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Gaming as addictive as heroin? How many hours did your PS3 steal from you?

#21Mad_CauliflowerPosted 7/9/2014 5:19:15 AM
gotalambo posted...
Mad_Cauliflower posted...
Heroin doesn't steal time, per se, it steals lives.


Do you know Kim Dotcom? He is a famous ex-con/hacker and gamer who is in the leaderboards for many games. He was playing 15 or 20 hours a day.

Result? They took all his money. His wife left him. He is facing jailtime. He is massively obese.

All from gaming? Who knows. But it sure played a huge part.


All heroin addicts screw up their lives some how. Even that guy that killed himself over Everquest, isn't a good example of gaming being a negative influence.

one is genuinely stupid, the other when not on heroine (which provides the most euphoric and amazing feeling in the world) can barely accept being alive without it, because anything other than heroin is pain.
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#22nanofazz97Posted 7/9/2014 6:14:32 AM
The brain has undergone neural plastic modification to enhance the parts of the brain that are seeking heroin on a constant basis. The more you use those parts of the brain, the stronger the wiring of that part of the brain, and it will be more resistant to synaptic pruning, which is occurring in the other parts of the brain that are more relevant for everyday function.

Video games do the same exact thing, but on a much, much smaller scale. Dopamine release due to the virtual rewards of video games will enhance the synaptic connections in those areas, so that whenever you win the next boss fight, the dopamine release is more easily manipulated. Video games will make the brain areas that are responsible for visual perception, and peripheral function stronger. But unfortunately, the synaptic pruning is getting rid of the gray matter in your brain that is responsible for higher levels of critical thinking/cognitive reasoning. That's what is interesting about the brain and video games. The brain is unbelievably sensitive, so much so, that it will undergo plasticity in response to even just simple, interaction with a television screen (it doesn't even have to be induced from chemical injection).
#23Bleu_SkiePosted 7/9/2014 6:43:49 AM
No, not as addictive as drugs. Ps3 doesn't steal time. That is silly.
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#24TerotrousPosted 7/9/2014 6:45:14 AM
spycuba posted...
Do you spend as much time with friends & family? Will you tell your grandsons about those 1000s of hours WASTED for NOTHING in that you could have built companies, houses, written books or become a soccer star for germany in all this time? What will you tell your grandchildren when all you know is gaming?

http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2014-07-08-the-real-story-behind-the-suns-gaming-as-addictive-as-heroin-headline

Don't look at me, I finished my first book last year. My second book is about half done now.


nanofazz97 posted...
Video games will make the brain areas that are responsible for visual perception, and peripheral function stronger. But unfortunately, the synaptic pruning is getting rid of the gray matter in your brain that is responsible for higher levels of critical thinking/cognitive reasoning.

Video games clearly don't make your cognitive reasoning weaker, pretty much all "nerds" are hardcore gamers and it hasn't hurt their intelligence any. If anything it probably keeps your brain more active as compared to something like watching TV, which is a totally passive experience.


The biggest drawback you're likely to get from games is ADD. If you're used to a constantly high level of mental stimulation, when you have to do something that isn't very exciting you'll quickly lose interest. I definitely have this problem, which is why I'm constantly on these forums when I'm working. If I had to just do nothing for half an hour I would instantly start dozing off. My brain requires constant activity or it goes into sleep mode.
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#25nanofazz97Posted 7/9/2014 7:04:43 AM
Terotrous posted...



nanofazz97 posted...
Video games will make the brain areas that are responsible for visual perception, and peripheral function stronger. But unfortunately, the synaptic pruning is getting rid of the gray matter in your brain that is responsible for higher levels of critical thinking/cognitive reasoning.

Video games clearly don't make your cognitive reasoning weaker, pretty much all "nerds" are hardcore gamers and it hasn't hurt their intelligence any. If anything it probably keeps your brain more active as compared to something like watching TV, which is a totally passive experience.


The biggest drawback you're likely to get from games is ADD. If you're used to a constantly high level of mental stimulation, when you have to do something that isn't very exciting you'll quickly lose interest. I definitely have this problem, which is why I'm constantly on these forums when I'm working. If I had to just do nothing for half an hour I would instantly start dozing off. My brain requires constant activity or it goes into sleep mode.


In video games, the sense of reward after completing a task is immediate and certain. That means that you KNOW a reward is given after you complete a task in the game. So, you can intuitively think when it comes to problem solving in the video game in expectation for the reward. This is why trophy support has become a huge deal with PS3 gamers. If you have been playing video games constantly for years, the more difficult it will be for you to think critically when you are given real life tasks that require cognitive reasoning. However, this is easily mastered if a reward you desire follows the task. BUT, in most real life situations, that reward is basically nonexistent.
#26TerotrousPosted 7/9/2014 7:14:12 AM(edited)
nanofazz97 posted...
In video games, the sense of reward after completing a task is immediate and certain...

I do think games give people a sense of empowerment that they usually don't get from their everyday lives, and this is part of what makes gaming so compelling, but most people seem to be able to separate games from their real life goals and thus don't become seriously addicted.

Now, if we had convincing VR technology, this would probably start to be a big problem. If you had access to another world where you were important and successful and everyone loved you, why would you want to ever come back to this one?
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#27Dash_Dash88Posted 7/9/2014 7:19:36 AM
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#28nanofazz97Posted 7/9/2014 7:26:55 AM
Terotrous posted...
nanofazz97 posted...
In video games, the sense of reward after completing a task is immediate and certain...

I do think games give people a sense of empowerment that they usually don't get from their everyday lives, and this is part of what makes gaming so compelling, but most people seem to be able to separate games from their real life goals and thus don't become seriously addicted.

Now, if we had convincing VR technology, this would probably start to be a big problem. If you had access to another world where you were important and successful and everyone loved you, why would you want to ever come back to this one?


Yes, I can agree that most people are able to separate their gaming hobby from real life. That's why gaming addiction is not as common as drug or alcohol addiction. But, the people who struggle with gaming addiction just can't see past the rewards that come from gaming. They can't get the same sense of reward from any other source. But, it's like any other case, in which the earlier you catch it, the more easily you can reverse the effects.
#29TerotrousPosted 7/9/2014 7:33:16 AM
nanofazz97 posted...
Yes, I can agree that most people are able to separate their gaming hobby from real life. That's why gaming addiction is not as common as drug or alcohol addiction. But, the people who struggle with gaming addiction just can't see past the rewards that come from gaming. They can't get the same sense of reward from any other source. But, it's like any other case, in which the earlier you catch it, the more easily you can reverse the effects.

Yes, gaming can become addictive, typically in people who are depressed or are severely disengaged from their career, where the rewards offered by gaming provide them with their only happiness in life and thus they become very dependent upon it. The main method to avoid this is to ensure that you have multiple positive influences in your life rather than just one.
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#30master_chief_82Posted 7/9/2014 9:34:07 AM
Or tell your grandchildren the amount of time you wasted posting dumb topics on gamefaqs.