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When did game development get so sloppy?

#11qamefaqsPosted 10/30/2013 7:02:21 AM
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#12qamefaqsPosted 10/30/2013 7:16:09 AM
Gamerguymass posted...
This generation pretty much. Since online is the big thing now developers basically half ass their programming and bug testing to shove the game out the door and then fix it after. A big part of this is so they can then release the DLC that they took out of the original game and charge 10-15 dollars for that extra four to five hours of content. The fact that even years later all this DLC is the same price as when it first came out shows how greedy they are. Pretty pathetic when a game is 20 dollars or less brand new and yet the DLC for it is 30-50 dollars still.


This

AWarAmp84 posted...
The moment developers realized that were able to fix a game after its release is the moment they got sloppy. Gamers have become game testers.


And this (and the other reasons that have been stated already).

The paying public has essentially become an extension of the open beta for the games, only now it's post release instead of pre-release. We're open beta 2.0, basically.

It was inevitable that this would happen, though. Online patching/ DLC is simply too easy to take advantage of in that way.

As many companies as there are out there that may try to be a lot more ethical and strict with their testing standards by delaying release dates to ensure their product is rock-solid before it gets to us and who try to use post-release patching only when it comes to remedying issues which they didn't catch before hand- on a general level, that's just not how things work.

Most players in the industry (especially the big ones) simply can't resist exploiting the 'Release First - Fix Later' opportunity that an internet based business model/ infrastructure affords these days. They've got too much money riding on a set-in-stone release date when it comes to their marketing costs and all of the store/ shipment commitments and logistical issues, etc.
#13foodeater4Posted 10/30/2013 8:29:07 AM
Well, I'll give you batman, I haven't played it yet, but if it has issues it has issues.

As an MMO player since around 1999, basically every game that's been online has been a clusterbang. Very few games have launched smoothly. So I'll give GTAO a pass since its rockstars firs major online game.

Ass Creed, well that is very annoying when crap like that happens, but again, server always get killed on launch day, once all the initial hoopla is over theres never an issue.

And games have always been buggy. Theres tons of ways to glitch old arcade and Atari games usally by getting high scores certain ways. Also I've had tons of nes and snes games just freeze randomly on me also over the years then your screwed and prolly gotta start the whole game over instead of the last auto save. Buggy games are just more talked about these days due to the internet and a few crazy high profile buggy games like Skyrim PS3. But a lot of times many freezing issues can be fixed by using fresh saves and autosaves, but of course if a game that auto sasves auomatically like I think Batman does you might be out of luck where you can delete the old autosave in game like in Skyrim and have the game make a new one.
#14SunDevil77Posted 10/30/2013 8:46:40 AM
qamefaqs posted...
Most players in the industry (especially the big ones) simply can't resist exploiting the 'Release First - Fix Later' opportunity that an internet based business model/ infrastructure affords these days. They've got too much money riding on a set-in-stone release date when it comes to their marketing costs and all of the store/ shipment commitments and logistical issues, etc.


Thing is...I'd honestly take the "release now and fix later" tactic over what we used to have. For example, I recently replayed Indiana Jones and the Infernal Machine on N64. Had fun, experienced some crashing, but it still played...until the end. Gamebreaking glitch in the last 20 minutes.
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#15qamefaqsPosted 10/30/2013 9:32:58 AM
SunDevil77 posted...
qamefaqs posted...
Most players in the industry (especially the big ones) simply can't resist exploiting the 'Release First - Fix Later' opportunity that an internet based business model/ infrastructure affords these days. They've got too much money riding on a set-in-stone release date when it comes to their marketing costs and all of the store/ shipment commitments and logistical issues, etc.


Thing is...I'd honestly take the "release now and fix later" tactic over what we used to have. For example, I recently replayed Indiana Jones and the Infernal Machine on N64. Had fun, experienced some crashing, but it still played...until the end. Gamebreaking glitch in the last 20 minutes.


Oh yeah, I'd take it too. It's definitely something that can be seen as a big leap forward from a practical perspective, it's just what the industry has the option to do with it that can be (and usually is) a problem (for us as consumers).

It's a double edged sword, for sure - and at this point we have to accept the bad (inherent potential for basically irresistible profit based exploitation/ abuse with on-disk DLC, rushed releases, etc etc) with the good (genuine bug/ glitch patching and unplanned/ post-release DLC and related).

Like I said - it's all an inevitable part of businesses trying to keep up with and stay on top of technological advancement. There will always be people getting screwed along the way (on both sides - producers and consumers).
#16vigorm0rtisPosted 10/30/2013 9:48:32 AM
SunDevil77 posted...


Thing is...I'd honestly take the "release now and fix later" tactic over what we used to have.


Agreed. I remember how many games I played that I've never been able to finish because they were broken... usually toward the end. Jetset Willy II, one of the Norrath games last gen, Demon's Winter... probably dozens over the years.

Also, I have to assume players who think this is new are relatively young. Console games have been comparatively simple until this gen. PC games (for example, Daggerfall) have been coming out completely broken for decades because patches were available through available through the company. Frequently, those patches might take months or over a year to come out.
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#17TheBlueStigPosted 10/30/2013 10:15:05 AM
Game development got sloppy the microsecond that developers realized their customers were blithering fanboys that wouldn't complain enough to cost them money.
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#18vigorm0rtisPosted 10/30/2013 10:21:53 AM
TheBlueStig posted...
Game development got sloppy the microsecond that developers realized their customers were blithering fanboys that wouldn't complain enough to cost them money.


So... yeah, around the 2600.
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#19CKnightPosted 10/30/2013 10:26:55 AM
DLC prices not scaling is just stupid to me. I can understand not following the price trends of the used market but eventually all games officially drop to $30 and then $20 new. And the dlc prices should drop by the same percentage.
#20Merc123Posted 10/30/2013 1:47:48 PM
i'm not saying that companies don't skimp on testing games a bit (it probably happens) but you do realize that before a game releases there a many more bugs that gets fixed before the game releases. Its probably a really hard task to get all the bugs out of a game, especially in more open world games.
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