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Save State PC

#11SinisterSlayPosted 8/29/2014 11:37:59 AM(edited)
I guess you could hibernate your computer in the middle of the game.

DarkZV2Beta posted...
128kb+64kb+65kb+more -> 19kb isn't really a matter of Snes9x being accurate or inaccurate. It's a matter of the fact that you don't need to save all of the information, and much of what you do need to save is redundant and can be quickly and easily compressed.

It's not really feasible for obvious reasons, but it's not impossible.



Even a very basic compression could cover that as well.

Even a really simple:
00000000000000000000000000000001000
=
0#32,1,0#3

Something as basic as that is more than 50% compression in my example.
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He who stumbles around in darkness with a stick is blind. But he who... sticks out in darkness... is... fluorescent! - Brother Silence
#12DiviDudePosted 8/29/2014 11:54:01 AM(edited)
You can totally do this if you choose to run Windows in a virtual machine. Granted, it will take a few minutes to save and load each time, and the virtual machine will suffer performance-wise.

But yeah, just bring back quicksave you f***ing ***hole devs.
#13LvthnPosted 8/29/2014 12:04:03 PM
KaiserWarrior posted...
Compression can cut the size down, yes. There's also the fact that SNES9x isn't exactly the most accurate of emulators out there; BSNES would probably be a better comparison. Still, the point is about the scale of things; saving the state of a modern PC isn't in the same league as saving the state of a 25-year-old console.


AFAIK, emulation accuracy doesn't affect this. I know that some very early emulators did not save the RNG state and would thus bug out some games, but I think even ZSNES saves the RNG.

SNES9x isn't THAT bad. If your CPU can't handle BSNES/higan it's recommended. It is, at the least, not ZSNES.
#14psyduck151Posted 8/29/2014 12:13:13 PM
Lvthn posted...
KaiserWarrior posted...
Compression can cut the size down, yes. There's also the fact that SNES9x isn't exactly the most accurate of emulators out there; BSNES would probably be a better comparison. Still, the point is about the scale of things; saving the state of a modern PC isn't in the same league as saving the state of a 25-year-old console.


AFAIK, emulation accuracy doesn't affect this. I know that some very early emulators did not save the RNG state and would thus bug out some games, but I think even ZSNES saves the RNG.

SNES9x isn't THAT bad. If your CPU can't handle BSNES/higan it's recommended. It is, at the least, not ZSNES.


whats wrong with zsnes?
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We Do Not Sow
#15LvthnPosted 8/29/2014 12:56:28 PM
psyduck151 posted...
Lvthn posted...
KaiserWarrior posted...
Compression can cut the size down, yes. There's also the fact that SNES9x isn't exactly the most accurate of emulators out there; BSNES would probably be a better comparison. Still, the point is about the scale of things; saving the state of a modern PC isn't in the same league as saving the state of a 25-year-old console.


AFAIK, emulation accuracy doesn't affect this. I know that some very early emulators did not save the RNG state and would thus bug out some games, but I think even ZSNES saves the RNG.

SNES9x isn't THAT bad. If your CPU can't handle BSNES/higan it's recommended. It is, at the least, not ZSNES.


whats wrong with zsnes?


Lots of things. But if you want some serious examples from popular games:

- Star Fox runs at the incorrect speed. Music even desyncs because of this. It's not a small difference, either, anyone who has played the original will immediately wonder wtf is wrong with it.
- Star Ocean cannot be run correctly.
- Speedy Gonzalez has a fatal error, near the end no less.
- Numerous games (too many to count) require background transparency forcing, which you must toggle on and off, just to navigate maps. Obviously this changes how things look and is also a ridiculous pain in the ass.

And this is just the stuff off the top of my head that's so serious it makes some games unplayable. Very few games actually run properly and any niche games likely barely run right at all. There are countless other cases of music/sound glitches, graphical errors and screwups, etc. Sadly some schmucks have even started blaming the GAMES for these bugs. You know how many people claim Star Ocean is a crashy game? Surprise - on a cart or an accurate emulator, it's not!

The problem with ZSNES is that it's high-level emulation meant for computers of 15+ years ago. High level emulation means it doesn't actually mimic what an SNES does, it just jury-rigs an environment to run the game. You'll notice from old ZSNES patch notes, if you actually wanted to look at that, that many updates were just "hacks" to enable certain games. Hint - an actual SNES doesn't need hacks to run native games. Neither do low-level, accurate emulators, because they correctly reproduce the environment to run the games.
#16mrCubePosted 8/29/2014 1:01:27 PM
It's possible and feasible. I mean you can save a snapshot of a running VM to your disk in a matter of seconds. There's no reason that I can think of for why this wouldn't apply to any other program.
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#17jake-sfPosted 8/29/2014 1:04:19 PM
Star Fox has been fixed for a long time in ZSnes...
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http://sfjake.zxq.net/
#18SinisterSlayPosted 8/29/2014 1:05:14 PM
I liked the buggy high frame rate version of star fox, it was much easier to play.

Still, snes9x is and has always been better than zsnes.
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He who stumbles around in darkness with a stick is blind. But he who... sticks out in darkness... is... fluorescent! - Brother Silence
#19SetzeraPosted 8/29/2014 1:08:08 PM
I think auto-saves replaced the need for a quick save button, but, not all auto-saves are created equal. A save dump would probably be the best thing they could try, though it may just cause a crashmania in some games.
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#20ForeverZero2Posted 8/29/2014 1:52:36 PM
i've used a devil may cry 4 trainer that had a save state feature