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Unsolved case(s)? *SPOILER*

#1IAznDragonI YanPosted 3/9/2013 2:21:26 AM
There was at least one or maybe two (I forgot) cases that were left unsolved. I remember the one at the end of the Homicide cases where you found the lair of the guy that was behind it all that killed the women and left them naked and wrote on their body with lipsticks.

Before you even got to complete it, the head police honcho comes and says stop, you are promoted, blah blah. What gives?
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#2Sin JackalPosted 3/11/2013 4:41:09 PM
Maybe he was the killer~? :P

During a few cases it seems like other policeman would get mad at you for trying to find out who's actually behind some of those crimes.

There's also a couple cases with a very cloudy outcome. . .such as the Golden Butterfly case. I just played that one again, and the "right" way to do it is to charge Eli (the predator), but it's completely unexplained at how he got ahold of the husband's tire iron, or fact that the husband's shoes he was burning are the same mold as the ones found at the crime scene. -_- Then, the motive behind the predator guy Eli for attacking the woman was supposed to be to steal her stuff, yet her money was still in her purse at the crime scene.

Some of the cases are either unsolved or seem to have hasty conclusions.
#3TrulyEpicLawlsPosted 3/12/2013 5:58:26 PM
Realism, that's what gives.

Unfortunately, politicians and even police departments aren't just a group of wonderful people who strive to help others as much as possible, and also some crimes just don't get solved.

This can be seen in how choosing the most likely suspect can get you an attack from your superior. They want you to put the 'right' person in prison, not necessarily the one who did the crime.
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#4Sin JackalPosted 3/13/2013 10:31:35 PM
I think we all know policemen don't try to help people as much as possible. Pretty sure no one said that. Phelps is supposed to be a "good cop" though, so that doesn't really apply here anyway.

I also don't think it's very realistic how they try to imprison people with really flimsy evidence in the game. That wouldn't fly now, but maybe it did back then.

And someone having a record doesn't make it "right" to throw them in prison for stuff they didn't do. Terrible logic imo. A guilty man's plea: Cast stones at me for things I've done, not for what others have done.
#5TrulyEpicLawlsPosted 3/17/2013 12:49:46 PM
Sin Jackal posted...
I think we all know policemen don't try to help people as much as possible. Pretty sure no one said that. Phelps is supposed to be a "good cop" though, so that doesn't really apply here anyway.

I also don't think it's very realistic how they try to imprison people with really flimsy evidence in the game. That wouldn't fly now, but maybe it did back then.

And someone having a record doesn't make it "right" to throw them in prison for stuff they didn't do. Terrible logic imo. A guilty man's plea: Cast stones at me for things I've done, not for what others have done.


Oooookay.
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The two argument-winning fads of forums: 1) Say 'calm down'. 2) Anyone with a view/opinion different to yours must be a troll, so you must therefore state this.
#6btaylorstlPosted 4/10/2013 12:26:48 PM
I didn't particularly like the way they handled the whole Homicide thread, from a story standpoint at least, but I think it at least withstands basic logical scrutiny, even if the details are sometimes implausible at best and preposterous at worst.

Basically, the whole idea is that Garrett Mason, the temp bartender that you meet in an early case, is the Black Dahlia killer as well as the killer of all these other women. The idea is that because of his work as a temp bartender, these women opened up to him about their personal lives and problems, and thus gave him the opportunity to learn about how to frame their husbands or other people in their lives for the crimes he actually committed.

That's why Cole is constantly skeptical, because so much of the ironclad evidence was found in such obvious places that it seemed very unlikely that the actual killers would have left it there. In one such instance, Deidre Moller's husband found the planted evidence and was caught attempting to destroy it. But in so many others, you just happen across the murder weapon, bloody clothes, and some other damning physical evidence right in the suspect's home or office, in plain sight.

Then when Mason starts leading you to him with the scavenger hunt stuff, you're getting other pieces of evidence proving that he's the real killer, since all of the suspects have obviously been locked up and couldn't have left these pieces of evidence out. And then when you capture him, the captain tells you that you have to hush it all up because he's a close relative of some unnamed super-powerful person in the country (the President, maybe?) This was obviously done to maintain some fealty to the real-life events in which the Dahlia case is still unsolved, and James Ellroy's book used a similar trope to account for that as well.
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#7btaylorstlPosted 4/10/2013 12:37:27 PM
To continue, to the problem I had with the way this was all handled was in several parts. First, it made you look back on your time on the Homicide desk (a huge part of the game and what you would expect to be the main thrust of your career going in) as a complete farce and waste of time. It would have been one thing if somehow the game gave you a sense that you really accomplished something in solving the Dahlia murder(s) off the books, but the way it played out was basically this: You railroad a bunch of obviously framed dudes for easy closures, and then the real killer essentially turns himself in with the whole ridiculous scavenger hunt thing. Cole himself even says that we'd never have caught him if he hadn't been so stupid as to basically lead them to his hideout by the nose.

Also, the game really heavily tipped off the player to the identity of the real killer very early on. I think the 3rd homicide case had you at yet another bar, and the bartender you interview made a point to explicitly mention the "temp" who was there that night twice. At that moment, it should have been patently obvious to Cole that there was a huge coincidence that these murders both had temp bartenders that night, and if he had bothered to follow up and find out who the temp was, it would have been clear as day. This oversight made the slog through the remaining framejobs very tedious, because you knew it would eventually get back to the obvious real killer, but only after you railroaded these innocent guys first. It just felt very unsatisfying.

The other aspect that made the Homicide desk a bit of a bummer to me was that the fact that all of these guys were so transparently framed in the same way made the way the cases themselves played out feel almost identical. It was just the same thing every time, and the resolution was never very interesting: you talked to the husband/SO, suspected him, talked to some other people incidentally related to her, eventually found the same "murder weapon" and bloody clothes in plain sight in some obvious location, and then locked somebody up. The story path they chose for this desk pretty much locked them into that repetitive pattern, and the mechanics of "solving" the cases suffered for it.

All that said, I understand why they made some of these choices; I just wish they'd been executed a little better. And the Vice and Arson desks, IMO, were far better and pushed the overall storyline in a very interesting way. I just think the Homicide desk was just weak by comparison, and made the game feel more "fat" in the middle than it needed to.
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#8vivalatourPosted 4/13/2013 11:22:41 AM
Q : how do you know when a policeman can't be trusted ? A : he smiles !
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