tips for fighting different boxer types?

#1johnphenomenonPosted 3/5/2011 9:07:47 AM

this game is technically brilliant because each fighter you face is different, and you have to change you gameplan accordingly. but personally this makes me so unbelievably homicidally angry because I don't know the first thing about boxing. this extremely hurts this game's accessibliity to the casual gamer who never watches boxing or knows anything technically about the sport. the least they could've done is provided some kind of guide, or tips for fighting these boxers like something like what they do in champion mode. so, could someone help me out and give the best strategies to use against the different boxer types? i have the most trouble with counter punchers and outside fighters. i dont really have a strategy, i just brawl and try to hit the guy as much as i can. so i dont really have a problem with other brawlers, inside fighters, or conventional fighters, but ive never faced an unconventional fighter.

#2jc_dogg17Posted 3/5/2011 9:11:44 AM
Jab is key to setting everything up.
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#3Stinger911Posted 3/5/2011 10:35:12 AM
For counter punchers, don't throw big punches against them. That means don't charge up with RB, and only throw hooks and uppercuts VERY sparingly -- off of a counter, only if you can.

You want to throw jabs and straights mostly against a counter puncher. These offer the lowest counter windows. So when he tries to counter off your jab/straight, you counter his counter, typically off of a sway, but sometimes off a perfect block or dash, too. If you feed a counter-puncher with big hooks and uppers, he will have plenty of time to dodge and counter you.

For outside fighters, it depends on what type of fighter you are. For instance, Ali vs Lewis is an outside vs outside matchup. And the better outside fighter will determine who wins.

If you're an inside fighter, use your lunging jab (forward + jab) to get on the inside. The lunging body jab works well for this, too. Crowd your opponent, pressure him, and circle to wherever he circles so that you can cut off the wring. Use LB after landing combos to push him around into the ropes and the corner.

Jabs/straights do the least damage but are fast and have the longest range. They are the least easy to counter.

Hooks do heavy damage and are typically slower than jabs/straights, but not always. Tyson and Frazier have lightning fast hooks, but most don't. They have short range and are easier to counter than jabs/straights.

Uppercuts are the slowest and easiest to counter but do the most damage typically.

But all this depends on your fighter. Frazier, for example, has a 20 left head hook and 20 left body hook, but the rest of his punches are only middling to slightly above average. Lennox Lewis has amazing jabs and straights to the head but his hooks aren't great.

It's true that the more familiar you are with boxing and/or fighting (I watch MMA mostly), the more of an advantage you'll have in this edition of Fight Night, and that's a testament to how well EA recreated the sport.

Good luck.
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#4Kungfu KenobiPosted 3/5/2011 12:55:56 PM
Crowd your opponent

Keeping the pressure on an outside fighter is good advice, but sometimes (not to confuse the issue) you need to do the opposite. For someone with lots of reach, it takes a little bit for their straights to get full extension. You can use that distance to your advantage by staying on the outside as well. You might not be able to counter punch if you don't have the reach yourself, but as long as you're an illusive target, you'll force him to consider giving up some distance, and risk walking in to some of your punches.

This is a good way to deal with a very swift outside fighter, because you might not be able to pressure these guys. They'll just step back, circle around and chip away at you.

i have the most trouble with counter punchers

Styles Make Fights. You're going to have trouble with counter punchers. The counter puncher's whole style is about using finesse to turn your offense against you.

Stay away from him, and try to "steal" rounds by turning up the offense near the end of a round. If you can look busy, and land 3 or 4 punches for every one of his counters, then you might out-score him. Sure that counter punch can stun you, but it doesn't matter so much if the bell rings before you go down. You can draw him in, jab a little, and back off before too much comes back. Keep moving, and don't give him too many chances to fire back. The last thing you want is for him to turn the score cards around with a knockdown near the end of the match. Just stay calm, stay ahead on the score cards, and remember that you don't have to beat the other guy up all the time: Boxing is more than just a fight, it's a sport.

And just like above, sometimes you need to do exactly the opposite. Though I suspect if you're having trouble with counter punchers what I'm about to suggest might be your problem rather than the solution. Sometimes you can massively overwhelm a counter punchers defense with lots of combos. It's not unusual (at least in this game) for a counter puncher to not be able to take many hits himself. These guys use counter punches to bully you in to a slower paced fight where they're less likely to get knocked out.


And yeah, this game is kind of demanding on people not familiar with the sport.
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#5blarstankienPosted 3/5/2011 3:58:38 PM
You just have to play the hell out of the game and get a feel for doing exactly what you need to do at the right time. Assuming you're talking about multiplayer, people will catch on very quickly to a linear strategy and adapt accordingly. Here are a couple examples of different tactics and how to counter them.

Opponent is weaving a lot: Throw a couple body haymakers, then a couple to the head once they block low, then low again when they block high. This will force them to not play like a pansy and will probably result in you winning in the early rounds assuming they use this strategy as a crutch because they suck.

Outside fighters: Get good at cornering people through proper lateral movement. Block, weave, and lean your way inside. Don't throw ANYTHING until your inside. Even jabs and straights are easily countered if you're facing someone who knows what they're doing. It's usually best to start working the body to get their guard down, then punish their head with a haymaker, uppercut, or hook, then move right back down to the body. Pick your head shots carefully as out fighters typically like to lean around a lot waiting for a counter.

Keeping the pressure on an outside fighter is good advice, but sometimes (not to confuse the issue) you need to do the opposite. For someone with lots of reach, it takes a little bit for their straights to get full extension. You can use that distance to your advantage by staying on the outside as well. You might not be able to counter punch if you don't have the reach yourself, but as long as you're an illusive target, you'll force him to consider giving up some distance, and risk walking in to some of your punches.

This is completely wrong. Out fighters by their very nature have to be very good at judging distance. If you try to wait for them to come to you they will dance around and pick you off. The only instance I can see this working is if the inside fighter/brawler has a higher speed stat than the outside fighter, in which case it would be easier to simply rush inside and start throwing down. Staying out of range is what you do when your stamina meter is low, but that's about the only time you wanna back off as a brawler/infighter.
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#6Kungfu KenobiPosted 3/5/2011 6:29:06 PM
This is completely wrong.

Teddy Atlas disagrees with you.
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#7ProtoDudePosted 3/5/2011 6:32:40 PM
I've found that Atlas, Tessitore, and your trainer actually offer good advice most of the time. If you don't understand the subtleties of each fighter type they usually point out their weaknesses and strengths during the fights.
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#8blarstankienPosted 3/6/2011 8:21:25 AM
Teddy Atlas disagrees with you.

I bet Teddy Atlas doesn't have characters that are ranked in the top 20 and top 30 of the light and heavy weight divisions online. Good boxing advice doesn't always translate into good boxing game advice, unfortunately.
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#9johnphenomenon(Topic Creator)Posted 3/7/2011 1:21:15 AM

Thanks everybody this is really helpful. I'm actually talking about legacy mode though, i dont really play online, because i honestly suck at this game. Fight Night is the only game that i suck at, and still play. haha.

#10calinksPosted 3/7/2011 1:28:55 AM
The game does often give you good advice. I actually listen to my corner usually especially if I'm puzzled.
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