a quick question for tony

#1venusePosted 4/14/2010 2:05:07 PM
well ive been thinking alittle bit about the size restrictions of wiiware and remembered a demo-scene game,.kkrieger , that used procedural based rendering and animation, etc. what i was wondering is if your quantum 3 game engine is compatible with procedural based rendering and if you ever thought about using it for wiiware games in some way to allow you to make a wiiware game of a great size with out worrying about size limitations of wiiware. especial since kkrieger is only about 96kb but has the graphical fidelity of a 1gig game.
i was just thinking that you could make a full featured game, say like the conduit, which normally wouldnt be possible on wiiware do the sizes involved and be able to release the said game both on wiiware and as a hard disc. or just a demo of a planed game.

i do understand that procedural based stuff can be difficult and time consuming to make as well as it makes for really long loading times. also i know little about making games so this question may be mute do to my lack of understanding of the process of creating procedural renderings and other stuff :P thanks for reading
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playing red steel 2, if you want a good game on the wii buy this.
#2DarkZV2BetaPosted 4/15/2010 12:08:11 PM
The Wii isn't capable of running that kind of tech. Especially not with the featureset in Quantum 3.
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#3HVSTony(VIP)Posted 4/15/2010 1:15:46 PM
Of course the wii can. Can procedural based gfx be done on the wii or anything else? Yes of course. The problem with that type of art and why it never caught on is implementation.


Those textures and art in that demo are completely generated out of pre calculated or calculating art and textures on the fly based on algorithms. Artists don't like making textures with math, they like making them in photoshop and other tools.


To make a long story short, if we would make a game using that type of system for the textures, the artist would be working in wordpad rather then photoshop. THere are no UV's and no local tangent space control for the image other then basic translation and scale.

Also characters and skinning would not work because those need to be meticulously put together with as much control as possible using tools such as maya or max. Neither of which support procedural based animation exporting (which looks like complete ass anyway)

If making lets say a physics puzzle game then yeah, but the limits and lack of control the artists have make it a completely useless option for making any type of full fledged game.

-Tony
#4venuse(Topic Creator)Posted 4/15/2010 2:47:56 PM
thanks tony, it was just on my mind and was wondering why so few people use it and now i know. sounds like you would have to be a real math wiz and have a ton of patients just to do something.

also if i remember right procedural rendering was being used on systems like the commadore 64, atari st, gameboy just to name a few. hell i bet you could probably program a game on to the average dollar store calculator if you had a way of storing the code .that may be pushing it though :)
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playing red steel 2, if you want a good game on the wii buy this.
#5articshardPosted 4/15/2010 2:49:21 PM
i love these explinations. i learn something new everytime and they are very well explained so that that people that do not have any experience or knowledge (i.e. me) can understand the concepts
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