Thinking about taking a crack at this game, JP questions *Mild Spoilers*

#1ChetleyDewPosted 7/29/2012 6:30:03 PM
Hey all. I tried playing this game a while back, and quite frankly I got overwhelmed by all the leveling/job stuff and didn't get too far. I loved what I did play, though, and would like to play the rest of the game. I kinda know what the general consensus is on what jobs I should give characters and so on, but I have some questions about jobs in this game. Namely, what is the best way of leveling up your jobs early in the game? In particular, I can't really figure out how one is supposed to get enough JP for the Knight class to use Rend Speed and Rend Weapon in the first chapter. There's probably some aspect of the game I'm forgetting, but I just want to know what the general thoughts are on this. Also, for example, I was wondering about a good way to level up the Chemists. Should I spend a lot of money on potions and then have the Chemists use potions constantly, even when they don't require them, so they get extra JP? I don't know if that'd be worth all the lost money or not. Any help on this is appreciated.
#2SyfaPosted 7/29/2012 7:38:40 PM
Any action you take while in a job, will gain you JP *for* that job - if you're a knight using squire abilities, you gain knight jp. There's also jp spillover - which works like "Character A is a knight, he does something which gains him 28jp (before jp boost), characters b,c,d,e all gain 7jp (1/4 of the jp character a earned) to the knight job. If character b were a black mage and did something that gained him 20 jp (before jp boost), characters a,c,d,e would all earn 4 jp to the black mage job".

Any easily repeatable action is a good way to gain jp - squires accumulate skill is one of the first that comes to mind (giving +1PA to a maximum of 99 pa, per use), the only problem with it is it will always cause a character to gain 10 exp, which can lead to issues with overleveling. Having mages whack people (even their own party members) with rods or staffs (DO NOT USE RODS THAT CAST SPELLS, THIS CAN KILL CHARACTERS EASILY) is a good source of jp.

Don't stick around in chemist job for too long, the skills in it are 'okay' but the stats you gain for leveling up in the job are a severe hinderance. Also don't stick around in knight job early on for too long, the knight is slow, has mediocre equipment and a very very expensive skillset for its use early on - its better to grab move+1, jp boost, accumulate and throw stone from squire, stay in knight just long enough to get the monk class (and probably pick up rend speed while in knight) and then stick in the monk job for a while (as it's a very powerful and versatile class).
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Farewell Monster Hunter. The black wind howls again...
As you are, I once was, As I am, You will be.
#3ChetleyDew(Topic Creator)Posted 7/29/2012 7:59:28 PM
Hm...good to know, thanks. Is there a danger to over-leveling beyond potentially making the game too easy?

And yeah, I hate the idea of keeping a Chemist for long, but I had heard I needed to make sure I got the potion abilities from that class at least. Also, should I also try to get Rend Weapon while I'm getting Monk unlocked? I had heard it was useful along with Rend Speed.
#4SyfaPosted 7/29/2012 9:26:43 PM
Most story battles with stay at a set level, random battles however will scale with the highest level character in your roster, this can leave you badly undergeared.

Breaking equipment is bad because if you want to remove equipment you can always just use steal instead and monsters don't use equipment (so it will rarely be utilized), rending speed, power and magic are much better due to how the battle system works. If a character has 5 speed he'll get a turn every 20 clockticks (the internal unit of time this games battle system uses), if a character has 1 speed (from getting hit by rend speed twice) he will get a turn every 100 clockticks (or more if you wait after attacking), which means that the character with 5 speed will get 5+ turns to the character with one speed. Rend power drastically reduces the damage enemies deal, and rend magic can utterly destroy a mages ability to harm you.
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Farewell Monster Hunter. The black wind howls again...
As you are, I once was, As I am, You will be.
#5ChetleyDew(Topic Creator)Posted 7/29/2012 9:52:09 PM
Thanks again. Also, how many generic characters should I focus on leveling up?
#6SyfaPosted 7/29/2012 11:13:44 PM
The most characters you can have in a battle is 5, so after I start, I typically scrap any generic without 70 brave(high brave determines how often reaction abilities work, low brave is used for finding items) or 60+ faith (higher faith makes better casters - both stats can be raised, but bravery below 5 and faith above 94 risks the character leaving you).

After getting rid of all the generics I re-hire 2 males and 2 females with stats and zodiac I like. You will get a large variety of special characters throughout the game so you may not end up using your generics the whole game.
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Farewell Monster Hunter. The black wind howls again...
As you are, I once was, As I am, You will be.
#7ChetleyDew(Topic Creator)Posted 7/29/2012 11:21:33 PM
Alright thanks, that was what I was wondering if I should do. Sorry for all the questions, but what Zodiacs are particularly good?
#8SyfaPosted 7/30/2012 1:34:09 AM
No zodiac in particular is 'good'. They all have their advantages and disadvantages.

Good compatibility between user and target increases accuracy of abilities, damage and healing by 25% (so a sword whack that would do 10 damage now does 12.5 truncated to 12).

Bad compatibility between user and target decreases accuracy of abilities, damage and healing by 25% (so a sword whack that would do 10 damage now does 7.5 truncated to 7)

Best compatibility increases accuracy, damage and healing by 50% (10->15)

Worst compatibility decreases accuracy, damage and healing by 50% (10->5).

Now while bad and worst obviously seem and sound bad, they can be useful in certain situations because certain story enemies have fixed zodiac signs, and it can be the difference between a boss taking one attack to kill you with good or best, to a boss taking 3-6 swings to kill you with bad or worst.

In general - it probably won't really come up in gameplay so it's not something to worry over, the only time I've actually seen it be an issue is when a person was doing a very specific and hard challenge and needed a boss not to instantly kill him. I've always plugged in my own birthday (july 8th / cancer 3) and done fine.
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Farewell Monster Hunter. The black wind howls again...
As you are, I once was, As I am, You will be.
#9GeekyDadPosted 7/30/2012 7:47:23 AM
ChetleyDew posted...
Thanks again. Also, how many generic characters should I focus on leveling up?


One thing to keep in mind I would say -- having learned this the hard way -- is not to let the special characters who join you go to waste. I had invested so much in my generic characters that when Agrias joined, I didn't bother with her. That made the game much harder for me until later on when I was able to get Balthier, Beowulf, and of course, Cid. So, I would recommend setting aside at least one of your generics for Agrias as soon as she joins, and hold on to the chicks who join with her, as they're useful for at least one side mission later in the game.
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"The hardcore you've been waiting for!"
#10ChetleyDew(Topic Creator)Posted 7/30/2012 8:15:54 AM
Thanks guys. I'll keep that in mind. But I don't need to really focus on leveling up Agrias' subordinates, just need to hold onto them?

Also, I understand that the generics may not end up being used much as I get the special characters so I guess it doesn't matter for them? But is there a particular job I should be shooting for for Ramza?