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The worst game engine?

#11KillerTrufflePosted 8/8/2014 1:43:22 PM
SinisterSlay posted...
Just edit it to say custom


Or in-house... but you know whoever accepted it to say Havok will just put that right back. Wikipedia is not prone to keeping changes like that long-term.
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"Leave it outside the gates of Troy overnight." -Davel23
#12Futureops-(Topic Creator)Posted 8/8/2014 1:43:49 PM
Sora_Anbu posted...
I much prefer the ls3 to anything ford has


TC is a child.
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#13DRAGON07891230Posted 8/8/2014 1:44:16 PM
No, games don't have just one engine necessarily.
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#14SinisterSlayPosted 8/8/2014 1:44:21 PM
KillerTruffle posted...
SinisterSlay posted...
Just edit it to say custom


Or in-house... but you know whoever accepted it to say Havok will just put that right back. Wikipedia is not prone to keeping changes like that long-term.


Have to put a citation on it then.
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#15KillerTrufflePosted 8/8/2014 1:50:16 PM
Futureops- posted...
I am a newbie (Playing video games from the age of 8). I am now 14, I dont know much about engines, as far as I know, each game uses 1 engine (Crysis uses CryEngine, BF uses Frostbite, 2K mostly uses Unreal Engine) so is there anything more I should know about these engines?

BTW I have used Unity, Unreal Engine and CryEngine but gave up learning how to use them to make games.


So it actually does sound like you don't have too clear a definition on what a "game engine" is. Havok is nothing more than a physics engine. It can tell a game how various objects should react in terms of physics - weight, bounciness, etc. You cannot build a game in Havok - you need an actual game engine for that. You can *use* the Havok physics engine with your game engine to control the physics properties in the game. In fact, some games will use a wide variety of different engines to handle different aspects of the game.

Take Oblivion for instance. It was built on a modified version of the Gamebryo engine, but used Havok for physics, Radiant AI for AI, SpeedTree for foliage, etc. Lots of different engines working together to build the game itself.
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"How do I get rid of a Trojan Horse?" -Sailor_Kakashi
"Leave it outside the gates of Troy overnight." -Davel23
#16Futureops-(Topic Creator)Posted 8/8/2014 1:50:44 PM
DRAGON07891230 posted...
No, games don't have just one engine necessarily.


I am impressed of your sig, I have modded the sniper and kept it on my sig. Can I keep it please?
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#17Lemur_HPosted 8/8/2014 1:51:48 PM
I love dumb middleware tech jokes.

Can't wait for SpeedBoobs.
#18Futureops-(Topic Creator)Posted 8/8/2014 1:52:36 PM
KillerTruffle posted...
Futureops- posted...
I am a newbie (Playing video games from the age of 8). I am now 14, I dont know much about engines, as far as I know, each game uses 1 engine (Crysis uses CryEngine, BF uses Frostbite, 2K mostly uses Unreal Engine) so is there anything more I should know about these engines?

BTW I have used Unity, Unreal Engine and CryEngine but gave up learning how to use them to make games.


So it actually does sound like you don't have too clear a definition on what a "game engine" is. Havok is nothing more than a physics engine. It can tell a game how various objects should react in terms of physics - weight, bounciness, etc. You cannot build a game in Havok - you need an actual game engine for that. You can *use* the Havok physics engine with your game engine to control the physics properties in the game. In fact, some games will use a wide variety of different engines to handle different aspects of the game.

Take Oblivion for instance. It was built on a modified version of the Gamebryo engine, but used Havok for physics, Radiant AI for AI, SpeedTree for foliage, etc. Lots of different engines working together to build the game itself.


Okay, I am clear with the physical engine. What are the other types?
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#19KillerTrufflePosted 8/8/2014 1:58:49 PM
If you want a pure, basic definition, a game engine is the actual software code that makes the game run. It defines things like hitboxes, collision, AI, locating and using resources like models, textures, audio, and animation... everything "behind the scenes" that makes the game actually work. Some engines are released with dev kits that let you more easily apply models, terrain, textures, new game rules, etc. without having to actually code directly to the engine yourself. An engine is basically just a set of rules in computer code for *how* the game works. But an engine can also just be one piece of that - such as physics, for example.
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"How do I get rid of a Trojan Horse?" -Sailor_Kakashi
"Leave it outside the gates of Troy overnight." -Davel23
#20DRAGON07891230Posted 8/8/2014 1:59:07 PM
Futureops- posted...
DRAGON07891230 posted...
No, games don't have just one engine necessarily.


I am impressed of your sig, I have modded the sniper and kept it on my sig. Can I keep it please?


Um, sure.
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