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Why would you buy full priced games for $59.99?

#61JKSonicPosted 12/17/2012 8:43:14 AM
Just to be clear, SOME games were $70+-ish...SOME. Also depending on where you lived in the US game prices would differ. In fact sometimes they would different $10+ at different stores. Right in the same mall, side-by-side, we had two stores (Gamestop....which was at the time whatever it was before...either Gamestop.com or EB Games, can't remember) and another store that sold games, systems, movies, music, etc (can't remember the name)... Anyway at the other store games were always about $10 cheaper, sometimes more, and these were for brand new games.
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#62randomweirdoPosted 12/17/2012 8:45:40 AM
Silent Sniper IV posted...
randomweirdo posted...
For example if you wanted to go buy Chrono Trigger when it came out, enjoy that $80 price tag and it sure didn't drop very much within a month. If anything, the games became harder to find the longer they were out.


Are you acounting for inflation or something? CT was $60 on release where i lived. I remember that really specifically because I worked my ass off saving up for it before it came out. The only games I trecall being above $60 offhand were Earthbound and Phantasy star IV.


I'd love to know where you were shopping then, because I checked every store in my area and could not find CT for lower than $79.99. I remember that one very well because of how hard I looked to try and find it for less and how hard I worked to make sure I had the money when it came out. And no, not accounting for inflation at all. That price was the price I paid back then, adjusting for inflation it would likely be over $100 now.

And Phantasy Star IV was another good example. That one had a MSRP of $99.99. At best you might find it for $80, I remember I had to shop around to find it for $80, then trade in a few games to bring it down to $60. I was so happy when the PS1 came out and I could actually buy 2 games for the normal $70 to $80 I was used to paying for one.
#63MegagutsPosted 12/17/2012 8:46:38 AM
Because I have a job
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#64secondhand1Posted 12/17/2012 8:48:15 AM
ILikesCheese posted...
I really grow tired of the "I support the developer" argument in threads of this nature.


Yeah, it's almost as tiresome as the arguments that attempt to place value on a game as if it applies across the board.

ILikesCheese posted...
At what point do you folks NOT support the developer anymore? If games rose to $70? $80?? $100??? Just because you like a game and the company that makes it is not a good enough reason to continue to purchase products at overly inflated prices.

$60 is just too expensive of a price in the marketplace for 90% of the games offered. This has nothing to do with personal wealth. I love Dishonored to death, and I bought it brand new. But after finishing the game in 10 hours, not wishing to do a second playthrough, and there being no online component to continue playing, I regret my purchase. Don't get me wrong, the game is great. It's just not worth the $60 pricetag for the amount of gameplay on offer.

This is why I am SOOOO glad the secondary market exists and serivces like Gamefly are available. If (when) we see a move to complete DD or a lockout of used games, we will also see an implosion of the gaming market similar in scope to 1984 unless prices are not so ridiculously high.


Oops.
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#65kidwgmPosted 12/17/2012 8:49:29 AM
Because I'm an adult with a full time job and can do whatever the hell I want with my money.
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#66takidigits2005Posted 12/17/2012 8:50:52 AM
"Why would you buy full priced games for $59.99?"

I have disposable income and I believe in supporting game developers. That's why.
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#67Silent Sniper IVPosted 12/17/2012 8:56:23 AM(edited)
darealest47 posted...


Get a job.


Got one, thanks. That's why I don't buy tons of $60 games I won't have time to play constantly on week one!

Re: Chrono trigger, I found this, and the comments section has people saying they payed anywhere from $54 to $85 for it, so maybe it was a regional thing. Who knows. I got mine at a K-mart outside of Atlanta. I'm kind of surprised I remember that more than 15 years later. http://www.1up.com/news/90s-game-price-comparison-charticle
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#68TheBlueStigPosted 12/17/2012 8:59:51 AM
kesah posted...
ILikesCheese posted...
B) Games were never $70 to $80. At least not in the US for a major console. In fact, the further you go back in time, the cheaper they were. Without adjusting for inflation of course.



http://i.imgur.com/zf92o.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/hQGu1.jpg

Toys R Us ad from 1996.

Entire ad can be viewed here: http://www.neogaf.com/forum/showthread.php?t=504415


Don't forget NeoGeo games that started at $110 and went up to $250 each.
#69_OujiDoza_Posted 12/17/2012 9:03:00 AM
I bought Pokemon Stadium for N64 brand new for some silly amount when it came out, but I've never paid that much for a game since, unless it was a limited edition or something.

I try to save a bit when I can, don't care if I make enough money to buy at full price, every little bit counts.
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#70SheepinatorPosted 12/17/2012 9:09:36 AM
TheBlueStig posted...
pcmasterking7 posted...
Depends on the developer.

This makes no sense at all considering the fact that the developer gets paid as soon as their game gets bought by a retailer.

Retailers do NOT pay developers after the sale of a game, that never happens anywhere.

That isn't entirely accurate. Publishers book revenue when games are shipped to retail, but they leave out around 10% which they call "reserves". This is to account for price reductions based on historical trends of what they have already shipped. Games never come back to the publisher but they do help retailers to move the inventory. If a game sells really poorly they can take an earnings hit if they have to boost those reserves to help the inventory sell.

Publishers also use market development funds which are to aid with promotions such as buying better placement in the store, buying space in the store ads, etc. At the end of the day, the publisher wants a good relationship with the retailers because they want those same retailers to buy millions of units of the next game they say will be huge.

tldr: when you see a discount at a store, you can't assume that 100% of that discount is being eaten by the retailer.
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