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do you still look at system requirements?

#31__starsnostarsPosted 8/24/2014 4:05:24 PM
Not since the 90s.
#32arleasPosted 8/24/2014 4:05:41 PM
I look but not because I'm worried I can't run it. I'm just curious what they list as the minimum and max...especially on older games. "Wow I could have run this on my toaster oven!"
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#33WarGreymon77Posted 8/24/2014 4:26:07 PM
Yes, I do. I do not like the newer versions of Windows, and have no intention of buying a new computer. My video card kicks ass, but my CPU and RAM are bound to be showing their age.

ATI Radeon HD 6950 (I think it's the 50, not sure)
Intel Core 2 Quad 6600 @ 2.4 Ghz
3 GB RAM
Windows Vista (Windows Classic visual style + classic Start menu + classic folders)
#34kobalobasileusPosted 8/24/2014 4:39:10 PM
JKatarn posted...
kobalobasileus posted...
Allmattered posted...
Is there a need to? All System requirements in games these days are made up crap. Publishers just paste higher system reqs on their game each time to give the silly illusion that it looks better and improved *looks at COD.
Trust me, I've played plenty of modern games on my ancient PC to realize how much of BS system requirements are.


I'm pretty sure system requirements have ALWAYS been made up crap. It always drove me nuts when I'd buy a DOS game back in the day, read the system requirements of 4MB RAM, install it on my very expensive PC with 12MB RAM, and never get to play it because "not enough memory."


Why would they make them up? Why exclude potential consumers by lying about minimum requirements if they could list lower specs and expand their customer base? Also, that DOS situation was probably related to the allocation of conventional memory and had little to do with the "extended" 12MB of RAM in the machine. Probably needed to load DOS high.


The problem was whether a game wanted EMS or XMS. I was a tech illiterate kid at the time living with a "don't touch it you'll break it" father, so I was essentially screwed. The PC had one boot configuration. Períod.

Knowing tech as I do now, I can't help but wonder why those DOS devs didn't just bundle the executable with a batch script to set the right type of extra RAM on launch.