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How does a game sell 1+ million in three months and be a failure in sales?

#31Res5Posted 2/17/2013 9:56:32 PM
Reason number one low-budget, well-built, high concept games are the best way to go.
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#32Hucast9Posted 2/17/2013 9:58:33 PM
My guess is that Darksiders 2 must've been very expensive to produce if 1.5 million in sales is not enough. That sounds like a successful amount of sales to me.
#33Halochief6Posted 2/17/2013 10:02:49 PM
CaseyJonez posted...
What's the break down per item? $12 to the retailer, $12 in M$ royalties, $36 to the publisher, and $10 to the devs???.


Am I the only one bothered by the fact that this adds up to $70?
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#34AkaimizuPosted 2/17/2013 10:09:54 PM
Res5 posted...
Reason number one low-budget, well-built, high concept games are the best way to go.


Very true. But it also is what poses the big shakeup of this current industry. Why the Indie devs are starting to really influence the market in a way that threatens the big corporate game companies and their attempts to maintain the status quo of increasing game budgets.
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#35SheepinatorPosted 2/17/2013 11:21:44 PM
Akaimizu posted...
the big corporate game companies and their attempts to maintain the status quo of increasing game budgets.

Riiiight. Because companies love dismal performance stock prices and going bankrupt.
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#36AkaimizuPosted 2/17/2013 11:47:12 PM(edited)
Sheepinator posted...
Akaimizu posted...
the big corporate game companies and their attempts to maintain the status quo of increasing game budgets.

Riiiight. Because companies love dismal performance stock prices and going bankrupt.


Not really. You miss understand the point. I'm saying, it did cause a big stir in the market, and big companies are having a time trying to deal with it, given their current (This is today's AAA) standards. There's a lot of money put into big costs and AAA budgets than to taking risk with original ideas. So they get into a pattern of what felt like it was working. But now that is becoming a risk in itself, even trying to follow the plan they had. If they didn't think they should follow the increased budget path, in the first place, they wouldn't have continued to do so for years. But that's what they considered big business. It'll be like the movies.

This is, the market shifted before they realized it, or at least ready to handle it so quickly. More and more consumers are being attracted to the offerings of the growing indie community, which turns into small companies with big profits (for smaller investment), but can afford to do more original (lesser budget) stuff. The first inclination is to try to fight it a little, hoping that it would be a little easier than trying to change your large business model.

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#37SolisPosted 2/18/2013 12:02:49 AM
Excessive expectations and bloated budgets for both development and marketing, or simply mismanagement of funds. THQ seemed especially bad at all of the above, so this isn't much of a surprise.

The best example of this would be Frontlines/Homefront. Frontlines wasn't a huge success, but sold about half a million copies, and did well enough that the studio stayed open. Then THQ decides that their next game has to compete with Call of Duty, dumps a massive expectation on it and runs a huge advertising campaign for it, and shuffles the development team around to try and find someone that can pull a game out of it. And even though is sold 4 times better than their previous game in a shorter amount of time, the studio was still closed.

Then THQ tried to make the Udraw pad the next big thing, and promptly went bankrupt.
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#38NemerlightPosted 2/18/2013 2:37:40 AM
Halochief6 posted...
CaseyJonez posted...
What's the break down per item? $12 to the retailer, $12 in M$ royalties, $36 to the publisher, and $10 to the devs???.


Am I the only one bothered by the fact that this adds up to $70?


Maybe it cost more in some countries.
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#39mjc0961Posted 2/18/2013 3:01:06 AM
bluehat94 posted...
Because THQ expected it to sell 4-5 million, and needed it to sell 2 million to make back the money it cost to develop, advertise, etc. So it's a failure.

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#40DarkSymbiotePosted 2/18/2013 3:13:49 AM
CaseyJonez posted...
What's the break down per item? $12 to the retailer, $12 in M$ royalties, $36 to the publisher, and $10 to the devs???

It'll be awhile before I can wrap my head around how any one of the above can lose money from 1 000 000 sales in three months.


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