Spreading the plague

#1VargzPosted 2/15/2009 8:32:26 PM
Just wondering if this is possible. I've got a spy who acquired the plague from some city he was spying inside of, could I potentially stick him in other enemy cities and give it to them? If so, would one turn do or do I have to keep him there for longer?

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NZV
#2FIoydPosted 2/15/2009 10:51:14 PM
Yep I use bio warfare every chance I get and yes 1 turn is all needed. I send lots of spies to spread a large area and just keep rotating to keep it spreading.
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#3goodgodalreadyPosted 2/15/2009 10:55:53 PM
That's hilarious. I would have never thought about that. I'm setting the war crimes tribunal on you guys! heheh
#4rattler_playerPosted 2/16/2009 3:11:55 AM
i can't believe i've never thought of this. I'm definitly gonna start doing this.
#5Vargz(Topic Creator)Posted 2/16/2009 5:43:57 AM
Tried it our and it does indeed work :D Good stuff. Now I just need some way to create the plague so I can use this whenever I want. I wish I could keep some plagued rats around in a cage to bite my spies when I need them to.

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NZV
#6Vivid_Posted 2/16/2009 5:51:52 AM
Always thought the plague was a nuisance........ Till now!
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#7zhang_danPosted 2/16/2009 6:21:51 AM
Yeah its funny for a little bit but when you actually look into it further you realise your not doing yourself any favours,unless ofc its a last resort to slow an enemy down before they crush you,but really you shouldnt find yourself in that situation.

The only real use for it is to hit regions that are far away from your borders but the problem there is you spy will most likely die before he gets there.

You can however send one plagued spy to a mid range regions town/castle and have 5+ spys follow him,then get the 5+ spys to contract the plague then send them to the target region with maybe more spys behind them.

Its hassle and dosnt do that much to slow the AI down.
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#8forlorn_popePosted 2/16/2009 2:16:48 PM
yea doesn't seem worth it

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#9drowelfXPosted 2/16/2009 3:05:10 PM
On my next campaign I will try biological warfare, maybe if enough people find out about the possibilities in bio-warfare someone will make a mod that makes the plague more dangerous
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#10zhang_danPosted 2/16/2009 5:08:50 PM
Everyone trys it once in a while it can be fun and it adds another dimension to the game.

The main problem with it is its killing the civilians,its like when people went through the exterminate phase on rome,yes there is some kind of sick satisfaction from it but all your actually doing is lowering the tax you gain once you take the settlement,whats worse is on MTW you gain no money from the plague unlike etermination in rome so really whats the point of it?

Both lower the tax gains once you control the region,less civilians = less people to tax = less money,if your just cheating money there yeah ok i can see it wouldnt matter,but what about when it backfires and they send a spy to your territory?
Your then stuck with retraining and possibly losing some family members.

The other thing is when your outside the gates of a plagued city and they have reinforcements moving to that region,ofc you can siege it but then your stack suffers the plague once you take it.
Ive lost so many great generals because of the plague so im biased.

I could go on theres loads of bad effects/situations caused by the plague and the only plus is you get to watch a nation suffer but as the AI isnt bothered about retraining and reorganising stacks its no hassle for it but for me its a royal pain in the ass.

I really cant see anyone making a mod making the plague worse as it would only benefit those who you the console for money.

As always just my opinion
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"Life is nothing but a competition to be the criminal rather than the victim." Bertrand Russell