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#21Spiroth_KweehhPosted 1/26/2013 6:57:25 PM
Eoin posted...
The PS3 OS reserves around 15% of the hard drive space. So with 37GB there's about 5.5GB reserved by the system. This means that a 40GB PS3 is only ever going to report 31GB free (out of 37GB).

Getting that to 30GB to install Infamous 2 is going to be challenging.

st1ll_x posted...
those 2 game datas I need so I can't delete them...

Just out of curiosity.....why? Game data is usually installation data (not saves), or patches/DLC. You can almost always get it back easily by either reinstalling the game, or redownloading patches/DLC. There's only a very few games that store actual save data in the game data files (LBP being the most popular I believe).



LBP and LBP2 used it but you can convert it to Save Data now, so it's ok.

MGS4 uses its Game Data for its ingame secret camera Collectibles.
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#22fireblade08Posted 1/26/2013 7:25:27 PM(edited)
I didn't receive a code on my home email, maybe it's over 40K? I then did the Like Us on Facebook ( http://www.facebook.com/SonyPlaystation/app_106681779474103 ) with my fake page I made a while ago & no code in yet on Gmail.
I don't like that the code they sent out earlier by email to everybody had no expiry date but they're always over. I also should have beta tested Dust 514 properly for they ran special promotions on it. I knew something was up when nearly everyone on the blog is suddenly in Plus =)
#23morphinapgPosted 1/26/2013 9:34:18 PM
From: Eoin | #018
The PS3 OS reserves around 15% of the hard drive space.

That can't be accurate. The OS would be a constant size. I think you may be thinking of the difference between the listed HDD size, and the actual HDD space. Manufacturer's would call it a 40 GB HDD, but you'll only see 37 GB available because it's technically not really 40 GB. It's 40,000,000,000 bytes, which comes out to 37.25 GB because 1 GB = 1024^3 bytes = 1,073,741,824 bytes. HDD manufacturer's treat 1 GB as 1000^3 bytes, but no operating systems actually use that, so the HDDs appear smaller in the OS. This is a perceived loss of about 6.9% of the reported size.

There would be no reason for the PS3's OS to take up different amounts of space for different HDDs.
#24st1ll_xPosted 1/26/2013 9:57:08 PM
Does this still work? Or is it limited to a certain number of people? Might want to let some friends know about this
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#25EoinPosted 1/27/2013 4:24:55 AM(edited)
morphinapg posted...
That can't be accurate.

It is.

morphinapg posted...
The OS would be a constant size.

Yes, the OS is a constant size. Please note what I actually said though. I didn't say "the OS takes up about 15% of the PS3's hard drive". I said "the OS reserves about 15% of the hard drive space". The OS, itself, doesn't use all that space. It grabs it anyway.

morphinapg posted...
I think you may be thinking of the difference between the listed HDD size, and the actual HDD space.

No, I'm not. 15%, of the space, reserved by the OS, no matter how big your hard drive is.

morphinapg posted...
Manufacturer's would call it a 40 GB HDD, but you'll only see 37 GB available because it's technically not really 40 GB. It's 40,000,000,000 bytes

The definition of a gigabyte really is a billion bytes though. This is how the IEEE and the IEC both define a gigabyte. Operating systems have a nasty habit of looking at things differently, which has caused a lot of confusion and caused many people (apparently including yourself) to believe this to be an advertising ploy instead of manufacturer's following the industry standards (which in many areas are in fact also legal standards).

morphinapg posted...
There would be no reason for the PS3's OS to take up different amounts of space for different HDDs.

It does anyway. Check any post about people asking where their hard drive space is gone. For posts about 500GB hard drives, they'll say that the PS3 has 410GB free, out of 465GB. The 500GB down to 465GB is because of the difference between OS and manufacturer gigabytes. The 465GB down to 410GB (notice that it's a much bigger drop) is because of the PS3 OS reserving space for itself.
#26PHEEliNUXPosted 1/27/2013 4:26:36 AM
Does it work for every EU account or just French? Also can i use it after my PS+ Expires(I used one that doesn't stack with the one from the site)
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#27Valnor50Posted 1/27/2013 4:43:09 AM
guten tag
#28morphinapgPosted 1/27/2013 3:48:59 PM(edited)
From: Eoin | #025
Yes, the OS is a constant size. Please note what I actually said though. I didn't say "the OS takes up about 15% of the PS3's hard drive". I said "the OS reserves about 15% of the hard drive space". The OS, itself, doesn't use all that space. It grabs it anyway.

Why?

No, I'm not. 15%, of the space, reserved by the OS, no matter how big your hard drive is.

Seems like a terrible waste

The definition of a gigabyte really is a billion bytes though. This is how the IEEE and the IEC both define a gigabyte. Operating systems have a nasty habit of looking at things differently, which has caused a lot of confusion and caused many people (apparently including yourself) to believe this to be an advertising ploy instead of manufacturer's following the industry standards (which in many areas are in fact also legal standards).

Yes I know. A "Gigabyte" (GB) = 1000^3 bytes. A "Gibibyte" (GiB) = 1024^3. But computers use GiB as their standards (they use the wrong symbol, calling them GB, but they mean GiB), so why not use the same standard for hard drive manufacturers to make things less confusing for consumers, and make advertised sizes seem more consistent with what you'll be getting?
#29EoinPosted 1/27/2013 5:06:15 PM
morphinapg posted...
Why?

Probably the library file. Hard to say for sure until someone cracks the PS3's encryption format (and since that hasn't happened yet, it's probably not something to expect to happen).

morphinapg posted...
why not use the same standard for hard drive manufacturers to make things less confusing for consumers, and make advertised sizes seem more consistent with what you'll be getting?

I'm not convinced that the confusion as a result of this is being experienced by consumers. I think most consumers get a 500GB hard drive, see that their computer says that it's actually thirty-something gigabytes less than this, and just think it's "formatting" and stop worrying about it there. The 2% of people that it does confuse go onto the internet and ask and mostly get the "evil manufacturers grr" explanation, which, although not particularly true, both sounds true and has the benefit of explaining the ~7% difference properly anyway.

Anyway, as why the same standard isn't used, well, who's going to change? The manufacturers, who are using correct (but somewhat unpopular) terminology? The OS creators, who need to be deeply concerned about consistency and backwards compatibility?

Eventually I suspect it'll be the OS side that changes, but it'll probably require far more widespread acceptance of "one billion bytes" as the meaning of the term "gigabyte". Right now that acceptance is not quite there, and although it's slowly growing, some people are very attached to the old meaning, sometimes emotionally so (I am unsure how, but I've seen it too many times to doubt it).