Just got this and enjoying but...(small spoilers)

#1ZalagrenPosted 2/12/2011 9:59:16 PM
I'm not sure I like how open ended the questions are. A lot of the time I feel like I'm punished for interpreting them a specific way, or the puzzle omits information vital to the solving of it that I could infer one way or another. I don't really like getting the questions wrong in this manner. If I'm flatout wrong, that's cool, it's a puzzle game and I can't get them all right. But when I have a technically correct solution that is punished...

For 2 examples, on was the dog puzzle near the beginning. I figured it out correctly but just removed the "wrong" legs. It still looked exactly like a smushed dog, just a different kind. Specifically:

\\
O
//

Is how I had the dogs legs and they wanted it as

\/
O
/\

Still a smushed dog, just with legs spread differently.

Second one would be the candle puzzle which asks you "how many candles remain at the end?" to which I answered 10. Simply because I assumed the puzzle was asking a trick question. Well, I would be right, except that the man apparently let the remaining 7 candles burn to nothing. Which I have no way of knowing or interpreting.

Am I honestly supposed to infer and figure out these things on the first guess? I feel like it's impossible to expect people to honestly guess correctly on some of these puzzles because some of the puzzles are vague enough to allow multiple interpretations. Am I wrong in thinking this?
#2TheGuidingLightPosted 2/12/2011 10:34:14 PM
The squished dog puzzle is an old and quite common matchstick puzzle (although the puzzle often refers to different animals such as a sleeping pig or a cow) and that's just the way the puzzle is typically answered (and is how, for example, squished creatures were often portrayed in old cartoons)

As for the candles, if every puzzle was spelt out in exacting detail (specifying, for example, exactly how long the candles were left to burn and that a burnt down candle was no longer a candle), they perhaps wouldn't be much of a puzzle
---
Professor Layton and the Unwound Future Illustrated Walkthrough
http://professorlayton3walkthrough.blogspot.com/
#3Zalagren(Topic Creator)Posted 2/12/2011 11:15:26 PM
Perhaps but that's not exactly what I was asking. I was mostly wondering if the game continues the trend. I realize they have some limitations(allowing correct answers for all possible interpretations/knowing all possible interpretations would be both time consuming and unnecessary), but it would still be nice not to run into puzzles open to interpretation a lot.

As for your response about the candle, I could just as easily say the reverse...it isn't much of a puzzle if it is vague enough to allow multiple logical solutions(and yet discard all but one conclusion)

I was just expressing minor discontentment over losing points over technically legitimate answers(though at this point in the game I still have no idea what those points actually do) Still fun so far, but I'm hoping more of the puzzles contain just a single solution
#4TheGuidingLightPosted 2/13/2011 12:24:51 AM
The puzzles you've seen so far are a fairly good representation of the types of puzzles you'll see later on

The picarats are simply your score and even the lowest possible score will unlock all of the bonuses by the end

There's no penalty for using the hints and the hints for the candle puzzle point the player in the right direction

By the way, someone else thought there'd be ten candles back in 2008
http://www.gamefaqs.com/boards/936050-professor-layton-and-the-curious-village/41337732
---
Professor Layton and the Unwound Future Illustrated Walkthrough
http://professorlayton3walkthrough.blogspot.com/
#5desert_santaPosted 2/14/2011 9:13:07 AM
I see where you're coming from TC. I also hated those kind of puzzles.

The second game continues the trend, the third one does not(thankfully, though there might have been a couple in there, but compared to the huge number in the other games it's no biggie).
#6bls_essexPosted 3/5/2011 7:45:13 AM

I agree with you. The way the puzzles are worded is maddening. The latest one is the chocolate lover one. The puzzle specifically says you aren't allowed to stack multiple segments of chocolate on top of each other. I thought it meant you can't cut the chocolate bar in half, stack those two halves on top of each other, and make another cut. It turns out what it meant was you can't cut more than one chocolate segment at a time.

Maddening.

#7TheGuidingLightPosted 3/5/2011 4:15:39 PM
I thought it meant you can't cut the chocolate bar in half, stack those two halves on top of each other, and make another cut

Well, that is what it means (with the implication that you're simply not allowed to break more than two segments at once no matter how you do it, such as using a knife to cut two segments placed side by side)

It turns out what it meant was you can't cut more than one chocolate segment at a time

Which is basically the same thing and if you did try to 'cheat' by breaking two segments at once, that's still two distinct breaks in the chocolate even if it's one breaking motion

Incidentally, the puzzle refers to breaking the chocolate by hand
---
Professor Layton and the Unwound Future Illustrated Walkthrough
http://professorlayton3walkthrough.blogspot.com/
#8SyberiaWinxPosted 3/31/2011 1:01:50 AM
It's 2011-there is no such thing as common matchstick puzzles. If you were to ask someone if they've ever played with matchstick puzzles in this day and age, they'd ask you what system it was for.D :

But I also hated the way a lot of the puzzles were worded.@_@
---
http://ruleoftherose.proboards104.com/index.cgi-The best and largest Rule of Rose forum out there!^^
#9SpacePirateKhanPosted 4/16/2011 4:27:09 PM(edited)
The Candlestick puzzle is the only one I find sucky, unless there's one more I'm forgetting or have yet to find. The rest of them, I could look back and see the facts I overlooked/interpreted wrong once I figured out the puzzle.
---
"The best things in life must be taken by force!"
~Captain Khan