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Why do people say PC gaming is less expensive?

#1sumflipatyrdoorPosted 2/15/2013 12:57:31 PM
Posting this on other boards as well to get some other input.

I'm not trying to bash on PC gamers and i'm prolly gonna get a lot of trolls, but i just want to know how PC gaming is less expensive then console gaming. I already know that with a great PC you can get way better graphics than a console (PS3/360/WiiU) FACT.

Here's my knowledge of both a PC and a console:
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For the PC:
- Good gaming PC's run from $800-$2,000 (Can run graphic intensive games at mid - high settings)
- An average avid PC person replaces parts or whole desktops/Laptops in about 4-5 years (average for parts can be about $50 for ram - $200 for a graphics card)
- PC games run about $50 (or free for those people)
- PC games can't be sold to GS/Amazon/Bestbuy (so it has no trade in value)
- Gaming PC peripherals are expensive (keyboard, mice, headsets)

For the Console:
- Consoles cost about nowadays $250-300
- Console users don't really replace their consoles unless it bricks (which is rare unless you are talking about the old RRoD 360) and a console's lifespan can range from 4-7 years (depending on if it bricks or not)
- Console games run about $60 (or free for those people)
- Console games can be sold or you can buy used copies (to save money)
- Console peripherals are (which is debatable) cheaper than PC peripherals (depending on how much one splurges on PC peripheral, $90-150 for a gaming keyboard or $50-100 for a gaming mouse)

I know my info is bias to whether or not a PC gamer goes all out on parts/peripherals or not, but i just want to know your input on this matter.

Sidenotes:
- I already know people can OC their comps and make them more powerful so they can spend less money on parts, but in the process of OCing, they can greatly lower the lifespan of individual parts (depending on how well the OC was done)
- Also i know that a consoles life can vary from person to person. For me i have both the original 60gb PS3 and Halo 3 360 and both have lived till now. A consoles generation lasts about 8-10 years (look at ps2) AND even with the new Sony and MS consoles on the horizon, their last gen systems will still be bought and sold for prolly another 2ish years.
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GTX 660 TI // i7 3770k: 4.5 ghz // Z77A-GD65 // 16GB 2133mhz DDR3
#2Draconas_LyrrPosted 2/15/2013 12:58:59 PM
The biggest argument I see is the game expense. PC games are cheaper than console games, so the offset in price eventually makes up for the large price of the actual computer.
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PSN: Draconas_Lyrr
I'll never look at an apple the same way again..
#3sumflipatyrdoor(Topic Creator)Posted 2/15/2013 1:05:04 PM
Draconas_Lyrr posted...
The biggest argument I see is the game expense. PC games are cheaper than console games, so the offset in price eventually makes up for the large price of the actual computer.

But can't you say ps3/360 games are cheaper since although $10 more you can buy used versions (which can be cheaper depending on how it's been out) OR you can sell your old games you've beat for less money (but money nonetheless) whereas PC games you can't sell them (for the most part)
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GTX 660 TI // i7 3770k: 4.5 ghz // Z77A-GD65 // 16GB 2133mhz DDR3
#4ZetgobPosted 2/15/2013 1:08:32 PM
Besides just the initial price of games, don't forget the sales. Console sales just do not compare to some of the ones you see on digital games. Just look at some of the sales that were going on around Christmas. Between GMG, Steam, Amazon, GoG, and many more you could get a ton of games for a fraction of their normal price.

This really counters the whole used argument I think, as the amount of money you save is really night and day.
#5NeoSioTypePosted 2/15/2013 1:13:13 PM
I always thought a console as being the equivalent to a video card. Most somewhat modern PCs could potentially play graphic intensive PC games but they lack the card.

Or is this the wrong thought process?
#6theshovellerPosted 2/15/2013 1:13:58 PM
Alright, here's my take on it.

PC:

-$800 - $2000 sounds about right, and usually increase the amount of time needed between hardware upgrades.

-Depending on how much you spent initially, it could affect what you upgrade and how soon you upgrade it. Closer to the $2000 range, less parts. Closer to the $800 range, more parts.

-Prices vary depending on a lot of factors. Prices tend to drop a lot more, a lot sooner on PC due to sales and such (example: Sleeping Dogs is on sale on Amazon for $30 right now, probably $40 normally. I picked it up on PC, with all the DLC except the last 3 or 4 big packs, for $24 total.) Add in the stuff like "pay what you want" indie bundles, and "price per game" goes way down. Example: indieroyale.com - currently $6 for 6 games, including Serious Sam 3 (normally $40 on Steam, which also has it on sale by itself for $8)

-PC games can't be traded in, that's true. However, PC games can be kept and played on a computer indefinitely, aside from MMOs. Cracks exist for online authentication DRM that has gone offline, and tools exist for older games (DOSbox for the original Duke Nukem 1, 2, and 3D games, for example.)

-PC peripherals by themselves are not expensive. A wireless desktop package (mouse and keyboard) costs as little as $30, possibly even cheaper. Monitors cost as low as $100, or you can simply hook it up to your currently existing or an old TV. Headsets for VoIP gaming cost as low as $20. Gaming peripherals cost a lot more, both on consoles and PC - there is a wired Razr Xbox controller for $80, as well as a fight stick for consoles that cost upwards of $130.


Consoles:

-No argument

-No argument

-Again, depends on what game, where you get it, and how long after release you get it.

-They can be sold or bought used, however buying used means you're saving $5 at brick-and-mortar stores, and you may have to buy an online pass for the game to play online, or play with what a "new buyer" would own - which might mean spending more than just buying the game new.

-Console peripherals are fairly "set in stone," without going to third-party peripheral makers. Again, you have "gaming" equivalents, that cost more money than the standard what you need to play." Controllers cost $50, headsets cost $20. Meanwhile, gaming controllers cost $80-$130, and gaming headsets can cost $60-$200 depending on features included.


Those are my opinions and "counter-points" to the TC's opinions and points. In the end, it all comes down to several things - knowledge of both the hardware and where to get sales, dedication to having the "best of the best," and user preferences.
#7Dark_SpiretPosted 2/15/2013 1:31:45 PM
sumflipatyrdoor posted...
Draconas_Lyrr posted...
The biggest argument I see is the game expense. PC games are cheaper than console games, so the offset in price eventually makes up for the large price of the actual computer.

But can't you say ps3/360 games are cheaper since although $10 more you can buy used versions (which can be cheaper depending on how it's been out) OR you can sell your old games you've beat for less money (but money nonetheless) whereas PC games you can't sell them (for the most part)
i purchased AT LAUNCH Sleeping Dogs for $34, Borderlands 2 w/ the season pass for $57, Dishonored for $30, Hitman Absolution for $36 and many others from Greenmangaming. Even factoring console used titles youd be very hard to find a deal like that when a brand new game launches on consoles.

Also with DD its easier to package in special deals. For instance the Tomb Raider preorder bonus on steam which comes with ~$5 of free dlc and a free $15 game if you purchase before release. the RE6 deal (assuming it goes through) will include a free $20 game and $16 worth of dlc free if you preorder all on top of an already -10% to the base price for preordering. Other places also offer special deals for buying games like credit back. i took advantage of the new year sale(i cant remember if it was GMG or someplace else) to where i bought a $15 sale game and they gave me enough credit to buy another(i got DMC4) which cost me nothing.

with consoles they may be lenient on you and package in a extra free weapon or a special free bonus mission. youll rarely see them offer deals like you would on pc. Thats where the price difference will always come in. Yeah my pct might have cost me $1000+$300 for future upgrades, but thats ok cause i got an extra grand sitting around that i saved buying games this generation.
#8BjornAgainstPosted 2/16/2013 6:34:15 PM
PC games cost way less than console games do, you can't just look at the $10 cheaper price on launch day you also have to look at the sales. Steam has really awesome sales, it is not uncommon to find top quality titles on sale for 50% or even 75% off. When Steam does their Summer and Winter sales nearly every single title they have gets huge discounts, their sales are far better than anything you will see on a console.
#9AsucaHayashiPosted 2/16/2013 6:37:39 PM
F2P.

that is all.
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If console gaming is so cheap then why do I have to spend $600~ in order to play Super Mario Galaxy, Uncharted 3 and Halo 3?
#10angry_cowtipperPosted 2/16/2013 6:39:20 PM
I pick up games like Hitman: Absolution for $10. Granted, I have to catch it at the right time, but Steam does insane stuff all the time. If you sink $400 into a console vs $800 into a PC, and $60 guaranteed every newish game that comes out, saving $20-$50 at a time for games that aren't old at all will make the machine pay for itself in short order depending on how much gaming you do. PC gaming requires more upfront cost, but saves you loads in the long run, and lets you play games way better too. It's totally worth it.
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Don't Starve (PC), Okami HD (PS3), Halo: Reach (360), Dungeon Defenders (AND), Gravity Rush (VITA)