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What game IS worth $60 these days?

#31jorgestevensonPosted 3/20/2013 9:28:55 AM
For the 100,000,000th time, you can't just take the price of something 10 years ago, adjust it for inflation, and say that today's games are cheap because they cost less than that.

My $60 today buys me so many more things than it could buy in 1990. Look at all the stuff that is FREE today that used to cost thousands of dollars.

Wikipedia - I have an entire encyclopedia...for free.
Grooveshark - I have a ton of songs available to me at any time...for free.
Youtube - I can watch TV shows, music videos, tutorials, etc. at any time...for free.
Khan Academy - I can learn basically anything I could want...for free.
Skype - I can call any single person in the world...for free.

Is access to Wikipedia worth $1,000? No. But a complete encyclopedia in 1990 would probably cost upwards of $1,000 in 1990, adjusting for inflation. But if Wikipedia charged everybody $1,000 for access, nobody would buy it. Because it is not worth $1,000.

Similarly, videogames today are not worth their inflation-adjusted prices from 1990. Sure, low-information early-adopters might pay $60 for the vanilla version of a game, but most people either wait for a price drop or take advantage of pre-order bonuses, which have been getting increasingly lucrative. Look at Bioshock infinite - in exchange for a $60 pre-order on PC, Amazon is offering $30 in credit towards future games published by 2K games, as well as XCOM (for free), a book, and DLC content.

Games are not a good value at $60 today. You can cite historical prices all you want, but the price 10 years ago is irrelevant to the price today. It's a different world. Games are different. Consumers have more options.
#32WinternovaPosted 3/20/2013 9:34:08 AM
OrgeLambart posted...
ok so name one shady business practice you've been against in the past five years.


What the ignorant thinks is shady, the intelligent recognize as a smart business move. You can't impart your ill-informed subjective valuations on other people.
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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pMKUUUvjjzo
Fan of: Steelers(6-time Champions), Red Wings(11-time Champions)
#33SheepinatorPosted 3/20/2013 9:34:55 AM
OrgeLambart posted...
ok so name one shady business practice you've been against in the past five years. I'll bet you even found a way to justify that crap horse armor oblivion DLC, and the DLC hockers in Dragon's Age Origins.

"shady" suggests I was misled or cheated in some way. I can't think of any time I have ever bought a game or content for a game and didn't get what I expected. If what I expect isn't value to me, I choose not to buy it.
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My mad face and my happy face are the same.
#34Bud2003Posted 3/20/2013 9:36:05 AM
jorgestevenson posted...
For the 100,000,000th time, you can't just take the price of something 10 years ago, adjust it for inflation, and say that today's games are cheap because they cost less than that.

My $60 today buys me so many more things than it could buy in 1990. Look at all the stuff that is FREE today that used to cost thousands of dollars.

Wikipedia - I have an entire encyclopedia...for free.
Grooveshark - I have a ton of songs available to me at any time...for free.
Youtube - I can watch TV shows, music videos, tutorials, etc. at any time...for free.
Khan Academy - I can learn basically anything I could want...for free.
Skype - I can call any single person in the world...for free.

Is access to Wikipedia worth $1,000? No. But a complete encyclopedia in 1990 would probably cost upwards of $1,000 in 1990, adjusting for inflation. But if Wikipedia charged everybody $1,000 for access, nobody would buy it. Because it is not worth $1,000.

Similarly, videogames today are not worth their inflation-adjusted prices from 1990. Sure, low-information early-adopters might pay $60 for the vanilla version of a game, but most people either wait for a price drop or take advantage of pre-order bonuses, which have been getting increasingly lucrative. Look at Bioshock infinite - in exchange for a $60 pre-order on PC, Amazon is offering $30 in credit towards future games published by 2K games, as well as XCOM (for free), a book, and DLC content.

Games are not a good value at $60 today. You can cite historical prices all you want, but the price 10 years ago is irrelevant to the price today. It's a different world. Games are different. Consumers have more options.


Yes, because wikipedia is a great and credible research source.

AND ARE YOU KIDDING ME!!!!!! just because there are a few free things available now - you can't use that to diminish the effect of inflation.

Real credible research LexisNexis, MorningStar, etc....those cost a lot of money, because they are backed by empiracle data!!!

Grooveshark...you don't own that music!!!!!

Youtube...you don't own any videos on youtube, you just have access to it!

Khan Academy...do you think you going to apply for a job......

Oh why am I even responding to this idoicy..........
#35Bud2003Posted 3/20/2013 9:38:50 AM
jorgestevenson posted...
For the 100,000,000th time, you can't just take the price of something 10 years ago, adjust it for inflation, and say that today's games are cheap because they cost less than that.

My $60 today buys me so many more things than it could buy in 1990. Look at all the stuff that is FREE today that used to cost thousands of dollars.

Wikipedia - I have an entire encyclopedia...for free.
Grooveshark - I have a ton of songs available to me at any time...for free.
Youtube - I can watch TV shows, music videos, tutorials, etc. at any time...for free.
Khan Academy - I can learn basically anything I could want...for free.
Skype - I can call any single person in the world...for free.

Is access to Wikipedia worth $1,000? No. But a complete encyclopedia in 1990 would probably cost upwards of $1,000 in 1990, adjusting for inflation. But if Wikipedia charged everybody $1,000 for access, nobody would buy it. Because it is not worth $1,000.

Similarly, videogames today are not worth their inflation-adjusted prices from 1990. Sure, low-information early-adopters might pay $60 for the vanilla version of a game, but most people either wait for a price drop or take advantage of pre-order bonuses, which have been getting increasingly lucrative. Look at Bioshock infinite - in exchange for a $60 pre-order on PC, Amazon is offering $30 in credit towards future games published by 2K games, as well as XCOM (for free), a book, and DLC content.

Games are not a good value at $60 today. You can cite historical prices all you want, but the price 10 years ago is irrelevant to the price today. It's a different world. Games are different. Consumers have more options.


Go back in time, and go to the grocery store, and see what $60 will get you....now come back to the future, go to the grocery store and again see how far down that grocery list $60 will get you. That is inflation!!!!
#36WinternovaPosted 3/20/2013 9:44:07 AM
jorgestevenson posted...
For the 100,000,000th time, you can't just take the price of something 10 years ago, adjust it for inflation, and say that today's games are cheap because they cost less than that.


And why not? Just because there are other options doesn't mean that you can't take the standard retail releases for consoles in the past and compare them to the standard releases today. It's an appropriate comparison.

For example, in 1982, Pitfall! was released for the Atari 2600 for $29.95. That's equivalent to $72.06 today. Pitfall! was programmed by one man, David Crane, in about 1000 hours and fit onto a 4 kilobyte cartridge. Compare that to today's development teams, budgets and game media sizes...a 6GB DVD-ROM could hold 1,572,864 copies of the entire Pitfall! game.

You're getting a lot more for the same amount of money than I was when I first started gaming!
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Fan of: Steelers(6-time Champions), Red Wings(11-time Champions)
#37SheepinatorPosted 3/20/2013 9:45:14 AM
jorgestevenson posted...
My $60 today buys me so many more things than it could buy in 1990. Look at all the stuff that is FREE today that used to cost thousands of dollars.

Wikipedia - I have an entire encyclopedia...for free.
Grooveshark - I have a ton of songs available to me at any time...for free.
Youtube - I can watch TV shows, music videos, tutorials, etc. at any time...for free.
Khan Academy - I can learn basically anything I could want...for free.
Skype - I can call any single person in the world...for free.

Games are not a good value at $60 today.

If you want games made by Joe Public for free, go for it. I prefer games made by professionals, thanks.

And if YouTube is free, why do I have to watch an ad most times I open it? Also cinema ticket prices have almost doubled since PS1 launched.
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My mad face and my happy face are the same.
#38nothingbeastPosted 3/20/2013 9:48:58 AM
Sheepinator posted...
And if YouTube is free, why do I have to watch an ad most times I open it? Also cinema ticket prices have almost doubled since PS1 launched.


Not to mention the monthly internet bill I have to pay before I even consider accessing all that "free" content.
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~I was stomping goombas and saving princesses long before most of you were born.
#39BcowmanPosted 3/20/2013 9:49:02 AM
Bud2003 posted...
That is inflation!!!!


Bud is demonstrating the serious problem of exclamation mark inflation. Back in the old days, we could use just one. Now, each sentence needs three or four to covey the same level of exclamation.
#40nothingbeastPosted 3/20/2013 9:54:04 AM
Bcowman posted...
Bud2003 posted...
That is inflation!!!!


Bud is demonstrating the serious problem of exclamation mark inflation. Back in the old days, we could use just one. Now, each sentence needs three or four to covey the same level of exclamation.


That's not inflation. That's punctuation abuse.

When one exclamation point got you through the day, that was fine. But now we're taking several just to get the same effect.

Don't even get me started on my semicolon issues. Now that was a vicious monkey on my back.
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~I was stomping goombas and saving princesses long before most of you were born.