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Would you support a console that offered strictly digital downloads IF...

#71LethalbuttersPosted 1/30/2013 5:35:00 PM
I want physical copies. I just think its easier to keep them safe and if anything happens to my Xbox or account I don't need to rebuy games. Lastly I don't want to download every game because it'll take forever and if I run out of memory ill have to delete a game and what if I wanna play it later.
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It won't budge.
#72DrFeelgood1984Posted 1/30/2013 5:42:20 PM
I would not support it because it would eliminate millions of jobs. People work in factories that produce the discs and game cases, people work in the warehouses that store the games, people drive the trucks from the warehouses to electronic retailers, and people work in the electronic stores that sell the games. I'll don't mind paying a little more so people can make an honest living.
#73zyxomma100Posted 1/31/2013 1:36:04 AM
From: Sheepinator | #065
I'm not sure about your points about public domain and DRM. What is the timeline on that, 50 years after the death of the last creator? I can't say that's high on my list of priorities thinking about my digital purchase today.

You may not care, but it is my absolute highest priority when considering digital media. I guess it might make more sense if I say I hold out some hope that one day that current patent and copyright law will be reformed and the absolutely insane time frames reduced. Also, keep in mind that I'm not talking about just myself. I'm talking about the preservation of art for society in the future.
It isn't entirely true to say that they stop working when the infrastructure dies.

True, but you also seem to focus on the HDD. Once the infrastructure goes down and the CONSOLE dies, you're out of luck.

Besides, that's only part of the argument. Most of my concern lies with allowing NEW people to experience media, which becomes much, much harder.
From: Sheepinator | #068
Also on public domain, if the concern is that we won't be able to get the games because the infrastructure has gone, I'd say we can easily get seemingly every arcade game, Spectrum, NES/SNES etc.

All of your examples were physical copies. None of my points carry over to physical copies, and this thread doesn't concern them anyway. Yes, arcade cabinets are physical copies. Big and unwieldy, but still.

The release of physical copies into the world fulfills the media creator's obligation to allow the work to enter the public domain. If society can't keep at least one copy of the work, well, that's society's fault should the creator die/disband/whatever and the work becomes lost.

If the only distribution method is DRM-locked digital, then if the infrastructure goes down without any further action by the creator, then the creator has not fulfilled that obligation. Sure, it's not to the letter of the law illegal (in the US), but the only reason for that is because as I said before, the laws are way behind the times.

As far as I know, Steam is the only DRM service that has even acknowledged this issue, with Gabe Newell going on record as saying that if Steam were to die, he would make sure an effort was put in to DRM-unlock all games before service shutdown. It's hardly a guarantee (and I don't see Steam dying anytime soon anyway), but it's more than the complete silence by pretty much everyone else.
#74SheepinatorPosted 1/31/2013 7:59:42 AM
zyxomma100 posted...
From: Sheepinator | #068
Also on public domain, if the concern is that we won't be able to get the games because the infrastructure has gone, I'd say we can easily get seemingly every arcade game, Spectrum, NES/SNES etc.

All of your examples were physical copies. None of my points carry over to physical copies, and this thread doesn't concern them anyway. Yes, arcade cabinets are physical copies. Big and unwieldy, but still.

And my point was all those digital copies reside on physical systems, via HDD, flash memory, USB, and on phsyical devices. If we can retain the software from decades old bashed up arcade machines that sold a few thousand units, I'm confident we can retain the software of current XBLA games etc. that sell far more.

Gabe Newell going on record as saying that if Steam were to die, he would make sure an effort was put in to DRM-unlock all games before service shutdown. It's hardly a guarantee (and I don't see Steam dying anytime soon anyway), but it's more than the complete silence by pretty much everyone else.

I think we'll see a lot more of this type of thing in coming years, as well as the likes of id putting their source code on GPL etc. Companies are more aware and progressive on this issue now than 20-30 years ago. Plus as I said if there were demand to strip DRM from old games in the future, there would be a business model for it. Hackers can strip that stuff in hours or days now, I don't think it'll be an insurmountable problem in the future.
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My mad face and my happy face are the same.
#75Nirvanas_NoxPosted 1/31/2013 12:25:11 PM
shawnmck posted...
The fact remains that a vast majority of gamers want physical copies.
Why would anyone force DD onto them then ?
Just because you want it ISN'T a legitimate reason.

Keep it optional.
When the day comes that a vast majority of gamers favor Digital Distribution, then & only then do you make the move to DD only.
Until then, you keep it OPTIONAL.

What is the problem ?

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My business isnt your business so unless you're my thong, dont be up my ass.