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I don't understand why so many people try to go for "stable" overclocks

#1CatholicChurchPosted 8/8/2014 4:57:37 PM
I've had CPUs that when overclocked to 4.4 Ghz for instance, they'll fail a stress test after 30 or so minutes, but when playing a PCSX2 game that utilizes your CPU to 100% as well, won't crash at all no matter how long you play. I think people get too caught up in having a CPU that performs well on stress tests with calculations that no CPU would ever perform under any circumstance (except within the stress test of course).

To me, if I can get a lower voltage that allows me to do the tasks that I enjoy on a day to day basis rather than a higher voltage that allows me to "pass" some arbitrary stress test, I'd choose the lower voltage any day.

Thoughts?
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#2shadosnekoPosted 8/8/2014 4:59:40 PM
I'm not sure what you're saying. You're not sure why people don't just keep their CPU's at a voltage/heat level that can damage it?
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#3HydroCannabinolPosted 8/8/2014 5:01:19 PM
Thoughts are if its not stable you're susceptible to BSODs and other crashes.

If it doesn't happen while you're playing a game then I guess its fine but a lot of people like the peace of mind that the PC won't crash due to instability.

It also means that technically your overclock could either be higher with proper settings or remain the same but tweaked for more stability.

Personal preference really...
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#4fataliPosted 8/8/2014 5:05:13 PM
Because not everybody uses their PC just for games, some people make important work that would create a big problem if the information was corrupted.
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#5Edavy89Posted 8/8/2014 5:08:54 PM
fatali posted...
Because not everybody uses their PC just for games, some people make important work that would create a big problem if the information was corrupted.


If you are doing a lot of important work on your PC, why risk overclocking it to begin with?
#6PsythikPosted 8/8/2014 5:09:30 PM
fatali posted...
Because not everybody uses their PC just for games, some people make important work that would create a big problem if the information was corrupted.
This. An unstable OC could f*** up your Excel spreadsheets when it miscalculates the math. Or cause glitches & artifacts when rendering video. Or even cause strange bugs in games that you might assume were just bad programming. It might not seem like it to you, but doing the calculations properly is important.
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#7PsythikPosted 8/8/2014 5:12:54 PM
Edavy89 posted...
fatali posted...
Because not everybody uses their PC just for games, some people make important work that would create a big problem if the information was corrupted.


If you are doing a lot of important work on your PC, why risk overclocking it to begin with?
So that you can get your important work done faster. OCing is relatively safe even for critical work so long as you do it properly.
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#8CatholicChurch(Topic Creator)Posted 8/8/2014 5:15:16 PM
to me I wouldn't even overclock a computer if I had to use it for something as important as work. A lot of people would share my sentiments. There's just too much risk involved, even after "passing" a stress test.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Overclocking#Stability_and_functional_correctness

"A large scale field 2011 study of hardware faults causing a system crash for consumer PCs and laptops showed a 4x to 20x increase (depending on CPU manufacturer) in system crashes due to CPU failure for over-clocked computers over an 8 month period."

I'd bet a lot of those hardware faults were from "stable" CPUs that passed stress tests.
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#9fataliPosted 8/8/2014 5:16:54 PM
You ask why people want a stable OC, that is one of the reasons. I guess you thought there wasn't a reason and now are upset that I give you one?
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#10CatholicChurch(Topic Creator)Posted 8/8/2014 5:18:45 PM
fatali posted...
You ask why people want a stable OC, that is one of the reasons. I guess you thought there wasn't a reason and now are upset that I give you one?


My point is that there's no such thing as a stable OC. You could pass one stress test and then fail another. And over time an overclock becomes unstable, so there's no way to tell when it crosses from "stable" into "unstable" or if it even ever was stable in the first place.

Too many people get hung up on stress tests.
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