Local Dubai Politician, End-Game Character Questions (SPOILERS)

#1MysticNesslyPosted 1/20/2013 4:14:36 PM(edited)
I've just beatten the game, and with the help of re-watching events in the game, I think I have a decent understanding/interpretation of everything. However, I have still have a few lingering questions.

There are 2 characters that are mentioned or make a subtle appearance in the game, but their significance to the story is never fully explained. Well, at least I couldn't put the pieces together.

I haven't collected all the intel yet, so if I'm wrong please feel free to add input or correct me.

SPOILERS ** MID-GAME AND END-GAME SPOILERS BELOW **
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1) What is the whole reason behind preventing the people from evacuating on their own?

REFERRING TO:
A) Chapter "The Dune" (Chapter 2?), intelligence "Sandstorm - The Coverup." The producer tells the news reporter to tell the people to not evacuate immediately and instead wait for an "evacuation force."

B) One of the intel items you can find in the chapter titled "The Edge" (Chapter 5?) contains a conversation between the Radioman and a Dubai politician. The Dubai politician prevents news from getting out that the sandstorm is coming.
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Shortly after picking up this intel (B) from the map, you enter what I believe the politician's office. A photo of a man in a white turban and eyes blackened from gunshots is on the wall. If I'm not mistaken, this is the same man who is with Conrad in one of the photos shown in the beginning of the game.

I'm led to believe that the politician is purpousely setting up Dubai to play into the hands of Conrad once the storm sets in. Does anyone know anything about this? Am I completely off?

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2. At the very end of the game, if you choose to shoot the reflection of Conrad or allow his reflection to shoot you, Walker is shown looking over the city. He is then interrupted by a man/hallucination who randomly appears and asks Walker, "What now sir? The men are asking. What do we do now?" He then vanishes.

As far as I know, that's the only appearance of the man. He has a special outfit not shown anywhere else in the game and has a cataract in his right eye (or a glass eye in his right eye socket). What's the significance of this man? I am completely stumped as to who he is or what's the meaning of that scene.



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3.. Do you think it's possible that's Conrad's true motive for going into Dubai with the 33rd Battalion was to acquire wealth?

After reviewing the intro video, I now see there are some newspapers stacked on the table. One is titled "Untold Wealth Left Behind" and another is "Buried Treasure?" This has reminded me of a few things I saw in the game.

Near the very end of the game, before the fight with the heavy/Lugo hallucination, you pass through the 33rd's refugee camp. Beyond that you'll see some queue's for processing refugees and further down some stands where it appears that soldiers were selling meat to refugees for gold.

There was some grafitti on concrete around the middle of the game (where you see the large advert for cold sand), that says" Better this than slavery," and another saying "Damn the 33rd." So, I'm assuming this is written by rebels.

These two instances + the accumulation of expensive kitchenware / silk cloths in that one building leads me to believe the 33rd was having the people gather expensive items for the soldiers in exchange for refuge.
#2MysticNessly(Topic Creator)Posted 1/20/2013 6:42:06 PM
(SPOILERS)

4) Just after saving Lugo in the mall, there is a room you enter where you fight a heavy in the dark. This part was really bizarre. The lights were flashing (well, at least they seem to in Walker's eyes) Not only does the heavy teleport around the room, but whenever he moves to a new location, a mannequin takes the spot of where he was positioned before the heavy moved. Does anyone understand the significance of all this? I'm assuming this is a major turning point for Walker where his lost grip of reality reaches its maximum, but I'm not entirely sure.

I also notice those same mannequins appear on the rooftop of another building where a shootout occurs just minutes after the incident in the flashing room.
#3d1sPosted 1/22/2013 7:35:57 PM
You just blew my mind with some very goo points that I had glossed over in favor of the more overt points at play. I'll need to play thru again because I do recall having similar concerns, but completely forgotten about them after the game's grand reveal.
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#4ReDDevil2112Posted 1/23/2013 9:41:34 AM
From: MysticNessly | #001
I'm led to believe that the politician is purpousely setting up Dubai to play into the hands of Conrad once the storm sets in. Does anyone know anything about this? Am I completely off?

Not having found the intel myself, I cant give a certain answer on anything. But Konrad did attempt to evacuate Dubai, so I dont think he had any selfish motivations at heart (at least initially) that would prompt him to set up this whole situation with a politician. But I could be wrong.

2. At the very end of the game, if you choose to shoot the reflection of Conrad or allow his reflection to shoot you, Walker is shown looking over the city. He is then interrupted by a man/hallucination who randomly appears and asks Walker, "What now sir? The men are asking. What do we do now?" He then vanishes.

As far as I know, that's the only appearance of the man. He has a special outfit not shown anywhere else in the game and has a cataract in his right eye (or a glass eye in his right eye socket). What's the significance of this man? I am completely stumped as to who he is or what's the meaning of that scene.

Im pretty sure he shows up earlier in the game. IIRC, like right before then. In the lobby when the men greet you and say Dubai is yours. I believe he was one of the men there, but if not, Im pretty sure he was somewhere else in the game. And I think it just illustrates that the men in the lobby were never real to begin with.

3.. Do you think it's possible that's Conrad's true motive for going into Dubai with the 33rd Battalion was to acquire wealth?

Like I said at the beginning of my post, he did attempt to evacuate Dubai, so I dont think he was motivated by any personal gain (except, perhaps, to feel like a hero, like Walker). If he was in it for the money, I dont think he would have killed himself.

From: MysticNessly | #002
4) Just after saving Lugo in the mall, there is a room you enter where you fight a heavy in the dark. This part was really bizarre. The lights were flashing (well, at least they seem to in Walker's eyes) Not only does the heavy teleport around the room, but whenever he moves to a new location, a mannequin takes the spot of where he was positioned before the heavy moved. Does anyone understand the significance of all this? I'm assuming this is a major turning point for Walker where his lost grip of reality reaches its maximum, but I'm not entirely sure.

I also notice those same mannequins appear on the rooftop of another building where a shootout occurs just minutes after the incident in the flashing room.

I believe it was just a way of illustrating that Walker is losing his mind and we can no longer trust him as a character, nor can we trust his perspective of the world.
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#5MysticNessly(Topic Creator)Posted 1/23/2013 2:53:26 PM
ReDDevil2112 posted...
I believe he was one of the men there, but if not, Im pretty sure he was somewhere else in the game. And I think it just illustrates that the men in the lobby were never real to begin with.

Oh yea. You are right. He was there with the other troops to greet Walker just before entering the elevator. I agree with you that he was probably at the very top to illustrate that him and the others were hallucinations.

Like I said at the beginning of my post, he did attempt to evacuate Dubai, so I dont think he was motivated by any personal gain (except, perhaps, to feel like a hero, like Walker). If he was in it for the money, I don't think he would have killed himself.

Good point. They did have 'instant hot meals' in those boxes stored around their camps so the refugees probably had access to free food, but I'm still surprised the troops were having the refugees pay gold for meat. I guess the meat was considered a luxury so the troops charged for it. However, I'd really like to think the answer is not so simple. The newspaper headlines were in clear focus at least 3 times in the intro cutscene. Maybe someone else has some insight in this.
#6Ice_Cold1313Posted 1/23/2013 5:04:37 PM
1. I don't really recall the actual reasons why the Dubai leadership weren't evacuating the populace. It may simply be because they did not have the time, but they didn't want the backlash of only getting the richest people out.

2. That man piqued my interest as well, but I am not quite sure if he has major significance. It could be simply that the devs made him unique enough so that you WILL recognize him as the one you met downstairs, just to reinforce the hallucination thing. I'll look out for this the next time I play the game through.

3. I don't think Konrad (the actual one, not Walker's alto ego thing) is in there for traditional self-gain. Konrad is the first character in the story to try and be the "hero." Walker's opening monologue shows his admiration for the man for exactly this reason and much of the game is Walker's attempt to emulate Konrad ("Following orders doesn't mean anything if it means leaving people to die, Konrad would agree"). Konrad had shown indications of trying to be the 'hero' in the past, slightly revealed with Walker's recollections of Kabul where Konrad saved Walker by dragging his half-dead carcass through the desert to safety.

The newspaper clippings up in Konrad's Dubai office during Walker's monologue is indicative of this, with headings like "Can Konrad Save Dubai?" He is surrounding himself with symbols that portray him as the traditional hero, and he believes not only that these heroes can exist, but that he has the opportunity to be one, which is why Konrad volunteered not only himself, but his men for the evacuation mission, and then refused orders to come home.

Konrad's experience, in my opinion, parallels Walker's. He desperately wanted to be the hero so he brought his men with him, then disobeyed orders that told him to leave, because he still believed that the headlines could read "Konrad Saves Dubai." His men suffered as a result (the civil war that occurred in the 33rd being the climax of this, before Walker comes in of course), and the population had to suffer through continual conflict between Konrad's 33rd and the CIA led insurgents. None of that would have happened if Konrad hadn't tried to be the hero. His men wouldn't have turned on themselves, there would have been much less violence since the CIA wouldn't have intervened, and without the CIA intervening to stop Konrad, the water wouldn't have been destroyed. Like Walker (and the player), all of this would have been avoided if he had just walked away.

Konrad suffers a similar epiphany that Walker can (depending on your actions), and realizes what his "heroics" have brought Dubai and the 33rd, and kills himself.

4. Now in terms of why the soldiers are accepting precious metals for meals, I believe this is because they are melting down the metals to make bullets. As far as the silk goes, it just shows the complete inversion of the Dubai economy. Silk now becomes just another cloth, but one that is in abundance since this is Dubai and they were filthy rich lol.
#7guardian_owlPosted 1/24/2013 1:08:43 PM
They knew something major was coming, as soon as the news got out that an apocalyptic storm was approaching the city there would of been a run on grocery stores, looting, massive gridlock, protests, etc. This would make it very difficult to make a clean getaway before the storm hit The Politicians did their best to bury the story until they could complete getting themselves, their belonging, and all those "worthy" people out of Dubai.

In a more sinister view, perhaps subconsciously, they also saw an opportunity to wipe out what they perceiving as the "dregs" of society; the poor, illegal immigrants, criminals, etc. Convince them to wait for an imaginary evacuation until it is too late for them to escape, and then let nature do the dirty work for them. Did you ever wonder why, even though many countries during WW2 knew of the death camps few if any attempted to bomb the rail lines leading to the camps?

4.)Power corrupts, simple as that. Conrad entered with the intent to be the savior of Dubai, and his men followed with him. As the months passed I imagine some elements of Conrad's troops saw themselves less as saviors and more as masters and entrepreneurs . You do the work scavenging up the gold left behind, and I'll give you this meat, no expecting a free "hand out."
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#8MysticNessly(Topic Creator)Posted 1/29/2013 6:30:52 PM(edited)
Ice_Cold1313 posted...
2. That man piqued my interest as well, but I am not quite sure if he has major significance. It could be simply that the devs made him unique enough so that you WILL recognize him as the one you met downstairs, just to reinforce the hallucination thing. I'll look out for this the next time I play the game through.

I agree. I now see that.

Ice_Cold1313 posted...

3. I don't think Konrad (the actual one, not Walker's alto ego thing) is in there for traditional self-gain. Konrad is the first character in the story to try and be the "hero." Walker's opening monologue shows his admiration for the man for exactly this reason and much of the game is Walker's attempt to emulate Konrad ("Following orders doesn't mean anything if it means leaving people to die, Konrad would agree"). Konrad had shown indications of trying to be the 'hero' in the past, slightly revealed with Walker's recollections of Kabul where Konrad saved Walker by dragging his half-dead carcass through the desert to safety.

Interesting. Honestly, I thought of Konrad in more positive light compared to Walker, but after reading your comparisons I see they really are alike.

Ice_Cold1313 posted...

4. Now in terms of why the soldiers are accepting precious metals for meals, I believe this is because they are melting down the metals to make bullets. As far as the silk goes, it just shows the complete inversion of the Dubai economy. Silk now becomes just another cloth, but one that is in abundance since this is Dubai and they were filthy rich lol.

After a little more gametime and finding down the last few intels, I see that this is what the soldiers were doing. Thanks!



guardian_owl posted...
They knew something major was coming, as soon as the news got out that an apocalyptic storm was approaching the city there would of been a run on grocery stores, looting, massive gridlock, protests, etc. This would make it very difficult to make a clean getaway before the storm hit The Politicians did their best to bury the story until they could complete getting themselves, their belonging, and all those "worthy" people out of Dubai.

In a more sinister view, perhaps subconsciously, they also saw an opportunity to wipe out what they perceiving as the "dregs" of society; the poor, illegal immigrants, criminals, etc. Convince them to wait for an imaginary evacuation until it is too late for them to escape, and then let nature do the dirty work for them. Did you ever wonder why, even though many countries during WW2 knew of the death camps few if any attempted to bomb the rail lines leading to the camps?

Now that you mention it, there was a lot of traffic piled up on the highway (the very first place you start the game). I don't know why this didn't cue in sooner. Thanks for the clarification.

I didn't know about that tidbit about the camps. I had no idea anti-semitism was widespread.

guardian_owl posted...

4.)Power corrupts, simple as that. Conrad entered with the intent to be the savior of Dubai, and his men followed with him. As the months passed I imagine some elements of Conrad's troops saw themselves less as saviors and more as masters and entrepreneurs . You do the work scavenging up the gold left behind, and I'll give you this meat, no expecting a free "hand out."

I wouldn't be surprised if soldiers kept some of the gold for themselves, but it seems they were actually melting them into bullets. It's mentioned in one of the intels.
#9The Silver NoblePosted 2/3/2013 9:24:11 PM(edited)
About the man from the end- I had a thought.

I think saying that Walker wanted to be a hero doesn't quite cover it. He didn't just want to be a Hero, he wanted be Konrad. He viewed Konrad as the perfect hero. After "learning" that Konrad wasn't perfect, he still used Konrad as an ideal- just one to surpass, rather than simply aspire to.

I think having the man he imagined as Konrad's #2 come to him for orders- much in the way he would have for Konrad- was just another vision from his fragmented mind. Which I think was assumed, but... I don't think it was completely random either.
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#10d1sPosted 2/4/2013 5:37:15 PM
The Silver Noble posted...
About the man from the end- I had a thought.

I think saying that Walker wanted to be a hero doesn't quite cover it. He didn't just want to be a Hero, he wanted be Konrad. He viewed Konrad as the perfect hero. After "learning" that Konrad wasn't perfect, he still used Konrad as an ideal- just one to surpass, rather than simply aspire to.

I think having the man he imagined as Konrad's #2 come to him for orders- much in the way he would have for Konrad- was just another vision from his fragmented mind. Which I think was assumed, but... I don't think it was completely random either.


So in effect it signifies that Walker is now "Konrad?" Both aspired to be a hero and savior, and both's ambition ended tragically? In the beginning Walker set out to be Konrad. In the end his ambition led him to become exactly what Konrad became: a man whose ideals achieved far more harm than good, at the expense of the men under his command that continue to follow his orders and go along with his plan even after it clearly went straight to hell.

Man, that's deep.
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