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ITT you educate a clueless gamer

#1PS3_MofoPosted 12/5/2012 11:34:00 AM
Explaining in your own words

What is/are

1. Hitboxes

2. anti aliasing

3. Jaggies

4. Framerate

5. What is the difference between CPU, GPU, and Ram. And what limitations does the low ram have on the PS3(like if it had higher ram, what would it be able to do, that it cant now)

6.The importance of "the cell" (PS3)

7. Textures/Texture popups

8. Polygon count

9. What is the "unreal engine". When I think of unreal, i always think of unreal tournament. And i obviously assume that both aren't related in any way?
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xbox360mofo: I'm a grown man who already knows Orojackson's ways and the fact that he's garbage. I'll beat the crap out of him and that's the end of that.
#2ramseanGoodbyePosted 12/5/2012 12:04:01 PM
PS3_Mofo posted...
Explaining in your own words

What is/are

1. Hitboxes - used to check if there's been a collision.

2. anti aliasing - technique used to hide jaggies, i think by blurring the lines a little bit(not 100%)

3. Jaggies - jagged edges you sometimes see on characters objects

4. Framerate - to do with how smooth a game runs( Its to with animation) 30 frames per second, would mean 30 static images a second) a jerky framerate ruins the illusion.

5. What is the difference between CPU, GPU, and Ram. And what limitations does the low ram have on the PS3(like if it had higher ram, what would it be able to do, that it cant now)
CPU generally handles the overall structure of the games, gpu handles graphics intensive stuff like shaders and particle effects. Ram is fast memory, the more ram the quicker stuff loads and the more processes you can do.

6.The importance of "the cell" (PS3)
dunno

7. Textures/Texture popups
textures are images wrapped around geometry. Texture popup is when you the geometry magically change in front of you, ruining the illusion.

8. Polygon count - how many triangles a piece of geometry is made up of. The more polygons, the more detailed an object can be.

9. What is the "unreal engine". When I think of unreal, i always think of unreal tournament. And i obviously assume that both aren't related in any way?
Unreal engine is a set of tools developers use to make a game, instead of making a game from scratch they use software to make the process easier
#3superlativeformPosted 12/5/2012 12:19:30 PM
Hitboxes - Used for collision detections, most useful in one way collisions like bullet impacts, basically invisible shapes

Anti aliasing - Used to smooth out edges on 3d shapes to reduce jagged appearance. It's sort of a way to create an increased resolution without actually increasing the resolution

Jaggies - The imperfections on 3d shapes, typically characterized by a discontinuity in shape like a sudden hard edge, think super mario 64 with the old mario model for an exaggerated example.

Framerate - this is the amount of frames/second the game plays at, the higher the framerate the smoother the game plays. Often drops in framerate are mislabeled "lag", because it creates a bumpy/jumpy feel. The difference is a limit in hardware capabilities vs lag which is caused by low bandwidth or poor connectivity in multiplayer settings.

CPU or central processing is where most of the calculations a system makes take place. It is involved in a lot physics like processes, AI, player input and a couple of graphic processes, this is like the "pre-processing" for game
GPU or graphics processing unit handles all post processing affects which include shadows, textures, Anti-Aliasing etc. Basically it handle the refinement, hence the term post processing
The RAM or random access memory provides a short term storage that your CPU can use as a "shortcut". It would take much longer to access from the hard drive than ram. Think of it when you load a level, all that info is moved into the ram for quicker access.

The cell is mostly unique in that it doesn't behave like a normal CPU. It prioritizes different things and is better at some things than others. Ultimately, it does what a CPU does and is subject to the same mechanics or pre-processing. It was initially regarded as a challenge to program for, because it was so different at the time.

Textures are a layer that details the surface of 3d models, think of it as paint on a wall. All the details of a machine or vegetation on a field are mostly textures. Texture Pop ins are a by-product of not being loaded before the rest of the game and when they do, they sort of pop in. I'm sure you've seen this before when you've first loaded an area and for a couple seconds it looked like the detail was flat or missing.

Polygon Count is a way of reducing a 3d model into little pieces that are typically triangles, thus polygon count is a misnomer. This a sort of way to estimate the detail or cost of rendering a character.

The unreal engine is a game engine. A game engine is like a developers tool box for making a game. It's a way of stream lining the process of coding, so someone doesn't have to sit there and manually type out code. The Unreal engine just happens to be a very commonly used engine for games. Usually game engines are associated with certain strengths and weaknesses. The unreal engine for instance has a common texture pop in issue (Not to say this applies to all).
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#4Video_Game_CzarPosted 12/5/2012 12:20:29 PM
www.google.com
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PSN: VideoGameCzar l XBL: VideoGameCzar l Steam: TheVideoGameCzar
#5mrhappyguy12345Posted 12/5/2012 12:38:34 PM
Video_Game_Czar posted...
www.google.com


Why post that after two people gave detailed, helpful answers? Sheesh. Some people.
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