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hmmm.. 12k for a 4:9 monitor

#11Erg0nPosted 8/17/2014 8:37:13 AM
i like the part where the screensaveer is palm trees and a beach
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#12PhilOnDezPosted 8/17/2014 8:38:12 AM
Losing the monitor means you lose out on doing work in the present/future, not work that's been done in the past. Read the annotation.
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#13cynicwithin2000Posted 8/17/2014 8:55:19 AM
There is absolutely no reason for this monitor to be that expense other than the fact that it is marketed towards the medical industry. Everything in this industry is overpriced just because they can. I had to buy some sodium hypochlorite last week and the rep wanted to charge me $107 for a 1.8L bottle. It's just diluted bleach. That's all it is.

I can't think of a single professional here that uses one of those types of monitors. Even the radiology techs use regular hp 1080p monitors. Even digital radiographs cannot display grayscale variation at the level that those monitors claim to be able to reproduce, so it's pointless. But it's medical, so why not?
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#14Abiz_Posted 8/17/2014 9:00:24 AM
LikeGoodMorning posted...
I don't know but this topic inspired me to look into how much we can get for oled tv's now. It looks like LG is coming out with a 55 inch 1080p oled tv for $3500 mrsp so that means you can get it for under $3000.

I remember last time I checked for a 55 inch tv oled 1080p was like $9000 so good progress!@

Still seems like it's gonna be awhile to justify a 4k oled tv but now at least you can consider one for you 1080p lovers out there.


I remember on the original vita model people would complain that after a lot of usage it would get a yellow tint, Was that just a vita problem or a oled problem?
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#15PhilOnDezPosted 8/17/2014 9:04:01 AM
It was a problem with all oleds at the time, no idea how far they've come.
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Every time I try to go where I really wanna be it's already where I am, 'cuz I'm already there
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#16Master_BassPosted 8/17/2014 9:17:12 AM
PhilOnDez posted...
It was a problem with all oleds at the time, no idea how far they've come.

I'd say quite far based upon the Galaxy S5's screen. I know I love the thing and am excited for more OLED displays in the future.

http://www.displaymate.com/Galaxy_S5_ShootOut_1.htm
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#17Edavy89Posted 8/17/2014 9:19:03 AM
cynicwithin2000 posted...
There is absolutely no reason for this monitor to be that expense other than the fact that it is marketed towards the medical industry. Everything in this industry is overpriced just because they can. I had to buy some sodium hypochlorite last week and the rep wanted to charge me $107 for a 1.8L bottle. It's just diluted bleach. That's all it is.

I can't think of a single professional here that uses one of those types of monitors. Even the radiology techs use regular hp 1080p monitors. Even digital radiographs cannot display grayscale variation at the level that those monitors claim to be able to reproduce, so it's pointless. But it's medical, so why not?


Just a comment on the cost increase, at least on things like sodium hypochlorite, oxygen, so on so forth, it's a lot more than just "because they can", which, if you are actually in the industry you should be more than aware of. Whenever something is labeled medical grade the expenses involved in producing and distributing skyrocket.

Take oxygen as an example, Oxygen is oxygen, "medical grade" oxygen is absolutely no different than welding oxygen. However a tank used for medical grade oxygen has to be extensively tracked, the tank can not change hands without it being recorded, signed off on, and reported. The tanks also have to go through a decontamination process, because of how it is being used.

The same thing is true for sodium hypochlorite, or any other chemical compounds that aren't exclusively medical in use. Even the factories they are produced in are set to MUCH higher standards, because some small amount of contamination that is entirely benign in home use, could end up killing someone in hospital use.

All those extra's add up, not to mention that liability insurance skyrockets when companies chose to produce "medical grade" anything.
#18cynicwithin2000Posted 8/17/2014 9:38:39 AM
Edavy89 posted...
cynicwithin2000 posted...
There is absolutely no reason for this monitor to be that expense other than the fact that it is marketed towards the medical industry. Everything in this industry is overpriced just because they can. I had to buy some sodium hypochlorite last week and the rep wanted to charge me $107 for a 1.8L bottle. It's just diluted bleach. That's all it is.

I can't think of a single professional here that uses one of those types of monitors. Even the radiology techs use regular hp 1080p monitors. Even digital radiographs cannot display grayscale variation at the level that those monitors claim to be able to reproduce, so it's pointless. But it's medical, so why not?


Just a comment on the cost increase, at least on things like sodium hypochlorite, oxygen, so on so forth, it's a lot more than just "because they can", which, if you are actually in the industry you should be more than aware of. Whenever something is labeled medical grade the expenses involved in producing and distributing skyrocket.

Take oxygen as an example, Oxygen is oxygen, "medical grade" oxygen is absolutely no different than welding oxygen. However a tank used for medical grade oxygen has to be extensively tracked, the tank can not change hands without it being recorded, signed off on, and reported. The tanks also have to go through a decontamination process, because of how it is being used.

The same thing is true for sodium hypochlorite, or any other chemical compounds that aren't exclusively medical in use. Even the factories they are produced in are set to MUCH higher standards, because some small amount of contamination that is entirely benign in home use, could end up killing someone in hospital use.

All those extra's add up, not to mention that liability insurance skyrockets when companies chose to produce "medical grade" anything.


Yes, I am well aware of industry chemical standardization and decontamination polices and procedures. Thank you. The point is that many of these steps have never been proven through study to beneficial to the patient and are completely based on that it sounds good. But that gets into another entire discussion about how our industry is over-sterilizing itself and culturing super bacteria in the process.

There is a big difference between what reps say their products undergo and their actual benefits. The example that just comes to mind is surgical gloves. We all go to extensive lengths to sterilize our hands prior to beginning surgery, then we put on gloves manufactured in a industrial line before beginning. Those gloves are not manufactured in a clean room, they are not treated with a bacteriocidal agent, nor are they tested to make sure they are bacteria free. Yet they are sold as "medical sugical gloves" and charged accordingly. The only products that see increased sterilization and scrutiny are those regulated by the FDA, and their prices are adjusted accordingly.
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#19PhilOnDezPosted 8/17/2014 9:46:14 AM
Master_Bass posted...
PhilOnDez posted...
It was a problem with all oleds at the time, no idea how far they've come.

I'd say quite far based upon the Galaxy S5's screen. I know I love the thing and am excited for more OLED displays in the future.

http://www.displaymate.com/Galaxy_S5_ShootOut_1.htm


The problems aren't really something you can observe in the short term, the Vita's screen looked fantastic as well when they first came out. It's also not really a matter of how much they're used either though I'm sure that's at least a small factor. The panels just degrade with exposure to oxygen, at least the older ones did. The estimated 'looks fantastic' lifespan of the OLED vitas is about two years. They're not just going to die at that point, obviously, but they will fade and yellow. The S5 just hasn't been out long enough to have any issues pop up, the vita has been out for nearly three years, vs about three months for the S5. Maybe it won't have the problems the Vita does, but honestly two years is an alright lifespan for a phone since that's about how often most people I know upgrade since that's how long a contract costs, the PSP had about an 8 year run though, if the vita follows suit the OLED models just won't last.
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Every time I try to go where I really wanna be it's already where I am, 'cuz I'm already there
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#20TalicusPosted 8/17/2014 9:53:29 AM(edited)
Can't you buy a 21:9 monitor with a rotatable pivot, rotate it sideways, rotate the display in Windows and if needed force the display into a 4:9 mode?

There are plenty of programmers who have vertical displays who just use 16:9 monitors sideways.

Edit: Although the title says 4:9 display, the resolution clearly indicates a 5:4 display turned sideways which are really common.
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