, etc) that is not all present on cable or ethernet connections.


this is not necessarily true.

People typically suffer slow speeds with ADSL because it's run through the phone line, and there is one master line that feeds the entire house, which gets split at various junctions lowering the max bandwidth available--if you get the junction that is closest to the outside line into your house, you will get a guaranteed 15 Mbps, and you won't get a guaranteed 15 Mbps with Cable which will go down just because a lot of folks in your neighborhood happen to be watching their Cable TV at the same time that you're trying to browse your internet.

Another reason ADSL suffers slower speeds is due to the distance it is from a major telephone switch box, folks out in remote ass areas will have slower ADSL speeds than someone living in a major city.

It's all really complex stuff, but the end point I'm trying to make here is that a 15 Mbps ADSL is not actually always slower than 15 Mbps Cable.
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#40r7gerrabbitPosted 8/7/2014 6:30:34 PM
Because networks use bits.
Every piece of networking hardware out there shows bits.
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