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Can someone explain the ins and outs of FXAA? I can't seem to find a conclusive-

#1ajko000Posted 8/22/2014 1:19:55 AM
answer using Google.

Specifically, do I want to enable it with other forms of AA, or not enable it at all? Or, something in between?

I'm also going to be doing this through the NVIDIA Global Control Panel Settings.
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#2YoungAdultLinkPosted 8/22/2014 1:31:32 AM(edited)
FXAA throws a blur filter over the entire screen, aimed at any straight lines. It's the sloppiest, cheapest form of AA. Generally avoid using it, since it targets any straight lines equally, from the edge of your subtitles to lines in textures. Can induce blur in otherwise high quality textures and doesn't add much to your view. Only advantage it has is that it's pretty much free.

You either want 2x whichever AA the game supports, higher if you can handle it, or none at all.
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#3ajko000(Topic Creator)Posted 8/22/2014 1:32:05 AM
YoungAdultLink posted...
FXAA throws a blur filter over the entire screen. It's the sloppiest, cheapest form of AA. Generally avoid using it. You either want 2x whichever AA the game supports, higher if you can handle it, or none at all.


I see, so No AA > FXAA? That's what I was seeing, I just wanted to confirm. Now, what is the difference between 32x CSAA and 16xQ CSAA?
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#4grimsmalicencePosted 8/22/2014 1:35:57 AM
ajko000 posted...
I see, so No AA > FXAA?


no

http://international.download.nvidia.com/webassets/en_US/shared/images/articles/batmanarkhamcity/BACFXAAComparison.png
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#5TheWhoFanPosted 8/22/2014 1:41:28 AM
ajko000 posted...
YoungAdultLink posted...
FXAA throws a blur filter over the entire screen. It's the sloppiest, cheapest form of AA. Generally avoid using it. You either want 2x whichever AA the game supports, higher if you can handle it, or none at all.


I see, so No AA > FXAA?


That depends on what you value more. If you want a crisper image that has more jaggies, go with no AA. If you don't want as many jagged edges, but don't care that the image is "dulled down" by the filter applied to it, go with FXAA.

I personally don't like FXAA, especially when other AA methods are relatively lightweight and produce better results.
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#6ajko000(Topic Creator)Posted 8/22/2014 1:43:20 AM
Oh ok, now do non-FXAA AA methods do the same thing? Or do they retain clarity with the removal of jagged edges? Sorry if I misunderstood, it sounds like you're saying all AA methods blur everything, I just want to confirm.
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#7TropicMoon10Posted 8/22/2014 1:44:52 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NDo5TKr6pyc
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#8YoungAdultLinkPosted 8/22/2014 1:49:40 AM
Other AA methods actually know where the edge of an object is, and only try to fill in missing bits there. The reason FXAA is so simple is because it waits until everything else is done, looks over every line, and then smooths indiscriminately. SSAA literally renders things at double the resolution to fill in the gaps, while other types find their own ways, but generally only apply to actual edges on objects, not on textures.

Basically, just use MSAA, CSAA or SSAA. SSAA will be the most expensive, but produces the same results across pretty much all games. CSAA is MSAA, but is a better implementation of it.
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One day, when I am too old for adventuring, I will settle down and open up a little armor shop called, "Victorious Secret."
#9KaiserWarriorPosted 8/22/2014 6:20:36 AM
No AA: There is no edge-smoothing done. You will have jagged lines all over the place. Higher resolutions dilute this effect, as the edges can be rendered with more fidelity and thus appear less jagged.

Traditional AA (SSAA, CSAA, MSAA, etc.): Various methods for smoothing edges on objects. Computationally expensive, moreso as base resolution increases. Tend to produce crisper overall images than FXAA, as they work during the rendering pipeline and are incorporated into the final rendered output. Do not work on post-rendering effects such as shaders and post-processing filters, which can lead to inconsistent images where geometry inside of a shader/PPF effect is jagged, while geometry outside is less so.

FXAA: Post-processing filter that analyzes the final rendered image and smooths edges. Very, very cheap as it's basically just another shader, tends to produce somewhat blurrier images overall than traditional AA. As it is the last post-processing effect applied, it works on other shader and post-processing filters as well, which leads to more consistent images than traditional AA.

Only you can decide which look appeals to you more, there is no objectively "best" method of anti-aliasing. Try them all out and see which results you like best.
#10wildog2006Posted 8/22/2014 7:04:34 AM
I gotta say, I fell in love with TXAA during Assassin's Creed 4. It just looks sooooo good
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