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Getting new TV, 780 or 1080? 1080 that more noticeable?

#1tyrannosauryogiPosted 2/3/2013 12:54:49 PM
I've been using a 32" 720 TV for a few years now and looking to upgrade the size (47" I think) for a new condo I am moving into. If I go for a 1080p option is it very much a visual upgrade that I would notice?

Thanks for any information.
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Love fighters! Find me playing P4A, SF4, BBEX, SFxT......XBL name: CuteYogaGirls
#2weapon_d00d816Posted 2/3/2013 1:00:41 PM(edited)
If you're like me and you've been playing on a 720p for years, you'll definitely notice a difference. Plus, it's an investment. More and more things will be optimized for 1080p in the coming years.

Oh, one more thing. If you're getting a bigger tv, you'll DEFINITELY need a higher resolution. I have a 54'' 720p and it was a pretty bad decision. The large size of the TV requires larger pixels (I think I'm right, but not sure).
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#3Super CreaturesPosted 2/3/2013 1:04:22 PM
With that size, it is very much noticeable.

On something small, like a 32" TV or smaller, depending on distance, it really isn't noticeable, but on a larger display, it is.

And you'll definitely notice a different jumping from a 32" 720p TV to a 47" 1080p TV.

I have a 27" 720p TV, and when I go over to my friend's and play on his 1080p 50" TV, I notice a big difference.

Also, due to the fact that your 720p TV isn't actually a 720p display (it is a 1366x768 display, not a 1280x720 display), unless you are using a VGA or HDMI connection, with the resolution set to 1366x768, you are going to notice even more of a difference, especially if your TV has overscan issues with a 720p image over component.
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#4tyrannosauryogi(Topic Creator)Posted 2/3/2013 1:10:38 PM
Okay very cool. Thanks for the feedback. I haven't looked at TVs in a very long time and excited to upgrade and want to make sure I make a good decision!

One last thing....for my budget, I can get a bit of a bigger LG (the 47") with 1080 than I can a Samsung (40" I think for similar cost). My 32" 720 is a samsung. Is there any big difference here? Based on some limited research I understand they're pretty comparable brands.
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Love fighters! Find me playing P4A, SF4, BBEX, SFxT......XBL name: CuteYogaGirls
#5NakedSnake1986Posted 2/3/2013 6:33:04 PM
I can tell you that you will not find any tv over 32" that's not 1080p today. Maybe a few years ago they did 720p in sets over 32" but now 1080 is the standard.

Samsung is the best imho but LG, Sony and sharp are all quality. Vizio is good for a budget price but doesn't have the bells and whistles the other brands have. Any other brand not listed is Chinese off brand garbage.
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#6AmazingDanyPosted 2/3/2013 7:10:15 PM
From Consumer Reports:

Whether you're a Nintendo Wii U, Microsoft Xbox 360, or Sony PlayStation 3 fan, here are some suggestions that can help you buy the best TV for playing games.

Which TV technology should I consider? For gaming, a plasma TV generally will outperform an LCD. Plasma sets tend to have deeper black levels (which make for better contrast), and they don't have the motion blur and limited viewing angle associated with LCD sets.

A potential downside, though, is that many plasma sets suffer from image retention: When images are displayed onscreen for extended periods, say a few hours, they can temporarily leave behind a faint imprint. For most TV content, this isn't much of a problem. But many games use static images—health bars, head-up displays, and onscreen radars, for example—so image retention can be an issue. Newer plasma TVs do a decent job of minimizing this problem, but if it does occur, it may take some time to get rid of the persistent image.

So for this reason, I would recommend buying an LCD TV with an LED backlight. If the TV is mainly used for gaming, the viewing angle shouldn't be too much of a stopper, as most gamers will be close to the center of the screen. It'll matter only when you're playing with a group of friends around the TV.

What should I look for in an LCD, then? Some features can minimize some of the issues discussed above and enhance your gaming experience.

Refresh rate: Different TV brands call this feature different names; it basically reduces the blurring effects associated with motion. But since it's adding processing to the image, it can also increase motion lag. If you play casually or watch movies and shows on the same TV, I'd recommend a TV with at least a 120Hz refresh rate.

Local dimming: This feature, which can also go by different names, dims the LED backlight on darker areas of the screen. When this feature is working well, you won't really notice that it's doing anything at all. You'll simply have an image with deeper black levels while maintaining the brighter parts of the image as well.

Game mode: Some TVs have a game mode that reduces input lag (which means there's less time between pressing a button and the action appearing on the screen ) by cutting out some form of processing. I haven't tried this feature on every TV, but when I have tried it, the overall quality of the picture was reduced—and for me, it isn't worth the trade-off. You could actually reduce the lag time without using Game mode by turning off some of the features that unnecessarily affect picture quality, such as digital noise reduction and edge enhancement.

If you do purchase a TV that has a game mode, try it out and see if the reduced lag time is more beneficial to you than the change in picture quality.

How big should I go? If you're a competitive player, you may want to get a set with a smaller screen: You'll be able to react faster, because you won't be looking around a large screen. And typically, smaller screens have less input lag.

I personally prefer a bigger screen, though; it helps to enjoy the visuals. So if you play casually or use the same TV for gaming and watching movies, I'd recommend at least a 50-inch screen.

What about 3D? This is completely optional, but 3D can enhance your gaming experience. When you're playing platform games, for example, 3D makes it slightly easier to determine the distance of a gap you're trying to cross.

Some 3D TVs also offer Dual Play, a feature you can use with a multiplayer game that is normally shown in split screen, and make it appear as a full-screen game to each player wearing the requisite 3D glasses. Resolution is reduced, though, and not all games will support this feature. Also, bear in mind that you should take frequent breaks from playing video games to relieve strain on the eyes—and this is even more important when you're viewing 3D.

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Also buy as big as you can afford, 1080p and 3D.
#7secondhand1Posted 2/3/2013 7:28:40 PM
NakedSnake1986 posted...
I can tell you that you will not find any tv over 32" that's not 1080p today. Maybe a few years ago they did 720p in sets over 32" but now 1080 is the standard.


Samsung PN43E450

NakedSnake1986 posted...
Samsung is the best imho but LG, Sony and sharp are all quality. Vizio is good for a budget price but doesn't have the bells and whistles the other brands have. Any other brand not listed is Chinese off brand garbage.


What the what?!? Stop posting.
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The inherent idiocy of youth often outweighs its many advantages.
#8secondhand1Posted 2/3/2013 7:35:35 PM
AmazingDany posted...
From Consumer Reports:
Refresh rate: Different TV brands call this feature different names; it basically reduces the blurring effects associated with motion. But since it's adding processing to the image, it can also increase motion lag. If you play casually or watch movies and shows on the same TV, I'd recommend a TV with at least a 120Hz refresh rate.

Local dimming: This feature, which can also go by different names



Fantastic. As usual, your posts are a complete waste of time. Are these two nuggets from you or your dearly beloved Consumer Reports?
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The inherent idiocy of youth often outweighs its many advantages.
#9skiguy1981Posted 2/3/2013 7:39:27 PM
NakedSnake1986 posted...
I can tell you that you will not find any tv over 32" that's not 1080p today. Maybe a few years ago they did 720p in sets over 32" but now 1080 is the standard.

Samsung is the best imho but LG, Sony and sharp are all quality. Vizio is good for a budget price but doesn't have the bells and whistles the other brands have. Any other brand not listed is Chinese off brand garbage.


there is this really small company named PANASONIC...
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#10AmazingDanyPosted 2/3/2013 7:52:57 PM(edited)
secondhand1 posted...
AmazingDany posted...
From Consumer Reports:
Refresh rate: Different TV brands call this feature different names; it basically reduces the blurring effects associated with motion. But since it's adding processing to the image, it can also increase motion lag. If you play casually or watch movies and shows on the same TV, I'd recommend a TV with at least a 120Hz refresh rate.

Local dimming: This feature, which can also go by different names



Fantastic. As usual, your posts are a complete waste of time. Are these two nuggets from you or your dearly beloved Consumer Reports?



Ha ha, pisses you off, right? Man, what big baby.

I'd rather help the average gamer here get good buying tips than have them listen to you.

Who made you the go-to person for electronics, anyway? Oh yeah, nobody.

Go play in the traffic or something.