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How does one calculate the total procession power of a computer (flops)?

#1ThisGuy101Posted 8/8/2014 1:48:24 PM
I'm just curious. I remember them saying that the PS4 was 1.84 teraflops or something, and now I'm kind of curious about my overall power with my computer. How do they calculate it?
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#2JinchusePosted 8/8/2014 1:56:19 PM(edited)
The 1.84 teraflops of the PS4 is related only to the GPU AFAIK. It means compute performance. The R9 270x is just a 7870 which was around 2.7ish teraflops.
#3rainedownPosted 8/8/2014 2:17:08 PM
There's programs that will tell you what it is, whetstone is one. The 2.7 sounds right for the GPU there but I believe that cpu is also included in the calculation.
#4rainedownPosted 8/8/2014 2:21:23 PM
If downloading the program sounds like a pain, I can pretty much tell you it'll be around 2.9 tflops, give or take a hundred, as CPUs don't add very much.
#5The cranky hermitPosted 8/8/2014 2:25:57 PM
FLOPS is just one metric of "total computing power," FYI. There's no official standard.

Science Mark and Intel CPU Burn can measure your FLOPS. I have no idea if they can use CUDA or that stuff.
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#6ChromaticAngelPosted 8/8/2014 2:26:38 PM
a flop stands for Floating Point Number Operation, in programming, the primitive or object that contains a floating point number is called a float in most languages, so it's shortened to Float Operations, or FLoat OPerations per Second, or flops.

Flops are important because most graphical and physics related calculations are floating point operations, and not integer calculations, I don't really want to get into why right now, but floating point calculations are harder to do than integer calculations for a CPU, in days of yore, it was considered pretty bad ass to buy a motherboard/cpu that had a math coprocessor designed to do nothing but floating point operations--if you had one, your computer was much faster than everyone else's. These coprocessors are ubiquitous now and most boards leave them off the feature list since not having them is unthinkable.

the amount of flops is determined by how many of these floating point calculations your gpu can perform in a second, this includes addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, bitshifting, modulo, and a few other lesser used ones. More is better, obviously.
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#7ThisGuy101(Topic Creator)Posted 8/8/2014 3:54:31 PM
rainedown posted...
If downloading the program sounds like a pain, I can pretty much tell you it'll be around 2.9 tflops, give or take a hundred, as CPUs don't add very much.


That's great. So that means I'm getting my money's worth with this. I was halfway worried that I was gonna be at about the same power output as the PS4, while spending $300 more. That's good then. I haven't bought any new games yet on this. The newest are Max Payne 3 and Alan Wake, both 2012 games.
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AMD FX-6300 | Gigabyte GA-990FXA-UD3 ATX AM3+ | Kingston HyperX 8GB DDR3-1600 | MSI Radeon R9 270X 2GB TWIN FROZR
My first gaming rig